Bibliography: New Mexico Politics (page 4 of 5)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Everett D. Edington, Erica McClure, Richard P. Holland, Frederick C. Wendel, Marsha V. Krotseng, Matt S. Meier, Feliciano Rivera, Susan Fuhrman, Miles T. Bryant, and Santa Fe. New Mexico State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Diamond, Tom (1974). State Responsibilities for American Indians — Texas. The Tiguas of El Paso, Texas; the Coushattas of Louisiana; and the Tortugas of Las Cruces, New Mexico share a common background in that they represent American Indian tribes who, having lost their land base, have been abandoned by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and have experienced recent circumstances of poverty. Since Indian rights stem from their original ownership of land, the BIA generally takes the position that it will not assume responsibility for an Indian group without a land base. However, Title 25 of the U.S. Code (Section 334) states that equal treatment should be afforded all Indians regardless of place of residence. Due to recent efforts on the part of the Tiguas, the Texas State Legislature has assumed full legal responsibility for these El Paso Indians. While the Coushattas and the Tortugas have not been as successful, the Tiguas have provided a precedent and a blueprint for recognition of tribes without a land base. Recognition is a relationship between a unit of government (State or Federal) and a tribe, wherein the government provides services for the tribe which are not provided for the general public. A suggested blueprint for recognition involves procurement of: (1) an anthropologist to document tribal history; (2) an attorney to accept responsibility for coordinating the effort; and (3) an effective public relations man. Descriptors: American Indians, Equalization Aid, Federal Government, Land Acquisition

Wendel, Frederick C., Ed.; Bryant, Miles T., Ed. (1988). New Directions for Administrator Preparation. UCEA Monograph Series. This publication contains six selected papers from the 30th Anniversary Meeting of the University Council for Educational Administrators (UCEA) in the fall of 1987. The first article, by John A. Thompson discusses problems associated with implementing the agenda of the Holmes Group report in decentralizing the control of schools. Leslie, Snyder, and Giddis, in the second paper, discuss the changes in Florida's administrator preparation programs that delegate virtually all responsibility for training school principals to school districts. In the third study, Pohland, Milstein, Schilling, and Tonigan also take a state level perspective in discussing how the reform climate of the eighties has affected the preparation program at the University of New Mexico. They focus on the flaws inherent in the technical and corporate models of the educational administrator that are implied in the reform movement. Shapiro, in the fourth study, assesses and contrasts two curricular models: the medical model (oriented toward the clinical experience) and an alternative conceptual model that he labels the "artificial science" approach. The last two papers propose shifts in the curricular orientations of preparation programs. Colleen S. Bell argues that managerial instruction attempting to simplify and homogenize organizational experience ill-prepares students for the real life of administration, while Tetenbaum and Mulkeen review gender-based studies that focus on the difference in world view of men and women and differences in the way men and women approach administrative tasks. A bibiliography is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Education, Administrator Role, Educational Administration, Elementary Secondary Education

New Mexico State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Santa Fe. (1983). Survey of Political Participation, Employment and Demographic Characteristics of Eleven Counties in Southern New Mexico. Volume I. The report briefly outlines the population characteristics, public employment and political representation status of the Chaves, Curry, Eddy, Lea, and Roosevelt counties in southern New Mexico for a 10-year period. The three sections of each profile focus on the county government, largest city in that county, and school district encompassing that municipality. Information in each profile includes: demographic data for 1970 and 1980 describing the composition of the population, its income and poverty status, and changes in population base over a 10-period; composition of elected state, county, and city officials by race, ethnicity, and sex for the years from 1969 to 1983; county and city governments' work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of 1982; enrollment data for the largest district in the county by race and ethnicity for selected school years from the 1968-69 to the 1983-84 school terms; composition of the district's school board by race, ethnicity, and sex for 1973 to 1983; and the district's work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of the 1982-83 school year. A section describing the geographical scope, data sources, and methodologies used to compile and analyze the data concludes the report. Descriptors: City Government, Economic Factors, Educational Trends, Elementary Secondary Education

Meier, Matt S., Ed.; Rivera, Feliciano, Ed. (1974). Readings on La Raza–The Twentieth Century. This chronological anthology consists of documents and articles on the history of Mexican American people in the 20th century. The anthology may be directed to students in higher education, historians, and those interested in the Mexican American people. Section I spans the period from 1900 to 1920 and introduces immigration as the starting point for the history of La Raza in this century. Section II, covering from 1920 to 1930, describes the movement of Mexicans and Mexican Americans from their Southwest heartland to steel mills, packing plants, and "colonias" of the Midwest. Other sections address themselves to the development of a hostile attitude on the part of many Americans to the rising tide of Mexican immigration, as was exemplified by the Harris and Box bills in Congress. Section III deals with repatriation in the 1930's. Chicano World War II experiences both at home and overseas are described in Section IV. The Second World War introduced a new era in Mexico-United States relations, formalizing the use of bracero labor. Section V traces continuing postwar demands for Mexican labor and the resultant increase in both braceros and majados. The impact of these workers eventually led to "Operation Wetback" and finally to termination of the bracero program in 1964. Section VI encompasses a broad spectrum of contemporary Chicano activities and ideology, especially an increased and more aggressive political activity. These 6 sections are chronologically sequential, with some unavoidable overlap. Descriptors: Activism, Anthologies, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Background

National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC. (1986). Engineering Education Problems: A Guide to Legislative Action for NSPE State Societies. This document is intended to serve as a resource for state societies of the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) in the preparation of action plans targeted at legislative changes in support of engineering education. The results of action taken recently by various state legislatures in response to NSPE state society activities are reviewed. Guidelines for development of an action plan include publication of pertinent data (Appendices A and B provide examples), lobbying, Political Action Committee involvement, hints for contacting legislators (Appendix C), hints for contacting media (Appendix D) and useful source documents (Appendix E). A guide to implementation of the action plan poses such questions as: (l) What resources are needed to solve the problem?; (2) What form should the resources take?; and (3) For how long should the resources be provided? Summaries of case studies of successful initiatives from New Mexico, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania and Michigan are provided. Descriptors: Case Studies, College Science, Data Analysis, Data Collection

Fuhrman, Susan; And Others (1979). State Education Politics: The Case of School Finance Reform. School finance reform has reflected, over the last 10 years, the changing relationship between education and state government. Emerging from the case histories presented here is the conclusion that, gradually, the barriers separating education policymakers from general government have been lowered. At the same time, the fragmentation among education interest groups has increased. While the process of school finance reform has varied among the states, a number of common elements characterize reform in six states discussed here (Maine, Florida, New Mexico, California, Missouri, and South Carolina). First, reform occurred when compromises were made within study commissions prior to legislative consideration. (Oregon, where such compromises were not made, offers this publication's sole example of the failure of reform.) Second, the involvement of governors and key legislators was necessary. Although the role of traditional education groups was relatively low, new interests, including taxpayers, minority groups, cities, and nationally recognized organizations, played an important role. The availability of state funds, judicial pressure, and long periods of planning time were all important. The reform process did not change significantly throughout the 1970s in spite of emerging issues like declining enrollment and accountability. Descriptors: Case Studies, Elementary Secondary Education, Equalization Aid, Finance Reform

Edington, Everett D.; Martellaro, Helena C. (1984). Variables Affecting Academic Achievement in New Mexico Schools. To determine if a relationship can be found between school size and academic achievement, a study examined correlations for 566 New Mexico public schools (grades 5, 8, and 11) from 1978 to 1981. The measure of academic achievement used was the schools' average "total scale score" on the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills. The two questions to be answered were whether there is a relationship between school enrollment size and student achievement, and whether there is such a relationship when correlations have been made for certain other predictors of achievement. Examining the 12 multiple regression model results (3 grades times 4 years) indicated that in 11 cases, school enrollment size was not significantly related to academic achievement. The study concluded that school enrollment size was not related to academic achievement, and that percentage of students eligible for Title I and percentage of Native American and Spanish American students appeared to be significantly related to academic achievement. Recommendations were that since academic achievement seems unrelated to school size, other factors should be considered when school consolidation is contemplated, and since academic achievement appears highly related to socioeconomic and cultural/ethnic factors, these two areas should be considered when developing new programs. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indians, Comparative Analysis, Consolidated Schools

Krotseng, Marsha V. (1987). The "Education Governor": Political Packaging or Public Policy? ASHE Annual Meeting Paper. The popular image of the "Education Governor" was investigated, with attention to: (1) the extent to which the specific education measures proposed in inaugural and state of the state addresses of 20 "Education Governors" of the 1960s through 1980s corresponded with the subsequent actions of these officials; and (2) the specific personal attributes, professional goals and activities, and actual involvement in education that characterize these "Education Governors" of the 1960s through the 1980s. The roots of the "Education Governor" idea are traced to four turn of the century governors, one from North Carolina, two from Virginia, and one from Alabama, all of whom held office between 1901 and 1911. The 20 recent governors and their states are as follows:. Jerry Apodaca (New Mexico); Reubin Askew (Florida); Edmund G. Brown, Sr. (California); John Chafee (Rhode Island); Bill Clinton (Arkansas); Winfield Dunn (Tennessee); Pierre S. duPont, IV (Delaware); Robert D. Graham (Florida); Clifford T. Hansen (Wyoming); Mark O. Hatfield (Oregon); Richard J. Hughes (New Jersey); James B. Hunt (North Carolina); Thomas Kean (New Jersey); Tom McCall (Oregon); Robert E. McNair (South Carolina); William G. Milliken (Michigan); Russell W. Peterson (Delaware); Calvin L. Rampton (Utah); Robert D. Ray (Iowa); and TerrySanford (North Carolina). Included are 30 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Change Strategies, Educational Change, Governance, Government Role

New Mexico State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Santa Fe. (1983). Survey of Political Participation, Employment, and Demographic Characteristics of Eleven Counties in Southern New Mexico. Volume II. The report briefly outlines the population characteristics, public employment and political representation status of the Dona Ana, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, Otero, and Sierra counties in southern New Mexico for a 10-year period. The three sections of each profile focus on the city government, largest city in that county, and school district encompassing that municipality. Information in each profile includes: demographic data for 1970 and 1980 describing the composition of the population; its income and poverty status, and changes in population base over a 10-year period; composition of elected state, county, and city officials by race, ethnicity, and sex for the years from 1969 to 1983; county and city governments' work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of 1982; enrollment data for the largest district in the county by race and ethnicity for selected school years from the 1968-69 to the 1983-84 school terms; composition of the district's school board by race, ethnicity, and sex for 1973 to 1983; and the district's work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of the 1982-83 school year. A section describing the geographical scope, data sources, and methodologies used to compile and analyze the data concludes the report. Descriptors: City Government, Economic Factors, Elementary Secondary Education, Enrollment Trends

Case, Elizabeth J.; King, Richard A. (1985). Influencing State Fiscal Policymaking: The Superintendent as Lobbyist. Perceptions of the political behavior of superintendents in New Mexico vary widely throughout the state. Questionnaires and interviews were used to gather information from superintendents, school board chairmen, and state legislators concerning the frequency, extent, and kinds of political activity in which superintendents were involved. Four kinds of activity were assessed: involvement in issue definition and proposal formulation, the mobilization of support for or opposition to policy proposals, attempts to influence policy as an individual rather than as a member of an association, and activity affecting specific fiscal issues. Superintendents were classified on a continuum from highly active to relatively inactive. The degree to which a superintendent was active was taken to reflect the superintendent's own beliefs concerning appropriate levels of political activity as well as those of his community and school board. Superintendents at both ends of the continuum saw themselves as less active than they were perceived to be by either legislators or board chairmen. The training and experience levels of superintendents appeared to affect the extent of their activity. Those closer to the state capitol proved more active than those located farther away, perhaps reflecting greater community support for political activity. Five pages of references are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Administrator Role, Community Influence, Elementary Secondary Education

McClure, Erica (1992). The Pragmatics of Codeswitching in Mexican Political, Literary, and News Magazines, Pragmatics and Language Learning. A study investigated the syntactic properties and functions of English-Spanish code-switching in literary, political, and news magazines in Mexico. It is proposed that oral code-switching in Chicano communities and written code-switching in the Mexican press differ both syntactically and pragmatically, with the latter more syntactically restricted. Spanish is found to be the matrix language in the Mexican press, while in Chicano code-switching the matrix language is not always discernable. Several possible explanations are offered. In addition, it is found that code-switching in the Mexican press has limited pragmatic functions because it involves a written channel, is addressed to an anonymous audience, and is constrained by negative attitudes toward the type of code-switching found in the United States' Chicano community and the ambivalent status of English in Mexico. Finally, it is noted that this ambivalence is reflected in the use of English in the Mexican press, where it is used both to evoke a more precise image or sophisticated tone than a Spanish word or phrase and to attack American politics and values.   [More]  Descriptors: Code Switching (Language), Cultural Context, Discourse Analysis, English (Second Language)

Garcia, Juan R., Ed; And Others (1988). In Times of Challenge: Chicanos and Chicanas in American Society. Mexican American Studies Monograph Series No. 6. This anthology compiles articles and essays on Chicano and Chicana political concerns in the 1980's, on cultural aspects of the Chicano experience, and on historical issues and events. The papers are: (1) "Chicano Politics after 1984" by Christine Marie Sierra; (2) "Hacia una Teoria para la Liberacion de la Mujer" (analysis of the relationship of women's economic exploitation to patriarchal and racial oppression) by Sylvia S. Lizarraga; (3) "The Chicano Movement and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo" by Richard Griswold del Castillo; (4) "Assimilation Revisited" (social mobility versus cultural loss) by Renato Rosaldo; (5) "En Torno a la 'Teoria de las Dos Culturas' y su Aplicacion a la Literatura Chicana" (examination of Dieter Herms' application of Lenin's theory of two cultures to Chicano literature) by Lauro Flores; (6) "Anticlericalism in Two Chicano Classics" by Lawrence Benton; (7) "The Relationship of Spanish Language Background to Academic Achievement: A Comparison of Three Generations of Mexican American and Anglo-American High School Seniors" by Raymond Buriel and Desdemona Cardoza; (8) "The Causes of Naturalization and Non-Naturalization among Mexican Immigrants" by Celestino Fernandez; (9) "The Los Angeles Police Department and Mexican Workers: The Case of the 1913 Christmas Riot" by Edward J. Escobar; (10) "The Rediscovery of the 'Forgotten People'" (the socioeconomic situation of the Taosenos–Chicanos in Taos County, New Mexico–since they were studied by George Sanchez in 1940) by Ruben Martinez; and (11) "La Vision de la Frontera a Traves del Cine Mexicano" (historical analysis of Mexican movie depictions of the border region) by Norma Iglesias. Descriptors: Anthologies, Mexican American History, Mexican American Literature, Mexican Americans

Holland, Richard P., Ed. (1983). The Interactions of Federal and Related State Education Programs. Volume II: State Case Studies. This collection of case studies of eight states–California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Virginia, Wyoming–documents a 1981-82 investigation of federal and state administrative interactions across a select sample of federal education programs. To represent a wide spectrum of political, economic, and institutional environments relevant to educational policy administration, six criteria were used in picking the sample, including (1) state support for education, (2) state fiscal stress, (3) regional location, and (4) state political culture. A second set of factors included state efforts to coordinate federal and state special pupil programs and state policies of particular interest. Each case study relied on documentary material and personal interviews with an average of 40 individuals at the state and local levels. Topics studied included state management of federal and state programs, and state political environment. Results indicate that (1) both federal and state governments are shapers of state education policy decisions, (2) federal and state policy priorities for special students are frequently divergent, (3) state educational agencies are better organized than 15 years ago but dependent on federal dollars, and (4) intergovernmental conflicts between state and federal governments are relatively mild and uncommon.   [More]  Descriptors: Compliance (Legal), Conflict, Educational Administration, Educational Environment

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