Bibliography: New Mexico (page 107 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Albuquerque All Indian Pueblo Council, Melissa Howard, Jane Grainger, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Commission on Indian Affairs, LEONARD DELAYO, Sally W. Noe, New Things Considered, Betty Lou Dubois, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Board of Educational Finance, and Bill Pike.

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1991). HIV/AIDS Guidelines for Special Education Populations. This report presents guidelines for implementing human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) curriculum with New Mexico students receiving special education services. The guidelines are organized by grade level, noting content themes, objectives, disciplines/subjects, and resources available. The guidelines are intended to be integrated across all subject areas. The curriculum covers: "What Do I Have To Do To Be Healthy?" (Grade 1); "What Is a Healthy Community?" (Grade 2); "What Makes Me Special?" (Grade 3); "How Do I Stay Healthy?" (Grade 4); "How Do I Fit into a Healthy Community?" (Grade 5); "Why Are My Choices Important?" (Grade 6); "What Are My Choices?" (Grade 7); "How Will My Choices Impact My Life?" (Grade 8); and expansion of the grade 6 to 8 topics in grades 9 to 12. Appendices describe resources referred to in the curriculum, describe print and video materials useful with the AIDS curriculum, list resource organizations, list developmental characteristics of children and youth, provide forms for evaluating AIDS education curriculum and materials, list student competencies for health education, and outline New Mexico State Department of Education regulations on AIDS.   [More]  Descriptors: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Curriculum Evaluation, Disabilities, Educational Objectives

Pike, Bill, Ed. (1976). Health Careers Recruitment Program Handbook. Designed to encourage Native American students in Colorado and New Mexico to pursue health careers, this handbook presents the following information: (1) statistics documenting the need for American Indian health professionals; (2) current career opportunities in the health professions (descriptions of the many health fields and descriptions of professional practice and health service agencies, including such careers as environmental aide, school health, research, occupational therapist, etc.); (3) preparing for the health professions (secondary school preparation, college level training and preparation, admission into the health professions schools, special Indian programs, and financial planning); (4) where to obtain additional assistance (counseling and advice, additional sources of information, recommended reading list, and glossary). Among the more important specifics presented in this handbook are: lists of professions requiring and those not requiring a college degree; lists of new and emerging health professions; a selected list of four-year colleges and universities in the Southwest and Rocky Mountain states; a list of New Mexico technical-vocational schools; a list of organizations offering special Indian programs; a budget for first year students at U.S. medical schools (estimated minimum expenses for 1975-76); and information on grants, scholarships, etc.   [More]  Descriptors: Allied Health Occupations Education, American Indians, Career Opportunities, Colleges

Dubois, Betty Lou (1976). British-Tradition English in the American University. Lektos: Interdisciplinary Working Papers in Language Sciences, Special Issue. This paper describes the English language problems encountered by foreign students at New Mexico State University, students whose previous educational experiences have included extensive use of British English. Specifically dealt with are West African students having lived in a situation where "transplanted English" was introduced by administrators and military men, but did not succeed in eradicating the preexisting languages of the territories in question. Following a discussion of the historical and educational background of New Mexico State University, the foreign student background is described, and features that characterize the varieties of English spoken by these students are listed. Since few foreign students succeed in regular freshman English composition courses, the university has a special English program. Admission and placement of foreign students is discussed, and comparison is made with courses in Spanish for native Spanish-speaking Americans. Three basic needs are defined: (1) greater intelligibility in speech, (2) greater intelligibility in writing, and (3) a greater sociolinguistic range in terms of knowing the rules that govern interaction and conversation in American English. It is hoped that the existing English course for foreign students can be revised to meet these needs.   [More]  Descriptors: English (Second Language), Foreign Students, Higher Education, Language Attitudes

New Mexico State Commission on Indian Affairs, Santa Fe. (1986). Office of Indian Affairs 1985 Annual Report. The major goals of the New Mexico Office of Indian Affairs (OIA) in 1985 were to enhance Indian education concerns, aid tribes in economic development, and effectuate a smooth working relationship between state, local, and tribal governments in the spirit of and through the use of the Joint Powers Act. Advancement is reflected in all these areas. The report outlines the OIA's activities in: (1) inter-governmental coordination, facilitation, and negotiation (Social Services agreements, highway projects, increased communication with Eastern and band Navajos, the Santa Ana land transfer, and the Inter-American Indian Congress); (2) legislative action both in the state legislature and in Congress; (3) education (higher education initiatives, Bernalillo hot lunches, Public Law 874 Impact Aid, presentations to education study committees, bus routes, and the Pueblo Pintado Pre-school program); (4) economic development and employment (Navajo Service Delivery Area designation, computer profiles, economic development conference, and the President's report on reservation economies); (5) health (improved water system, adolescent injury prevention project, awards of vehicles, and Indian senior citizen centers); and (6) informational services ("The Source" newsletter, and public, tribal, and governmental information assistance). A map of New Mexico's Indian reservations is appended. Descriptors: Agency Cooperation, Agency Role, American Indian Education, American Indian Reservations

New Things Considered (1990). What Curriculum for the 21st Century?. "New Things Considered" reports on emerging trends and issues in education to policymakers and participants in SEDL-SCAN, an emerging issues tracking system being pilot tested by the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory's Policy Information Service and the State of New Mexico. This issue presents brief summaries of the thinking of SEDL-SCAN analysts on topics related to the impact of the expansion of technology on today's courses and instructional systems. One concern expressed is that little tends to be abandoned in the curriculum, and that usually new topics are simply added on; the analysts feel that it is time instead to change the way some subjects are taught. Implications of technological advancement on the curriculum are briefly discussed, and the launching of the Las Cruces (New Mexico) Public Schools Environmental Scanning Project is announced. Additional trends and/or events that are noted focus on the implications of changes in the way educators think about learning for the construction of schools, libraries, museums, and public parks; a project to initiate the development of national teaching standards: more international challenges for U.S. schools from proposed new standards for European school systems; the ability of computer users to enter computer-generated worlds called virtual reality; and the current slowing of world population growth.   [More]  Descriptors: Basic Skills, Curriculum Development, Educational Change, Elementary Secondary Education

Popp, James A. (1975). An Examination of Children's Books on the American Indian, BIA Education Research Bulletin. In an effort to determine whether or not children's books on the American Indian were perpetuating false myths, stereotypes, and negative attitudes, 49 children's books (all the books from the Acomita Day School and a random selection from the Albuquerque Public library and the Learning Materials Center at the University of New Mexico) were read and evaluated in terms of: (1) attitude expressed (author's attitude toward Indians); (2) derogatory language (e.g., warlike, savage, brown men, barbarians, etc.); (3) stereotyping by terminology and/or pictures; (4) knowledge expressed by the author; (5) usefulness of the book in the classroom (based on use at Acomita Day School in Albuquerque, New Mexico); (6) the degree of depth or superficiality of the book (based on research and incorporating informative detail). Evaluation indicated that out of the 49 books read: 7 expressed a negative attitude toward Indians; 6 had some derogatory language and 3 had a lot of derogatory language; 20 had a little or some stereotyping in the terminology, while 27 had a little, some, or a lot of stereotyping in the pictures; 18 demonstrated excellent subject knowledge, while 23 showed fair and 8 showed poor subject knowledge; 23 rated extremely useful, while 4 rated very useful, 14 rated fairly useful, and 8 rated not useful at all; 16 were superficially written, while 33 demonstrated in-depth attention.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Books, Childrens Literature, Content Analysis

All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM. (1980). All Indian Pueblo Council: On-Site Teacher Education Program. The All Indian Pueblo Council and the University of New Mexico (AIPCUNM) jointly developed a program of on-site instruction, counseling, and advisement for Pueblo adults pursuing the Associate of Arts degree and the Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education. The expectation was that Native American children would learn more and feel better about themselves and school if they were taught by adults from their own community, who understood their needs and could communicate effectively with them. Serving 19 pueblos throughout northern and northwestern New Mexico, the program was aimed at developing the facilitative teaching component, composed of 3 major factors: (1) one's self-awareness; (2) interpersonal communication skills; and (3) one's recognition and use of modeling.  Nineteen AIPC-UNM graduates participated in the 1980 evaluation study, conducted by an independent evaluator and using control groups from the same Pueblos, which analyzed patterns of interaction between teachers and students in the classroom, and results of questionnaires measuring students' self-concept and attitudes toward school. Findings indicated that students of AIPC-UNM graduates had significantly more positive attitudes and higher self-concepts than equivalent control groups, and that AIPC-UNM graduates conducted classes in ways expected to facilitate students' emotional and intellectual growth to a greater degree than the non-AIPC group. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Biculturalism, Communicative Competence (Languages)

Grainger, Jane, Ed. (1977). Enduring Heritages: A Guide to Multicultural Education in the Secondary School. During 1975-76, Menaul School, a private, coeducational four year high school for boarding and day students, served 137 Spanish-surnamed, 38 Anglo, 17 Native American, 4 Black, and 29 international students. Emphasizing the unique and valuable contributions of these diverse groups, multicultural education enabled the students to retain and develop their cultural identity while learning the values and lifestyles of mainstream America. During the year, multicultural themes were included in English, Spanish, French, sociology, history, New Mexico Studies, Native American Studies, environmental science, home economics, music, art, and religion classes. Unit outlines are given for: English ("The Diary of Anne Frank" and writings of Asian, Black, Mexican and Native American authors); social studies (regional folklore and history and New Mexico's history and culture); home economics (Chinese, Italian, Jewish, North American, Spanish/Mexican American foods); Christian Education (religious dances from various cultures); and science (Chaco Canyon). The five major events celebrated during the year are outlined–Black Heritage Day, Lunar New Year, Christmas, a Pow-Wow, and a Mini-Course Week. Appendices include: a discussion of current emerging needs and issues; guidelines for evaluating textbooks; a listing of the nutrient content of some Southwestern foods; eight New Mexican folk tales; and a student essay on Father Antonio Jose Martinez.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Black Culture, Boarding Schools, Cross Cultural Training

DELAYO, LEONARD (1967). SUMMARY OF TITLE I, ESEA SERVICES. THE COMPENSATORY EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR 55,507 DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS IN NEW MEXICO'S PUBLIC AND NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE LISTED IN THIS REPORT. OF NEW MEXICO'S 90 LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS, 69 REPORTED THAT THEIR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS DEMONSTRATED A CLASSROOM READING PERFORMANCE WHICH WAS SIGNIFICANTLY BELOW GRADE LEVEL AND 60 REPORTED THAT MANY STUDENTS HAD A LOW LEVEL VERBAL ABILITY. THE MOST PREVALENT TYPES OF PROJECT INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES WERE READING PROGRAMS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION. GUIDANCE, COUNSELING, AND HEALTH SERVICES WERE THE MOST FREQUENT SERVICE PROGRAMS. IN ADDITION TO FUNDS RECEIVED FOR CHILDREN OF LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, TITLE I APPROPRIATIONS WERE RECEIVED FOR HANDICAPPED, INSTITUTIONALIZED DELINQUENT, AND MIGRANT CHILDREN. SINCE THE TITLE I TESTING PROGRAM WAS NOT COMPLETED AT THE TIME OF THIS REPORT, PROGRAM EVALUATION WAS BASED ON RATINGS BY PROFESSIONALS AND NONPROFESSIONALS IN THE LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS. ARRANGED BY COUNTY AND SCHOOL DISTRICT, THE REPORT CONTAINS STATISTICAL DATA ON ALLOCATIONS OF FUNDS AND DETAILS OF PROGRAM EXPENDITURES. A SUMMARY OF A SUMMER PROJECT FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRANT WORKERS IS ALSO INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Annual Reports, Compensatory Education, Delinquency

Howard, Melissa (1981). My Neighbor Is a Battered Woman. This book is intended as a general introduction to the problems of battered women. The format for part 1 consists of the presentation of facts about wife beating, i.e., who are victims, characteristics of batterers, the environment in which family violence exists, and services for battered women. These facts are illustrated by the presentation, on alternating pages, of a fictional wife battering situation. Part 2 of the booklet provides advice for the victim before, during, and after the attack and presents information on the role of the police, going to court, criminal and civil charges, and restraining orders. The decision about whether a battered woman should stay with the man or end the relationship is also discussed. Part 3 of the booklet includes a suggested reading list and a resource list of shelters and other family violence programs and resources in New Mexico. Although the information about legal matters and resources for battered women is geographically specific to New Mexico, the booklet provides a useful basic introduction to anyone interested in learning more about the problem of wife battering. Descriptors: Battered Women, Case Studies, Civil Rights, Delivery Systems

Noe, Sally W.; Wright, Gregory, Ed. (1979). This Proud Land, A Unit in Native American Studies. The American Indians of the Southwest–their history and culture from ancient to modern times–are the focal point of this resource manual based on an American history course developed at Gallup High School, Gallup, New Mexico. The course covers ancient culture and migrations of the Indian tribes now inhabiting New Mexico and the coming of Spanish explorers and Anglo settlers; it concludes with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. This guide includes an outline for the two-semester course, performance objectives for students, maps, charts, sample tests and study guides, chronologies, and two detailed units of study titled "Navajo Clan System and Distribution" and "Migratory Distribution". Brief background is provided on southwestern geology and physical geography; on cultural differences and similarities among the Anasazi, Hohokan, and Mogollon-Mimbres cultures from which modern tribes descent; and on the history and culture of Pueblos, Zunis, and Apaches–especially the "apaches de nabahu", the Navajos. A bibliography of 55 entries directs the reader to in-depth information on various aspects of Southwest history. Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indians, Ancient History, Anthropology

New Mexico State Board of Educational Finance, Santa Fe. (1978). BEF Postsecondary Study–House Memorial 15. The report of the Board of Educational Finance (BEF) of New Mexico, which was required by House Memorial 15 (1978), and which describes programs and operations of two-year postsecondary institutions in the state, is divided in to three parts. Part I provides information on types of doctoral, masters, baccalaureate, and subbaccalaureate programs at the university and two-year college levels. Each of the universities was found to offer some two-year associate degree programs in addition to traditional university degree programs. Data related to the employment record of those completing the various vocational programs on the several campuses are also included. Part II addresses the question of the need for additional postsecondary institutions in New Mexico. The BEF has suggested guidelines when developing any future proposals for additional institutions. Part III contains a series of BEF recommendations related to the possible revision of the Branch Community College Act. It has been suggested that the Act be expanded to include an option by which some two-year colleges could operate as independent institutions. However, the BEF failed to agree with the suggestion and recommended that the essential elements of the Act remain as they are, with the exception that the contract between each branch and parent university be approved at the time of each revision by the BEF. Descriptors: Associate Degrees, Board of Education Policy, Community Colleges, Degrees (Academic)

Digneo, Ellen Hartnett, Ed.; Shaya, Tila, Ed. (1968). Report of the Extensive Reading Program 1965-1968. The report, covering 1965-68, deals first with a program entitled Improved Preparation for Culturally-Deprived Rural Children, which was designed to improve reading skills of elementary school students. Background of the Western States Small Schools Project for New Mexico is described, as well as how Carrizozo Public Schools were selected for the program. Roles of public school personnel, State Department of Education staff, and the Ford Foundation are then presented. Criteria for selection of a teacher to participate in the program are given, and the progress of the first 2 years is discussed. Plans for the third year complete the first part of the report and become the outline for the Carrizozo Reading In-Service Program, the goal of which was to make every teacher in the Carrizozo district (from primary through high school) aware of, and practice, skills of diagnostic teaching to improve students' reading comprehension. Consultants were provided by the Reading Research Center at New Mexico State University. Objective program evaluation by pre- and post-program tape recordings revealed, for example, that teachers were able to elicit higher level responses through use of higher level questioning behavior at the end of the program. (Appendices are not included due to marginal legibility.)   [More]  Descriptors: Attitudes, Comprehension, Consultation Programs, Diagnostic Teaching

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1974). Competency-Based Certification. Interim Report II. As part of New Mexico's investigation into competency-based certification, it was decided in 1973 that the most equitable, sound, and reliable approach would be through models development. Guidelines for model development include the following elements: replicability, internal evaluation, external evaluations, and several components. The components are as follows: (a) the models must take accreditation into account, providing methods whereby school evaluations for accreditation purposes can be accomplished; (b) the models must provide a training component which may be in some form of a broadly defined inservice concept; (c) the models must provide for a needs assessment; (d) the models must be based on district- and building-level objectives which are commensurate with current statewide programs of objective evaluation; (e) the model must provide a definition of competence in terms of goal accomplishment for all levels of educational tasks; and (f) the models must be directed to all individuals being certified under Section 77-8-1, New Mexico Annotated, 1953 compilation. Model locations have been identified. The schools involved in models development during 1973-74 will design the models, implement them, and then provide adequate opportunity and assistance to the state department for evaluation of the effectiveness of the models. The task force is committed to the concept of allowing the models to shape the common plan for certification and recertification rather than to the concept of developing a plan and requiring that the models conform to it.    [More]  Descriptors: Accreditation (Institutions), Competency Based Teacher Education, Guidelines, Inservice Teacher Education

Howard, Melissa (1981). Mi Vecina es una Mujer Colpeada (My Neighbor Is a Battered Woman). This book, the Spanish version of "My Neighbor is a Battered Woman," is intended as a general introduction to the problems of battered women. The format for part 1 consists of the presentation of facts about wife beating, i.e., who are victims, characteristics of batterers, the environment in which family violence exists, and services for battered women. These facts are illustrated by the presentation, on alternating pages, of a fictional wife battering situation. Part 2 of the booklet provides advice for the victim before, during, and after the attack and provides information on the role of the police, going to court, criminal and civil charges, and restraining orders. The decision about whether a battered woman should stay with the man or end the relationship is also discussed.  Part 3 of the booklet includes a suggested reading list and a resource list of shelters and other family violence programs and resources in New Mexico. Although the information about legal matters and resources for battered women is geographically specific to New Mexico, the book provides useful, basic information to anyone interested in learning more about the problem of wife battering. Descriptors: Battered Women, Case Studies, Civil Rights, Delivery Systems

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