Bibliography: New Mexico (page 109 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Jake Huber, James G. Cooper, Bryceson Pinto, William B. Carlin, Elias J. Duryea, Benjamin Coca, Washington Women's Bureau (DOL), Thomas P. Keyes, Joan M. Jensen, and Billy E. Askins.

Jensen, Joan M. (1985). Crossing Ethnic Barriers in the Southwest: Women's Agricultural Extension Education, 1914-1940. Draft. From its inception in 1914 until 1940, the New Mexico Agricultural Extension Service was quite successful in delivering educational programs to non-English speaking, Hispanic women in Santa Fe County and almost totally unsuccessful in Dona Ana County. Criteria for success were involvement of ethnic women in the program, ability to adapt national and state programs to local economic and social conditions and needs of these constituents, the amount and quality of transfer of technology occurring, and the number of rural people able to remain on the land. Fabiola Cabeza de Baca, Santa Fe County extension agent from 1929-1940, was primarily responsible for the agency's success in northern New Mexico. She reached 80% of farm families by organizing 13 adult clubs and children's food, clothing, and gardening clubs; providing weekly newspaper columns in Spanish; helping Hispanic women obtain canning equipment and sewing machines; encouraging women to take an interest in the interiors of their homes; and promoting sale of traditional handicrafts. Service in southern Dona Ana County was hampered by lack of Hispanic, bilingual agents; frequent agent turnover; lack of funds; affiliation with the Anglo-oriented Farm Bureau; and strict gender segregation of children's clubs. Descriptors: Adult Education, Anglo Americans, Comparative Analysis, Delivery Systems

Huber, Jake, Ed.; And Others (1976). Regional Interstate Planning Project Program… Bilingual/Multicultural Education Seminar Report (San Antonio, Texas, November 17, 18, 19, 1976). Sponsored by 10 State departments of education (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming), the Project participants met in San Antonio, Texas, on November 17-19, 1976 to discuss bilingual/multicultural education. Since Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas have had significant experience in this field and have moved forward in the development of policy and programs in the area of bilingual education, Project representatives from these states were asked to give presentations discussing the state-of-the-art of bilingual/multicultural education. Participants also visited the Institute of Texas Cultures and six local bilingual educational programs; listened to a group of junior high school students who shared their experience in crossing racial barriers; and listened to a discussion of a unique and challenging program developed for the Bay City (Texas) Independent School District. Presentations covered bilingual education and evaluation problems, the Bureau of Indian Education, the "Lau" issue, language assessment and a sociolinguistic alternative to the Lau remedies, and the present state of bilingual education. This report gives the presentations and a synopsis of the other activities. Also included are the participants' responses to an evaluation of the seminar.   [More]  Descriptors: Agency Role, American Indians, Bilingual Education, Court Litigation

Devlin, J. Stuart; Carlin, William B. (1988). Entrepreneurship and Economic Development: The Navajo Model. The Navajo Nation, in the summer of 1987, sponsored the Special Pre-Business Introduction for Navajo Students (SPINS) program through the business colleges at three universities: (1) University of Arizona; (2) University of New Mexico; and (3) New Mexico State University. SPINS provided entrepreneurial training, through entrepreneurship workshops, for high school seniors in an attempt to stimulate home-grown business and reverse economic stagnation in the area. Reflecting the matriarchal Navajo society, a majority of the students were female. There was a broad diversity in the cultural, socio-economic, and preparatory backgrounds of the students, but all were able to master the materials easily. The curriculum stressed the functional areas of business through lecture, projects, and field trips to actual businesses. The hands-on program emphasized computer simulation exercises that gave students the opportunity to make marketing, management, and financial decisions for a firm and then see how these decisions affected the firm in a competitive market. Although initially reluctant, students later asked to make numerous operating decisions. Another program involved students in developing a rudimentary business plan for a new business on the reservation. Students reported the experience to be valuable. The program provided high school enrichment, encouragement for students to pursue college educations, and tribal economic development through increased business expertise. Descriptors: American Indian Education, Business Administration Education, Economic Development, Entrepreneurship

Amodeo, Luiza B.; And Others (1981). Rx for Inservice Success: Cooperative Efforts Between University and Teacher Center. A description is given of the cooperation between the Las Cruces Teacher Center (New Mexico) and New Mexico State University. The university's college of teacher education and the teacher center are now working together to meet the needs of preservice and inservice teachers. The university has interacted with the teacher center at various preservice and inservice levels. These have included: (1) graduate courses; (2) recertification courses; (3) individual faculty presentations; and (4) center director interaction with preservice undergraduate students from the university. The director of the center has attempted to reach as many undergraduate students as possible. Frequent presentations are made by the teacher center for undergraduates in early childhood classes, elementary and secondary student teaching, and all four levels of the university's cooperative education program. An exchange program with British teacher centers has also been initiated with participation by both teacher center and university faculty. Joint planning efforts are made between the university and the teacher center, and the center director feels free to request and to suggest potential courses or offerings. University faculty are interested in teaching at the center and frequently request to do so. Descriptors: College School Cooperation, Cooperative Planning, Higher Education, Inservice Teacher Education

Coca, Benjamin (1980). Actividades Para Padres: A Parent Handbook (Activities for Parents: A Parent Handbook). Thirty Mora, New Mexico parents attended a 13-session parent involvement workshop (The Mora Adventure) designed to help parents foster successful school experiences through non-school activities with their children. A parent involvement model was used as the basis of the workshop in which the parents developed more effective communication skills; learned more about Mexican American culture and New Mexico history; discovered, developed, and learned to use educational activities and materials in the home; gained a better comprehension of educational jargon; and learned to evaluate educational materials. The handbook contains a lesson plan outline for each of the 13 sessions which includes goals, necessary materials, and the organization of activities for the session. An additional section contains information for parents about reading, reading readiness, and reading skills such as word attack skills, dictionary use, determining sequence, and drawing inferences. Brief activities and suggested exercises are included for each area. The handbook briefly explains the aims and justification for bilingual/bicultural education. In addition, the handbook contains a glossary of 64 educational terms, a list of 88 abbreviations and acronyms, an extensive list of references, information on the "Coca" model for a parental workshop, and information about materials acquisition. Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Communication Skills, Educational Experience, Family Environment

Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC. (1975). Report on Conference on Employment Awareness for Indian Women. An informal coalition of the North American Indian Women's Association, the New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women, and the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor presented a two-day program in Shiprock, New Mexico, to provide employment awareness for Indian women. The July 24-25, 1975 program was attended by 200 Navajo and Hopi women who participated in a day of workshops which provided them with basic employment information (such as interviewing techniques, resume writing, employee rights, benefits awareness, and child care) and also provided each woman with answers to specific employment concerns. The second day was devoted to a panel consisting of an employee and an employer from all the major firms in the Farmington-Shiprock area. Employees responded to employer presentations of practices and problems regarding the employment of Indians, and both sought solutions to specific problems and concerns. Recommendations of conference attendees included the Bureau of Indian Affairs implementation of a paid Federal Women's Program coordinator at each agency on the reservation; the establishment of a youth center in the Shiprock area; and the building of an all-vocational school on the Navajo reservation.   [More]  Descriptors: Agency Role, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Career Awareness

Cooper, James G. (1977). The Effects of Ethnicity Upon School Achievement. The study examined the effects of ethnicity, family income, adult education level, and unemployment rates on school achievement. Data were obtained from 85 public school districts in New Mexico which enrolled primarily Spanish-surnamed pupils. The composite achievement scores from the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills (CTBS) for grades 5 and 8 were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. The socioeconomic variables of family income, adult education level, and unemployment rate were then entered as control variables in the analysis of covariance. These analyses, one for grade 5 and another for grade 8, were repeated for each of the following years: 1972, 1973, 1974, and 1975. Data were obtained from the New Mexico School Profiles for each year. It was found that when ethnicity was considered as the sole independent or predictor variable, it accounted for 19 to 30% of school achievement, as measured by the CTBS composite scores. However, when the effects of family income, adult education level, and unemployment were taken into account by covariance procedures, then ethnicity did not have a significant effect on school success, as measured by the CTBS scores. Ethnicity accounted for only 2 to 4% of achievement when the socioeconomic variables were introduced. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Ethnicity, Grade 5, Grade 8

Askins, Billy E.; And Others (1977). Effect of the Responsive Environment Early Education Program for Low Birth Weight Children of Preschool Age. This paper describes an external evaluation study of the Responsive Environment Early Education Program (formerly known as the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children), an educational intervention program for "high risk" (low birth weight) 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children in Clovis, New Mexico. Major goals of the program are: (1) to prevent school failure through the early identification and remediation of developmental learning deficiencies and to integrate handicapped children into the regular school program; (2) to provide in-service training to selected early childhood and kindergarten teachers and aides employed by various school districts of New Mexico; and (3) to disseminate information concerning the program. Evaluation of the instructional activities was based on a pre-posttest design (without a control group) using standardized tests which measured children's language development in Spanish and English, school readiness, and self-concept and personality development. In-service training and dissemination activities were subjectively evaluated using site-visits, observations, records, and self-reports by the staff. Findings of the follow-up study of former REPSAC students are reported in a separate study, not in this paper. Findings indicated that: (1) students made significant gains in language development in Spanish and English and in general school readiness; (2) students developed and/or maintained a positive self-concept and substantially developed in various dimensions of personality growth; and (3) in-service training program objectives were achieved.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academically Handicapped, Bilingual Education, Body Weight

Askins, Billy E.; And Others (1977). Outreach Activities (Replication Services) of the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children (REPSAC): End of Year Evaluation Report, 1976-77 (Second Year Evaluation Study). The outreach activities component to REPSAC, an extremely successful early childhood bilingual intervention program in Clovis, New Mexico, enabled the project to provide replication services to various local education agencies requesting such services. During 1976-77, services included the training of selected teachers and aides to acquire competencies in working with young, high risk, and handicapped children. Conducted on-site at the replication centers (9 school districts and 9 Head Start Centers located in isolated areas in New Mexico) and at the parent center, training was taken to these centers by a specially designed and equipped motor coach. Evaluation of the training was conducted by an external evaluation team via objective evaluation of the workshops; classroom visits; site-visits with administrators, teachers, and aides; self-evaluation questionnaires from the trainees and trainers; and a review of various records/logs maintained by the outreach training team. A follow-up study of former REPSAC students in grades 1-5 was conducted. Findings included: the training program for the teachers and aides was extremely effective; services provided to the schools in the isolated areas were extremely needed; and the follow-up study indicated a change to an upward trend for Spanish language development, a continued slightly upward trend for English language development, and a mild downward trend for learning aptitude.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academically Handicapped, Bilingual Education, Early Childhood Education

Duryea, Elias J.; And Others (1986). Health Promotion Efforts in an Isolated Hispanic Community: The Mora Substance Abuse Prevention Project. An alcohol and drug use education program was developed by teachers and administrators in Mora, a small, isolated Hispanic community in northern New Mexico, in cooperation with the town's public health nurses and a University of New Mexico research team. Pre- and posttests were given to 150 students in grades 7-9 in the Mora Public Schools to assess: behavioral intent for accompanying drinking drivers and experimenting with pills, knowledge of alcoholic content of beverages, perceived impairment of driving ability from marijuana smoking, frequency of drinking to excess, and frequency of accompanying drinking drivers. Teachers kept logs of drug/alcohol related incidents. Treatment exercises were given to students after teachers received inservice training in their use. Health promoting outcomes included favorable changes in behavioral intent for riding with impaired drivers. Interviews with teachers and officials suggested that health behavior variables such as peer pressure were not sufficiently impacted by treatment exercises. Previous attempts by health educators had failed in this close-knit, culturally isolated town; but, this program was accepted because the research team observed cultural strictures, was introduced by an accepted individual, and prompted community responsibility for resolving the problem. Appended tables include pre- and posttest results, sample reporting forms, and teacher reports of substance misuse incidents.   [More]  Descriptors: Alcohol Education, Community Cooperation, Community Involvement, Cultural Isolation

Askins, Billy E.; And Others (1977). Responsive Environment Early Education Program (REEEP). Final Evaluation Report, 1976-1977 (Second Year). Formerly the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children, REEEP is an educational intervention program for "high risk" (of low birth weight) 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children, living in the Clovis, New Mexico area. Goals of REEEP, an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title III program, are: to prevent school failure with an intervention program which includes early identification and remediation of developmental learning deficiencies and to integrate handicapped children into the regular school program; to provide in-service training to selected early childhood and kindergarten teachers and aides employed by various New Mexico school districts; and to disseminate information concerning the program. Evaluation of student achievement was based on pre- and posttests using standardized tests which measured language development in Spanish and English, school readiness, and self-concept. In-service training and dissemination activities were subjectively evaluated using site visits, observations, records, and self-reports by the staff. Major findings included: students made significant gains in language development in English and school readiness; students indicated a positive and continuous growth concerning self-concept and social development; the variable making the greatest contribution to language development in English was IQ; and the in-service training provided to the 47 teachers and aides was extremely successful and effective.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academically Handicapped, Bilingual Education, Demonstration Programs

Keyes, Thomas P. (1988). Teacher Empowerment and Renewal: A Fourteen-Month Mid-Career Enhancement Program. A description is given of the Teacher Enhancement Program developed by the University of New Mexico in conjunction with the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools. In developing this program, designed to discover and address the needs of mid-career teachers, the developers first examined the rationale behind preservice and first-year supervision and support programs and the ways in which knowledge of beginning teachers might inform the choice of a program responsive to the needs of experienced teachers. A discussion is offered on the problems faced by the program planners, such as questions of costs to the institutions and participants and allocation of time. The collaborative roles of the university and the schools within the organization of the program are described. In discussing the design of the curriculum, an explanation is presented of the reasons for deciding to create a model that included a focus on the teacher as an individual striving for self-improvement. From this focus, a model emerged that had a framework encompassing six major themes: reflection, empowerment, knowledge, collaboration, articulation, and self-evaluation.   [More]  Descriptors: College School Cooperation, Curriculum Development, Enrichment Activities, Improvement Programs

Askins, Billy E.; And Others (1978). Outreach Activities (Replication and Training Services) of the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children (REPSAC). Final Evaluation Report, July 1, 1977-May 26, 1978, Third Year. The outreach activities component of the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children (REPSAC), an extremely successful early childhood bilingual intervention program in Clovis, New Mexico, enabled the project to provide replication services to various local education agencies requesting such services. During 1977-78, student services were provided on-site at the replication centers (7 school districts and 3 Head Start Centers, all located in isolated areas in New Mexico). A specially designed and equipped motor coach took training to the replication centers. This training was evaluated by an external evaluation team via classroom visits; site visits with administrators, teachers, and aides; self-evaluation questionnaires from the trainees and trainers; and a review of various records/logs maintained by the outreach team. A follow-up study of former REPSAC students, who in 1977-78 were in grades 4-6, was conducted. Findings included: learning aptitude scores (IQ) remained relatively stable from the initial testing in the fall of 1971 to the testing in the spring of 1978; English language development scores gained substantially after the first year of intervention and again at the end of the second year of intervention; Spanish language development scores showed the greatest amount of fluctuation since the initial testing in 1971; the test results indicated that 90% of former REPSAC students were in regular classrooms and 10% in special education classes; and 2 students had been retained 1 grade and 5 students had required special assistance.  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academically Handicapped, Bilingual Education, Elementary Education

Pinto, Bryceson, Comp. (1980). Zuni Alternative Learning Program. Begun in August, 1976, the Zuni Alternative Learning Program for junior high school and high school students not attending school anywhere else focuses on reading, writing, verbal and non-verbal expression in a multicultural setting, computational skills, Zuni culture, and practical skills. The program offers courses which meet the minimum standards of the New Mexico State Department of Education in the areas of language arts, reading, social studies, mathematics, science, arts and crafts, practical arts, and physical education. New Mexico-certified teachers provide highly individualized instruction in small classes for the 70-80 students, who enter the program by choice or referral from Zuni High School. Credits earned are accumulated for graduation and students meeting state high school graduation requirements receive the Zuni High School diploma. The program includes field trips, night classes, and a summer program which provides more extended travel and learning opportunities. Appendices include a statement of purpose and philosophy, brief descriptions of 10 programs within the Zuni Division of Education, and a list of Zuni books available to the Zuni community and local schools. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indian Studies, Cultural Education, Curriculum

Hardwick, Jon William (1975). Filmmaking, Filmmakers, and Films: The Filmmaker-in-the-Schools Approach. The purpose of this study was to discuss ideas on the nature of filmmaking, filmmakers, and viewers; provide a philosophy of teaching filmmaking for art education; survey the growth of filmmaking-in-school curriculums; show the development and operation of the National Endowment for the Arts and Office of Education Filmmakers-in-the-Schools Project; present a detailed analysis and evaluation of the New Mexico Project; and present some findings, conclusions, and recommendations on the teaching of filmmaking for the future. Data used in this study were assembled from state and national filmmaking files, published and unpublished materials, and photographs of film footage produced during the New Mexico project. A discussion of filmmaking, filmmakers, and film viewers was presented, focusing on the magic of filmmaking for the individual, the influence of the independent filmmaker upon recent trends in filmmaking, and a description of the new films' viewers. An approach to the filmmaking experience and a method of teaching filmmaking is presented, based on a humanistic-experiential framework philosophy for art education. Descriptors: Art Education, Communication (Thought Transfer), Doctoral Dissertations, Film Production

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