Bibliography: New Mexico (page 111 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Commission on Civil Rights, REBECCA LOPEZ, Michael Sullivan, Joseph O. Garcia, Donald F. Power, Nelle Moore, Katherine Powers Gallegos, Laurence Armand French, AL. Tuskegee Inst, and Michael M. Smith.

Garcia, Joseph O. (1976). Comparison of Bilingual Education Program Costs to the Regular Education Program Costs. This paper describes a study that calculated program costs for bilingual education programs operating in New Mexico school districts during 1974-75 and compared those costs to costs for regular educational programs. Data were collected through a survey of all 88 public school districts in New Mexico. Per-pupil program costs for the regular school program in grades 4-6 were calculated and comPared to Per-pupil costs for bilingual programs in each district. When districts were clustered into eight groups, based on total district enrollment, bilingual Program costs ranged from 37 percent of regular program costs (for districts with enrollments under 200) to 116 percent of regular program costs (for districts with enrollments from 4,000 to 7,500). The statewide average showed bilingual programs cost 103 percent as much as the regular educational program in grades 4-6). A series of tables present program cost and enrollment data for each district, as well as average figures for different sizes of districts and figures for the state as a whole. A sample survey questionnaire and samples of the various worksheets used to analyze the survey data are included in the appendix.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Cost Indexes, Elementary Secondary Education, Expenditure per Student

Whitney, Terry N.; And Others (1994). The Study of the Enrollment Growth Factor. Final Report. This paper presents findings of a study that examined the New Mexico school-finance formula. Specifically, the study assessed the adequacy of the enrollment growth factor (EGF) and its differential impact on New Mexico school districts that grow at different rates. An EGF refers to some type of weighting in a state's basic aid formula to reflect higher operating costs associated with increased student enrollment in a school district. The study examined the changes in enrollment patterns between 1986-87 and 1993-94 and identified 5 types of district growth: fast, moderate, down-up, mixed, declining, and others. It also examined changes in district teacher-pupil ratios by growth group and size and changes in districts' actual spending levels. Data indicate that growth funds had little to do with changes in the pupil-teacher ratios. It was also hard to determine what impact, if any, growth funds had and what need, if any, there is for such funds to be provided. A conclusion is that growth funds do not serve any real purpose as they are currently allocated. If continued, they should be targeted more carefully in the future, taking into consideration the individual characteristics of school districts other than yearly changes in enrollment. It is concluded that there is no research to support or refute higher operating costs for school districts with rapidly growing enrollments. Seven tables and two figures are included. A summary table compares the enrollment-growth finance formulas of other states. Descriptors: Educational Equity (Finance), Educational Finance, Elementary Secondary Education, Enrollment Projections

Sullivan, Michael; And Others (1993). Rural Communities Communicating: The Emergence of Two-Way Interactive Video in Southwestern, Rural, Small Schools. In three southwestern states, grassroots movements of citizens, educators, and local businesses developed and implemented two-way interactive television projects in their schools and communities. A descriptive multiple case study design was used to examine six project sites in New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma. Research questions were categorized in a framework that may serve as a prototype for project replication; categories included the context of project development, concerns or needs that sparked the project, the shared vision, community and administrative support, planning and resource allocation, monitoring and problem solving, and barriers to implementation and ongoing support. Data sources included extensive interviews, classroom observation during site visits, and documents and records. Findings cover: (1) the specific characteristics of two-way interactive full-motion video that make it attractive and feasible for use with rural at-risk student populations; (2) the electronic classroom model; (3) fiber-optic technology; (4) cost categories; (5) details of the development of the most mature project, the Oklahoma Panhandle Shar-Ed Video Network; and (6) additional events unique to the other five projects. Other projects were the New Mexico Eastern Plains Interactive TV Cooperative, the TeleCommUNITY Network, North Texas Educational Network, East Texas Learning Interactive Network Consortium, and the Dell City Initiative. Guidelines are presented for implementation of similar projects.   [More]  Descriptors: Case Studies, Community Action, Distance Education, Electronic Classrooms

Barkley, Daniel; Shane, Jackie (1995). Access is Ownership: The People Become the Public Printer. This paper discusses the development of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) and the increasing trend among federal agencies to reduce printed output and distribute information in electronic form–on floppy disks, CD ROMs, and, since the development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII), the Internet. Many libraries do not have the necessary combination of hardware, software, and requisite experience to enable users to access the electronic documents. In addition, many users do not possess the technical skills to utilize the information fully. If access is ownership, then information access must be ubiquitous. Depository libraries must continue to provide reliable, free, unrestricted access to all public documents regardless of the medium or location. They need to address the questions of who bears the responsibility of storage and archiving and whether the privatization of information access is feasible. Relevant developments in the state of New Mexico include four Internet access projects: New Mexico Technet, the Crown Point Project, La Plaza Telecommunity, and ZiaNet. (Contains 24 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Information, Depository Libraries, Electronic Publishing, Freedom of Information

Gallegos, Katherine Powers, Ed. (1969). Indio and Hispano Child: Improving His Self Image. Prepared under a Title IV Civil Rights program grant, this document consists of social studies units for grades 1 and 4, suggestions for a culturally oriented arts program, biographical sketches of cultural models, and brief historical sketches of communities in the area of Los Lunas, New Mexico. The purpose of the units of instruction and related materials is to build a better self-image on the part of pupils belonging to minority groups. The social studies unit for grade 1 is a comparative study of family life in 3 cultures: Indian, Mexican or Spanish, and Anglo. The unit stresses that people of different cultures can live and work together appreciating what each has contributed from its heritage. The social studies unit for grade 4 is a comparative study of the role that those 3 cultures have played in the development of New Mexico. This unit attempts to promote attitudes, appreciation, and understanding that will contribute to a blending of the 3 cultures into a plural Southwest culture.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Anglo Americans, Art Expression, Cross Cultural Studies

Tuskegee Inst., AL. (1970). National Center for the Training of Educational Resource Agents to Serve Rural Minorities. The Preparation of Problem Solving/Development/Diffusion Personnel to Serve Rural/Minority/Culturally Limited Populations. A blueprint for Educational Resource Agents (ERA's) has been compiled by a consortium consisting of the National Federation for the Improvement of Rural Education, Tuskegee Institute, New Mexico State University, University of North Dakota, Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Appalachia Educational Lab., and Southeastern Education Lab. A 42-month cooperative thrust is proposed to train 48 recruits as ERA's. Design stresses effective communication within a rural, culturally limited, minority school setting with a high degree of generalizability for the urban counterpart. Program elements include performance criteria/accountability; 1-week key staff training at Tuskegee Institute; 2-week common core teaching; rotation of participants through all field, lab, and campus components; 4-week rotational internship in rural schools and kindred agencies settings; and a trends seminar. Recruits from 3 test states with heavy minority populations (Alabama, Black; New Mexico, Chicano/Indian; and North Dakota, Indian) will be educators who are high communicators having peer acceptance from target populations. Purposive dissemination and internal-external evaluation are built-in. National needs and job opportunities for ERA's have been established via the Clark and Hopkins survey. Descriptors: American Indians, Blacks, Change Agents, Diffusion

Valencia, Atilano A. (1969). Identification and Assessment of Ongoing Educational and Community Programs for Spanish Speaking People. A Report Submitted to the Southwest Council of La Raza, Phoenix, Arizona. Synoptic reports on 16 selected educational and community programs for Spanish-speaking people are presented in this document. Each report consists of a brief description of the project, an assessment of the program, and recommendations for dissemination and implementation of the project model. Programs reviewed include: (1) The Good Samaritan Center's Bilingual Education Program, San Antonio, Texas; (2) Bilingual Follow Through Project, Corpus Christi, Texas; (3) The Coral Way Bilingual Program, Miami, Florida; (4) Teaching Spanish To The Spanish-Speaking Child–A Western States Small Schools Project in Pecos, New Mexico; (5) ESL/Bilingual Demonstration Project Center, San Diego, California; (6) The San Antonio Bilingual Demonstration And Dissemination Center, San Antonio, Texas; (7) Laredo Bilingual Program, Laredo, Texas; (8) Spanish Arts Program For Mexican Americans, Merced, California; (9) Teacher Excellence For Economically Deprived and Culturally Differentiated Americans, San Antonio, Texas; (10) Teacher Education Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; (11) A Video Oral English Instructional Approach For Non-English Speaking Adults With A Spanish Surname, Albuquerque, New Mexico; and (12) Proteus Adult Training Center, Visalia, California.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Bilingual Education, Bilingual Students, Community Programs

Moore, Nelle (1996). Using the Malcolm Baldrige Criteria To Improve Quality in Higher Education. This report discusses the Malcolm Baldrige (MB) Education Criteria, the award process, and the experiences of one institution, San Juan College (New Mexico), that received an award at the state level. The Baldrige Criteria are based on 11 core values: (1) learning-centered education; (2) leadership; (3) continuous improvement and organizational learning; (4) faculty and staff participation and development; (5) partnership development; (6) design quality and prevention; (7) management by fact; (8) long-range view of the future; (9) public responsibility and citizenship; (10) fast response; and (11) results orientation. An institution under consideration for an award under the Baldrige Criteria must submit to the awarding agency a self-assessment report written around the seven MB Criteria providing the framework for the core values, including leadership; information and analysis; strategic and operational planning; human resource development and management; education and business process management; school performance results; and student focus and satisfaction. In 1994 and 1995, San Juan College participated in the Quality New Mexico Award process. This process uses teams of evaluators who read, score, and write feedback comments on reports of organizations under consideration for an award. This document concludes that the Baldrige Criteria have provided a conceptual framework that focused the action planning process of San Juan College.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Awards, Business Education, Change Strategies

LOPEZ, REBECCA (1967). UNDERSTANDING–SANTO DOMINGO'S RX FOR THE "CULTURAL SHOCK.". THE SANTO DOMINGO, NEW MEXICO, PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLS 720 INDIAN PUPILS IN GRADES 1 THROUGH 8 AND UTILIZES 30 TEACHERS IN ITS INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM. ALTHOUGH THE PUPILS COME FROM A CULTURE WHICH IS UNFAMILIAR TO MOST OF THEIR TEACHERS, A PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF THE SCHOOL IS THAT THE LIFE, CUSTOMS, BELIEFS, AND CULTURE OF THE INDIAN CHILDREN WILL BE MAINTAINED AND REINFORCED THROUGH THEIR EDUCATION, AND THAT CULTURAL AND LOCAL NEEDS OF THE PUPIL WILL BE MET BY THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM. IN ORDER TO FULFILL THIS OBJECTIVE, A TEACHER ORIENTATION PROGRAM, ORGANIZED ON A CONTINUING BASIC HAS BEEN INITIATED AT SANTO DOMINGO. THIS PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED THROUGH AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH, DRAWING HEAVILY UPON THE WORKS OF OUTSTANDING ANTHROPOLOGISTS, HISTORIANS, EDUCATORS, SOCIOLOGISTS, AND LINGUISTIC AUTHORITIES. IN ANOTHER STEP TO MEET THE PREVIOUSLY CITED OBJECTIVE, THE CURRICULUM HAS BEEN DEVELOPED AROUND THE COMMUNICATIVE ARTS, ESPECIALLY THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. EMPHASIS IS ALSO PLACE ON SUCH SUBJECTS AS ANTHROPOLOGY, LITERATURE, AND HISTORY OF CULTURALLY-DIFFERENT PEOPLE. THIS ARTICLE APPEARS IN THE "NEW MEXICO SCHOOL REVIEW," APRIL 1967, PP. 12-14, 40.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Anthropology, Cultural Differences, Culture

French, Laurence Armand (1992). A Comparison of Two States' MR Court Challenges. This paper examines two states operating under Federal Court Orders concerning deinstitutionalization of individuals with mental retardation. New Hampshire is presented as a state in which sociopolitical realities have interfered with efforts to monitor the quality of care, as the Laconia State School was closed for economic reasons, thereby interrupting staff development, quality assurance, realistic case management, and the availability of quality treatment. Efforts to ensure quality of care for institutionalized individuals in New Mexico led to the court ruling that the State is under no constitutional duty to provide substantive services for those within its borders who are not institutionalized. The paper points out that often clinical/legal reasons are cited as the reasons for deinstitutionalization (such as least restrictive environment), when the actual reasons are economic or political. The paper also cites the lack of cultural sensitivity available in either institutional or community settings. The paper concludes that New Mexico must be willing to guarantee that care is provided across domains, including the community, in the areas of food, shelter, clothing, medical care, safety, and protection from abuse.   [More]  Descriptors: Community Programs, Court Litigation, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Differences

Chicano Communications Center, Albuquerque, NM. (1976). 450 Years of Chicano History in Pictures/450 Anos del Pueblo Chicano. For use with junior and senior high school students, this book presents more than 250 drawings and pictures, with an introduction and brief texts in English and Spanish, depicting 450 years of Chicano history. The book covers: Mexico before the Spanish Conquests, Spain's colonization of the Southwest, the United States war on Mexico, events in the Southwest after the U.S. take-over, the Mexican Revolution, the increased migration from Mexico, the Chicano's role in building agriculture and industry, labor struggles of the 1900's, the Depression, World War II and Chicano participation, and the Chicano "movement" since the 1960's. Among the events covered are: El Grito de Dolores, the El Paso Salt War of 1877, the 1933 "riots" at Pixley (California), the Great Pecan Strike, the 1951 Miners Strike at Silver City (New Mexico), the Grape Strike, and the Farah Strike in Texas and New Mexico. Among the Chicanos discussed are: Father Miguel Hidalgo, Jose Maria Morelos, Joaquin Murieta, Tiburcio Vasquez, Elfego Baca, Gregorio Cortez, Carmen Serdan, Dolores Jimenez y Muro, Francisco "Pancho" Villa, Emiliano Zapata, Valentina Ramirez, Emma Tenayucca, Reies Lopez Tijerina, Olga Talamante, Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, Ruben Salazar, and Inez Garcia. Descriptors: American History, Community Leaders, Cultural Context, Culture Conflict

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. (1985). Improving the Articulation/Transfer Process between Two- and Four-Year Institutions. A collaborative project involving four states in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education region was conducted to develop an on-line student information system allowing students and their advisors access to current information about course and credit tranfer from two- to four-year institutions. Each state (Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico) has a high concentration of minority students in community colleges who transfer at lower rates than other students. Project activities expressly targeted the improvement of the articulation/transfer process. Three states moved toward the successful development of integrated student information systems. In California, a microcomputer system was developed for use in newly funded transfer centers. In Arizona, Maricopa Community College District developed a course equivalency/degree audit program for its digital computers. In Colorado, a different configuration of software and hardware is being utilized to design an integrated comprehensive student information system at Colorado State University. New Mexico was not successful. The study report includes information on pre-grant activities, timelines, costs, and project results for each state. Appendices (the bulk of the document) include a final evaluation report on the project, materials from a project workshop, sample articulation agreements, Arizona's "Handbook for Articulation Task Forces," and materials developed for specific articulation activities.   [More]  Descriptors: Articulation (Education), Community Colleges, Cooperative Programs, Educational Counseling

Smith, Michael M. (1990). The Mexican Immigrant Press beyond the Borderlands: The Case of "El Cosmopolita," 1914-19, Great Plains Quarterly. From 1914 to 1919 El Cosmopolita–a Spanish language newspaper in Kansas City–served as an organ of ethnic unity and cultural reinforcement for the immigrant Hispanic community, carried news from Mexico, pushed the agenda of the Constitutionalists in the Mexican Revolution, and advertised the Anglo owner's Mexican businesses. Descriptors: Ethnicity, Immigrants, Local History, Mexican American History

Power, Donald F. (1989). Commentary on "National Education Policies for Aboriginal Peoples.", Canadian Journal of Native Education. Reviews educational policies for indigenous peoples in the United States, Canada, Australia, Scandinavia, New Zealand, Mexico, Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and South Africa. Suggests that the continued survival of indigenous people requires cultural equality, achieved through self-determined, culturally relevant education; plus cooperation with more technologically advanced peoples. Descriptors: Comparative Education, Educational Policy, Elementary Secondary Education, Foreign Countries

Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC. (1972). Methodological Appendix of Research Methods Employed in the Mexican American Education Study. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights released Mexican American Education Study findings in a series of documents: (1) "The Ethnic Isolation of Mexican Americans in the Public Schools of the Southwest" (ED 052 849), "The Unfinished Education" (ED 056 821), and "The Excluded Student" (ED 062 069). The research methods employed in the study are described here. Phase 1 utilized a stratified random sampling of school districts (300 or more pupils or 1,204 districts) in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. Results from 3 questionnaires were tabulated by state, school grade level, ethnic composition of school, and size of district enrollment. Phase 2 used schools (575) which enrolled over 10% Mexican Americans. One questionnaire was sent to district superintendents, and 1 to a random stratified sample of school principals. The data from superintendents were tabulated by state, enrollment size, proportion of Mexican American enrollment, and grade levels served. The tabulated data from principals included the above data, as well as information on the non-Mexican American composition and the socioeconomic status of the school. In Phase 3, limited to California, New Mexico, and Texas, areas having substantial Mexican American enrollment and encompassing rural, urban, and suburban schools were randomly chosen. Grades 4, 8, 10, and 12 were then visited in these schools, using 6 instruments to interview, observe, and record factual data. Tabulations were by state, grade, and Mexican American enrollment. Included are 6 tables, and 11 appendixes.   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Rights, Educational Research, Educational Researchers, Elementary Education

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