Bibliography: New Mexico (page 110 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include CALVIN R. ORR, James R. Pierce, Fred Lillibridge, Janine L. Twomey, Narcisa Zarate, Mary Lessman, George E. Fay, Fern H. Munro, Los Angeles Educational Evaluation Associates, and George W. Underwood.

Munro, Fern H. (1973). A Follow-up Study of Graduates of Laguna-Acoma High School Who Took ACT and/or Entered a Four-Year College Program. The myth that only the high school student who is at or near the top of his class can succeed at a four-year college is not upheld for graduates of Laguna-Acoma High School (LAHS) in New Mexico. Many sources provide accurate gradepoint averages (GPA), American College Test (ACT) scores and Rank in Class (RIC) for the LAHS students who took the ACT and/or entered a four-year college between 1964 and 1972. The GPA and RIC of the college bound students varies widely and only 26% of the LAHS graduates have taken the ACT, which probably represents an insignificant sample for measuring college retention. LAHS students do, however, fit all five categories of students who, according to ACT representatives, tend to do poorly on the test. For LAHS graduates, neither the test scores nor GPA can significantly determine who goes to college or completes a baccalaureate. Compared with retention figures supplied from the University of New Mexico (the largest university in the state), LAHS graduates have a 10% higher college retention rate than the general student body at the University. The paper concludes with a listing of 174 LAHS graduates' rank in class, grade point average, ACT scores, notations as to college entry, completion, or present enrollment, and a list of LAHS graduates who have received baccalaureate degrees. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indian Education, Bachelors Degrees, Class Rank

Willard, William (1986). The Ninth Inter-American Indian Congress Historical Overview, Wicazo Sa Review. The Ninth Congress of the Inter-American Indian Institute (IAII) was held October 28-November 1, 1985 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and was–for several reasons–a major event in the history of the indigenous people of this hemisphere. First, it was the first Congress held in the United States in the 45 years since the Institute was organized. Second, holding the Congress in New Mexico was an unofficial recognition that the origins of the Institute and Congress are in the Santa Fe- and Taos-based organization of political action to save Pueblo land and water rights in the 1920s. Third, the meeting had a larger contingent of Indian delegates and observers, and Indian participants took a larger role than in the past when non-Indian government representatives controlled the proceedings.  Fourth, the emergence of trans-national political power of indigenous people was apparent in the movement to establish a fifth committee consisting of non-governmental Indian delegates as an official component of the Congress. The IAII is recognized as a specialized Inter-American organization of the Organization of American States. Its primary purposes include dissemination of information to its 17 member nations in planning for the economic, social, education, and cultural improvement of Indians throughout the hemisphere. This paper concludes with results of a brief poll concerning the reactions to the Congress of a sampling of people connected with U.S. and Canadian universities. Descriptors: American Indians, Federal Indian Relationship, Indigenous Populations, International Cooperation

Fay, George E., Comp. (1967). Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America; Part III: The Southwest (Apache–Mohave). Occasional Publications in Anthropology Ethnology Series No. 4. The Museum of Anthropology of the University of Northern Colorado (formerly known as Colorado State College) has assembled a large number of Indian tribal charters, constitutions, and by-laws to be reproduced as a series of publications. Included in this volume are the amended charter and constitution of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Dulce, New Mexico; the amended charter and revised constitution of the Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; the amended corporate charter, amended constitution, and by-laws of the San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona; the amended constitution and by-laws of the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona; the constitution of the Cocopah Tribe, Somerton, Arizona; the corporate charter, constitution, and by-laws of the Havasupai Tribe of the Havasupai Reservation, Arizona; the constitution and by-laws of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; the amended corporate charter, amended constitution, and by-laws of the Hualapai Tribe of the Hualapai Reservation, Arizona; the corporate charter, constitution, and by-laws of the Fort McDowell Mohave-Apache Community of Arizona; and the constitution and by-laws of the Fort Mojave Tribe of the Fort Mojave Reservation of Arizona, Nevada, and California. The document contains 2 maps of various reservations.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrative Policy, American Indians, Governmental Structure, Laws

ORR, CALVIN R.; AND OTHERS (1965). SOUTHWESTERN STATES DEVELOPMENTAL PROJECT RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF ADULT AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS. A STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO IDENTIFY THE CIRCUMSTANCES AND NEEDS OF ADULT MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS AND TO DETERMINE THE EDUCATIONAL TREATMENT OF THESE NEEDS. THE STATE DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION OF ARIZONA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS PLUS THE COLLEGES OF EDUCATION OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, AND ADAMS STATE COLLEGE (COLORADO) COOPERATIVELY CONDUCTED THE STUDY. RESEARCH ASSISTANTS FROM EACH STATE WERE SELECTED. MEETINGS WERE HELD REGULARLY AND RESEARCH DUTIES DELINEATED. THE FOUR INDIVIDUAL STATE REPORTS WERE THEN DRAWN TOGETHER TO PRESENT A COMPREHENSIVE PICTURE OF THE MIGRANCY PROBLEM AND THE EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS. THE MAJOR FINDINGS ARE DISCUSSED UNDER THESE HEADINGS–(1) AMOUNT OF MIGRANCY, (2) NEW TRENDS IN MIGRANCY, (3) THE COMPOSITION OF THE MIGRANT GROUP, (4) THE CULTURE OF MIGRANTS, AND (5) THE EDUCATION OF MIGRANTS. CONCLUSIONS STATE (1) THE PROBLEMS OF MIGRANCY ARE BASICALLY CENTERED ON POVERTY, (2) MIGRANT PROBLEMS MUST BE ATTACKED IN SPECIFIC AREAS PRIMARILY WITH EDUCATION, (3) SPECIAL COUNSELING, EMPLOYMENT, HEALTH AND RECREATIONAL SERVICES, AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAMS MUST BE PROVIDED, AND (4) THE MIGRANT PROBLEMS SHOULD BE ATTACKED WITH A COOPERATIVE FOUR-STATE APPROACH. Descriptors: Education, Mexican Americans, Migrant Adult Education, Migrant Problems

Educational Evaluation Associates, Los Angeles, CA. (1972). Development and Analysis of 18 Experimental Objectives-Based Measures Administered in 1972. The development, field testing, and analysis of one component of New Mexico's statewide evaluation system, a set of 18 objectives-based tests administered to high school seniors in 56 districts, are summarized. The focus of this component is on providing: (1) information to school districts about the performance of their seniors on certain educational objectives, and (2) a data base to the New Mexico State Department of Education for the purposes of accrediting schools and evaluating State educational programs. Efforts to date are considered successful in view of the following findings: (1) a comprehensive catalogue of objectives has been developed and is ready for final field testing; (2) school personnel, students and community representatives were involved in selecting objectives with which each district is most concerned; (3) good tests were constructed to assess student performance on those objectives; (4) efficient procedures were used in administering these measures in 56 districts to a large, representative sample of seniors; (5) results of the testing indicated how the prototype measures should be modified for subsequent use; and (6) procedures were developed for reporting test results in terms of whether students are performing below, at, or above expected levels.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Accountability, Accreditation (Institutions), Data Collection

Las Cruces School District, NM. (). A Career Education Model K-12. The development of a model for career education at the K-12 levels is presented in the document. Thirty career education objectives were evaluated by teachers, counselors, parents, and career people in the Las Cruces, New Mexico, School District; they were asked to rate the objectives as to their relative importance and to determine at what grade level each objective should be presented. The 10 career education objectives of the New Mexico State Department of Education are also included. Making up the bulk of the document, career education resource materials available at the Las Cruces Public Schools' Educational Service Center are listed, described, and their grade level given. These include books, films, kits and games, and tapes. Materials available from the State Adopted Textbook List are also presented and described. Several useful career education models for possible use in the Las Cruces system are presented, and, in the concluding section, 31 abstracts of related career education documents available through ERIC Document Reproduction Service are offered.   [More]  Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Career Education, Educational Objectives, Elementary Secondary Education

Lassiter, Ruby F. (1983). Minority Access to Excellence in Higher Education. The future of New Mexico, which has a unique diverse minority population (Hispanics, Blacks, and Native Americans), is linked with how well the educational systems serve the special needs of these groups. However, these groups are the least educationally prepared to function meaningfully in and to contribute to both the contemporary society and the growth potential in New Mexico. Higher education, representing the ending integral in the educational preparation of minorities for employment and functional proficiencies, can be identified as the major opportunity to redress the problem. Unfortunately, minorities have not always fared very well in institutions of higher education and training. Representing a minority's perspective on the critical issue of minority access to excellence in higher education, this paper discusses minority access to higher education in terms of enrollment, retention, and persistence, and presents a discussion for expanding the definitions of excellence and excellence accountability. The paper draws upon the professional and life experiences of a minority student and instructor in higher education, an informal survey of 12 minority students, and a review of current literature on the status of minority education. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Access to Education, Accountability, American Indians

Twomey, Janine L.; And Others (1995). SPRE and the NMSU-A Integrated Assessment and Strategic Planning (IASP) Process: What We've Learned and Where We're Going. In September 1994, the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education issued standards for the State Postsecondary Reporting Entity (SPRE). To comply with these standards, New Mexico State University-Alamogordo (NMSU-A) decided to use its integrated Assessment and Strategic Planning (IASP) process, developed during a pre-accreditation self-study in 1993. In developing the IASP, the college decided that planning and assessment should be closely based on its mission and purpose statements, while the design and implementation of the IASP included faculty, staff, and student involvement. Since its original implementation, the IASP has led to revisions of syllabi and course content, more effective counseling services for at risk students, reallocation of campus financial resources, and greater attention towards issues related to the Americans with Disabilities and Student Right to Know and Campus Security Acts. To respond to the new SPRE standards, the IASP committee developed the SPRE Compliance Matrix, listing significant outcomes and accountability measures associated with external entities. The matrix has served as the basis for developing outcomes assessment data instruments, research questions, implementation schedules, and operating procedures. The IASP process has proven to be very effective in driving positive change at NMSU-A. (The SPRE Compliance Matrix is appended.)   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, College Outcomes Assessment, College Planning, Community Colleges

Zarate, Narcisa (1976). Predictive Factors of Academic Success for Freshmen of a Multicultural University. Factors which relate to academic success for university freshmen were investigated. Objectives were to: determine which of six independent variables were most highly related to and predictive of a 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average (GPA), the dependent variable, for two consecutive quarters; determine which combination of factors could most accurately identify students who could complete two consecutive quarters with a 2.0 GPA; compare predictive regression planes on American College Test (ACT) scores for Anglo Americans and Mexican Americans; and establish a minimum English score on the ACT for freshmen at New Mexico Highlands University (Las Vegas) with GPAs below 2.0 for remedial reading placement. Independent variables were the: ACT's English and composite scores; Nelson-Denny Reading Test's vocabulary, comprehension, and total scores; and Davis Reading Test's comprehension score. Data were gathered on 226 freshmen enrolled at New Mexico Highlands University the fall of 1974. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to determine statistically significant predictors of fall and winter GPAs. Ethnicity combined with each independent variable was used to examine an interaction in the regression for Mexican Americans. Some findings were: the ACT's composite and English scores were directly related to each quarter's GPA and different regression planes existed for Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Anglo Americans, College Entrance Examinations, College Freshmen

Underwood, George W., Comp.; Pierce, James R., Comp. (1972). Evaluation Report of the Special Scholarship in Law for American Indians. The evaluation team was contracted by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to conduct an overall independent evaluation of the American Indian Scholarship Program at the University of New Mexico. Findings include that the University of New Mexico is considered by law students and graduates as the center for legal education for Indians; that the per capita cost for law students was high during the first 4 years of the program; that the increased number of law students has decreased the per capita cost although the program has required more money during each year of operation; and that recruitment of students is very good, with students from approximately 50 tribes, coming mostly from west of the Mississippi River, and a high percentage of women students. The evaluation team made 9 recommendations, including that students' records should include the quantum of blood, manner of recruitment, and current progress; that applicants should be advised of the specific reason for rejection; that applicants should be advised at the earliest possible date that Summer Orientation is optional for well-qualified applicants; that detailed fiscal records should be maintained for each student; and that each graduate's file should reflect the date of admission to the bar and the jurisdiction.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indians, Job Placement, Law Schools

Lessman, Mary (1987). A Process Skills Field Guide to Teaching Life Science. The purpose of this document is to develop a usable science teaching guide based on the process skills methodology for the middle school life science teacher. It is intended to provide an efficient and effective tool for the interested teacher to use to develop the skills of the methodology. It could also be used as companion to the latest set of science and health competencies issued by the New Mexico State Department of Education, and as a supplement to life science textbooks. Part I, "Science in the Contemporary Classroom," presents a theoretical foundation for teaching science in a middle school classroom. Part II, "Life Science in the Las Cruces (New Mexico) Middle School Classroom," provides a model for incorporating process skills into teaching. Both parts are an effort to further the use of the process skills approach in a middle school life science program, which will be achieved as teachers come to believe that the outcomes justify the effort. A summary is provided in the form of a concept map, developed to show the relationships between the key ideas.   [More]  Descriptors: Biological Sciences, Concept Formation, Concept Mapping, Course Organization

Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. (1971). Handbook for Public Health Nurses Working with Spanish-Americans. Prepared for the use of public health nurses working with rural Spanish Americans in northern New Mexico, this handbook presents information and suggestions, in outline form, to aid these nurses in communicating with their patients with better understanding and cooperation. The handbook is based on the findings of a study conducted between September 1958 and July 1963 in Health District #1 of northern New Mexico. The study's purpose was to observe whether the quality of communication between nurse and patient and the degree of cooperation obtained from patients varied with the following 4 factors: (1) the setting in which the contact took place; (2) attributes of patients such as age, sex, language facility, and education; (3) nurse performance variables such as language used, length of the interview, and use of visual aids or written materials; and (4) discourse variables such as use of complete, appropriate arguments and "adequate" explanations. Topics discussed in the handbook include: the patients; health beliefs and linkage; sickness; respiratory, children, and traditional diseases; treatment; traditional practitioners and their areas of competence and interests; first visit; use of an interpreter; arguments; explanations; folk attitudes relevant to public health; and general rules.   [More]  Descriptors: Attitudes, Beliefs, Communication (Thought Transfer), Diseases

Hawkins, Linda; Lillibridge, Fred (1995). Development of the SPRE Compliance Matrix for NMSU-Alamogordo. In September 1994, the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education issued standards for the State Postsecondary Reporting Entity (SPRE). To comply with these standards, New Mexico State University-Alamogordo (NMSU-A) decided to use its Integrated Assessment and Strategic Planning (IASP) process, developed during a pre-accreditation self-study in 1993. To manage the increasing number of accountability requirements, the IASP committee established an Outcomes Committee to develop a SPRE compliance matrix. In developing the matrix, the Committee worked from five main goals: (1) develop an understandable matrix that would include all the standards and criteria the college faced; (2) research and develop ways to measure the effectiveness of student learning and success after the completion of a program; (3) develop a catalog of every external reporting requirement needing assessment; (4) analyze the cost of survey instruments; and (5) research and develop an effective method of measuring students' ability to complete programs. Problems encountered in developing the matrix included determining which standards may become serious issues, the cost/benefit ratio of periodically reviewing accountability standards, which standards are the most relevant for the college, and which institutional unit will be responsible for SPRE compliance. Now that the matrix has been developed, NMSU-A will need to compile other matrices for each institutional mission and purpose, implement a time-line for assessment, and design an internal audit system to ensure compliance with onsite reviews.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, College Outcomes Assessment, College Planning, Community Colleges

POTTS, ALFRED M., 2D; SIZEMORE, MAMIE (1964). DEVELOPING CURRICULUM FOR INDIAN CHILDREN. THIS WORKSHOP REPORT WAS PREPARED AS A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS OF INDIAN CHILDREN IN THE FOUR CORNERS AREA OF ARIZONA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND UTAH. A BRIEF DESCRIPTION IS GIVEN OF THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT, UP TO THEIR PRESENT STATUS, OF UTE MOUNTAIN UTES, SOUTHERN UTES, JICARILLA APACHES, PUEBLO INDIANS OF NEW MEXICO, AND NAVAJOS. THE STATED PURPOSES ARE TO PROVIDE TEACHERS WITH INSIGHTS INTO PROBLEMS OF EDUCATING THESE CHILDREN AND TO PROVIDE KNOWLEDGE OF THEIR DIFFERENT CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS, LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS, AND VALUES. PROBLEMS INHERENT IN THEIR CULTURAL TRANSLATION ARE DISCUSSED TO INDICATE AREAS OF NEEDED UNDERSTANDING, FOREMOST AMONG WHICH IS DEVELOPING THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY IN ENGLISH. SEVERAL METHODS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH ARE DESCRIBED, BOTH FOR BEGINNERS AND FOR UPPER-GRADE STUDENTS. SHORT SECTIONS DISCUSS METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES, ARITHMETIC, AND SCIENCE. PROBLEMS OF INTELLIGENCE AND ACHIEVEMENT TESTING ARE DISCUSSED. THE PUBLICATION EMPHASIZES THAT THESE CHILDREN SHOULD BE TESTED ONLY WHEN A DEFINITE PURPOSE IS TO BE SERVED AND THEN WITH GREAT CARE, SINCE MOST STANDARDIZED TESTS DO NOT INDICATE ACCURATELY THE CAPABILITIES OF INDIAN CHILDREN. MANY BIBLIOGRAPHIES, REFERENCES, AND TEACHING AIDS ARE GIVEN. THIS DOCUMENT IS ALSO AVAILABLE FROM THE CENTER FOR CULTURAL STUDIES, ADAMS STATE COLLEGE, ALAMOSA, COLORADO 81101.   [More]  Descriptors: Achievement, American Indians, Arithmetic, Behavior Patterns

O'Neal, Sandra (1987). ACT & SAT Testing, 1986-87. District Report: College Entrance Examinations. This summary report of test data provides meaningful demographic information about students in the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the American College Testing (ACT) Program tests. The district's scores for the 1986-87 year were higher on the ACT than were those of students across the nation. Mean ACT scores for the total in English, Math, Social Studies, and Natural Science, and the Composite were above national averages as they have been for 10 years. Far smaller numbers of students in New Mexico take the SAT, since the ACT is accepted by all colleges and universities in the state. Verbal scores on the SAT for district students were well above national averages, despite a slight decrease in the mean for all students to 485 from 494 the preceding year. Mathematics scores on the SAT were also well above national averages, with a mean for total students of 535, a very slight decrease from the previous year. Extensive tables provide detailed test results and information on high school grade point averages, family incomes, ethnic backgrounds, and educational aspirations. Descriptors: College Admission, College Bound Students, College Entrance Examinations, Demography

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