Bibliography: New Mexico (page 112 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Institute for Educational Leadership, Philadelphia Recruitment Leadership and Training Inst, BCEL Brief, Nagesh Rao, Inc. National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Elnabeth Grau, Dan Vicenti, Luiza B. Amodeo, Stephen W. Stile, and Lars G. Bjork.

deRosa, Richard J., Ed. (1992). [Qualities and Strengths of Rural Schools.], Journal of the Assembly of Rural Teachers of English (ARTE). This journal contains the following articles pertaining to English instruction in rural schools: (1) "Different, To Be Sure" (Nathan James Weate) compares rural and urban students and finds rural students to have strong family cohesiveness, strong moral values, and diversified interests; (2) "An Elevating Experience" (Dorothy Trusock) describes a freshman writing experience which involves researching travel destinations and writing and telling about an imaginary journey; (3) "Outdoor World" (Craig Akey) details an elective English course, "Outdoor Literature" which uses various novels and writing assignments to discuss endangered species, sportsman's ethics, ecological relationships, and the question of hunting; (4) "Expanding Audiences in a Rural Classroom" (Richard Lessard) relates the experiences of a junior English class in reading and reacting to correspondence with a group of inner city fourth grade students; and (5) "Window: Teaching in Rural, Scenic, Tricultural Northern New Mexico" (Alfredo Lujan) uses the analogy of the computer "window" to bring glimpses of his Pojoaque, New Mexico environment through his eyes and the eyes of his middle school students.   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Education, Elementary Secondary Education, English Instruction, Learning Activities

Amodeo, Luiza B.; And Others (1981). A Potpourri of Issues Relevant to Rural and Minority Women in the Southwest. Focusing on issues and concerns pertaining to teaching and counseling rural women and minority women living in rural environments, the four papers aim to promote a better understanding and more realistic picture of conditions affecting rural/minority women. "Factors Influencing Educational and Occupational Choices of Rural/Minority Women" briefly explores historical and contemporary factors influencing educational and occupational choices of rural/minority females and presents possible approaches for amelioration of the current situation. In "Educational and Career Goals of Rural Women," common problems faced by rural women are briefly discussed: a conservative orientation toward sex roles and appropriate lifestyles; a conflict between the traditional demands of rural culture and contemporary pressure to enter the labor force; lack of skills to qualify for better jobs; and low aspirations and expectations. "A Teaching Style Profile of Women in Rural Schools of New Mexico" describes a 1980-81 pilot study on the teaching style of 50 rural female teachers in New Mexico. The last paper, "Pictorials in Social Studies Textbooks: Perpetuating Sexism and Racism," reports a study which measured whether increasing social attention to racial and sexual biases contained in textbooks influenced the content of text and books used in four school districts with bilingual/bicultural programs. Descriptors: Academic Aspiration, Career Choice, Culture Conflict, Educational Counseling

BCEL Brief (1991). Health Care Industry. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series. This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy in the health care industry and lists program contacts. The following 35 organizations operate basic skills upgrading programs for health care workers: American Hospital Association; Chinese American Civic Association; Massachusetts Department of Employment and Training; BostonWorks; Continuing Education Institute; Consortium for Worker Education; Health and Hospital Workers Union District Council 1199; Service Employees International Union Local 144; City University of New York; Patient Learning Associates; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Boston Private Industry Council; University of New England; Division of Adult Education and Literacy, U.S. Department of Education; Kanawha County Adult Basic Education Program (West Virginia); National Cancer Institute; Push Literacy Action Now; Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Kansas City; Washington Hospital Center; Brigham and Women's Hospital; Children's Hospital (Washington, D.C.); Greater Southeast Community Hospital; PAVE, The Education and Training Foundation; Middlesex Community College; New Mexico State University; Philadelphia Hospital and Health Care District 1199C; American Optometric Association; University of Arizona; Center for Literacy; Lafayette Adult Reading Academy; Long Island University; Clara Maass Medical Center; Massachusetts Department of Health and Hospitals; New York State Psychiatric Institute; and University of New Mexico. Each listing may include the following: organization name, acronym, program description, address, and telephone number. Nine annotated references are included. Descriptors: Adult Literacy, Basic Skills, Grants, Health Occupations

Bjork, Lars G. (1983). Political Action and the Development of a Research University. The manner in which the University of New Mexico developed from an undergraduate teaching institution in the direction of a graduate research university during 1967-1978 was studied, using an ethnohistorical research approach. A combination of qualitative research commonly associated with the participant-observation approach was employed. A large number of documents, such as memoranda, letters, and written reports, were analyzed to reconstruct the historical events at the college during the study period. Informal interviews were also conducted. The findings indicate that the university engaged in political action as a means through which it could protect its research interests, secure resources, and adapt to changes in its external research support environment. During 1968-1978, the college administration pursued three avenues of support for faculty research: retaining a portion of the overhead charged to the general budget, reducing teaching loads for selected faculty, and establishing the Office of the Vice-President for Research. To develop external support for faculty research and development during 1971-1978, the university increased its contacts with the directors of funding agencies, the state government, and New Mexico's congressional delegation. Descriptors: Change Strategies, College Faculty, Educational History, Financial Support

Albuquerque Technical Vocational Inst., NM. (1995). Center for Advanced Technology Training (CATT) Feasibility Study. A study of the feasibility of establishing a Center for Advanced Technology Training (CATT) at the Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute (TVI Community College, New Mexico) was conducted by members of the Albuquerque business community, government representatives, and college administrators. Phase 1 of the study was an examination of the conceptual feasibility of the CATT, and Phase 2 was the initial implementation plan. The Phase 1 study found a clear gap in the ability of the TVI Community College to meet the needs of the growing economy and employers in the Albuquerque area. Area businesses and industry, as well as the college's administration, found the proposed CATT to be viable and innovative. The second phase continued the team approach of the first phase to plan for: (1) an industry hub and service center; (2) teaching factories; (3) program incubators and catalysts; (4) outreach offices/extension services; and (5) educators and gateways to work. Specific plans for management are detailed. Four appendixes list the workgroup members, present detailed concepts of new technologies and skills, discuss key characteristics of CATT models, and offer a list of New Mexico occupations generally requiring postsecondary education. Four unnumbered tables in the text and three in the appendixes provide supplemental information about the planned CATT. (Contains 24 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Technology, Feasibility Studies, Needs Assessment, School Business Relationship

Recruitment Leadership and Training Inst., Philadelphia, PA. (1975). Bridging the Gap: Recruiting Indian People for Careers in Education. Since there are large gaps between the culture, economy, and education of Native Americans and mainstream Americans, the recruitment and training of Native Americans as paraprofessionals in the schools appears to be a promising opportunity to deal with all three gaps simultaneously. Three model programs which are currently bridging these gaps with increasing levels of complexity are: (1) the Rural Indian Education Program sponsored by the Cherokee Nation and the Tulsa Public School District; (2) the Teacher Aide Project sponsored by Oklahoma City University; and (3) the On-site Pueblo Personnel Training Program sponsored by the All Indian Pueblo Council and the University of New Mexico. The Tulsa program recruits and trains parents and other Indian adults as classroom paraprofessionals capable of undertaking very specific tasks. The Oklahoma City program goes beyond such objectives by providing university classes for its paraprofessionals and giving college credits for courses taught on-site throughout the State. The New Mexico program is the most comprehensive of the three in that it is planned to encourage Indian paraprofessionals to complete a sequence of courses leading to an Associate degree and to move on to advanced degrees. In the Pueblo program, most instruction is conducted in the schools in which the aides work.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Career Opportunities, Cultural Differences, Educational Programs

National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Inc. (1991). Prevention in Action. 1991 Exemplary Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Programs. Eight exemplary programs for preventing alcohol and other drug abuse are presented in this document. These programs are summarized: (1) SUPER II Early Intervention Program, Atlanta, Georgia, which serves primarily inner-city youth ages 11-17 and their families through community agencies, juvenile courts, alternative schools, and public housing; (2) NaKeiki O Ka'Aina ("Children of the Land"), Wai'anae, Hawaii, in which children from a rural Hawaiian community work on a farm; (3) Native Hawaiian Substance Abuse Prevention Project, Honolulu, Hawaii, which builds on a foundation of preventive and socialized techniques based on Native Hawaiian values, practices, and culture; (4) School of Opportunities, Kokomo, Indiana, an alternative education program for youth in high-risk environments in grades 6-12; (5) Children's after School Achievement Program, Holland, Michigan, which serves the needs of more than 100 disadvantaged, minority students in grades 1-8; (6) Solid Ground Program, Carson City, Nevada, which encourages juvenile probationers to get involved in positive experiences; (7) Teen Outreach Program (TOP), Bridgeton, New Jersey, which recruits and trains peer educators from a high-risk adolescent population; and (8) Center for Indian Youth Program Development, Albuquerque, New Mexico, which provides alcohol and other drug prevention services to culturally diverse children, youth, and their families in rural New Mexico.   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Adults, Alcohol Abuse, Delinquency

Schnorr, Janice M. (1985). Field-Based Rural Special Education Programs in the Center for Excellence in Education. Evolution of Northern Arizona University's new Center for Excellence in Education (the former College of Education) is traced and its interaction with the university, schools, and public agencies is illustrated through discussion of two special education training programs. An overview is provided of the numerous changes resulting from the reorganization and from the leadership changes needed to develop the Center; an organizational chart is included. The presentation centers on the partnerships and strategies developed through two special education training programs designed to prepare master's level special educators from rural areas in Arizona and New Mexico. Detailed descriptions of the two programs–the Navajo Special Education Teacher Development Program and the Rural Special Education Project–cover course descriptions, course meeting schedules, stipend options, and areas of certification. It is noted that 26 Navajo graduate students are currently completing courses through the combined field-based and on-campus program and that 11 graduate students from rural areas in Arizona and New Mexico have been funded through the Rural Special Education Project. One course–Bilingual Multicultural Aspects of Special Education–which was specifically developed upon request of the Navajo Tribe is discussed in detail. Commentaries from the Center's leaders are presented in the appendix. Descriptors: Administrative Change, American Indian Education, Course Descriptions, Higher Education

Grau, Elnabeth; Shaughnessy, Michael F. (1987). The Four Day School Week: An Investigation and Analysis. Students in about 100 schools in 10 states attend classes 4 days a week, for all or part of the school year. A growing number of rural schools, faced with declining enrollments and diminishing state aid, are experimenting with this schedule. Benefits of the schedule include lower energy and transportation costs and lower absenteeism among students and teachers. Holding classes 7.5 hours a day, 4 days a week, provides the same amount of instructional time as the traditional schedule, but with more time-on-task and less wasted time. Students have had no real problems adjusting to the longer day. Teacher, student, and parent attitudes toward the 4-day week have been generally positive. The 10 New Mexico school districts operating on the 4-day week reported cost savings of 10-25% on fuel, electricity, and transportation; standardized achievement test scores comparable to state norms; and a collective dropout rate of 3.3% (versus 8.1% statewide). In the 12 Colorado districts on the 4-day schedule, students showed some gains and some losses in academic achievement, with no clear evidence that student achievement was suffering. This report contains 11 references and the third, fifth, and eighth grade scores on the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills for 16 small New Mexico school districts (including 7 on the 4-day schedule) from 1982-83 to 1985-86.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Educational Assessment, Elementary Secondary Education, Retrenchment

Stile, Stephen W.; And Others (1991). Post-Preschool Placement of Young Students with Developmental Disabilities Exiting Public Special Education Preschool Programs. Final Report. This study investigated initial placements, current placements, and stability of placements for 1,646 graduates of special education preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-olds with developmental disabilities from 61 New Mexico school districts. Subjects graduated in four waves from 1986-87 through 1989-90. Major findings were that 10 percent of the graduates were initially placed in regular education, 40 percent in regular education with support, and 43 percent in self-contained classrooms. Current placements indicated slight shifts to 15 percent in regular education, 33 percent in regular education with support, and 53 percent in self-contained classrooms. Overall, the stability rate was 90 percent. Six recommendations are made, including: (1) increase the number of placements in regular education or regular education with support; (2) increase the number of mainstreamed or integrated preschool settings; (3) place students in regular education with support in cases of doubt; (4) "red-flag" files of children placed in special education for "1 more year"; (5) initiate a "tracking system" across New Mexico districts; and (6) pursue funding needed to continue the preschool longitudinal study. Includes nine references. Descriptors: Decision Making, Developmental Disabilities, Longitudinal Studies, Mainstreaming

KNOWLTON, CLARK S. (1965). BILINGUALISM–A PROBLEM OR AN ASSET. THE AUTHOR DISCUSSES THE PROBLEMS RATHER THAN THE ASSETS ASSOCIATED WITH BILINGUALISM IN NEW MEXICO AND TEXAS SCHOOLS. HE STATES THAT MANY SPANISH-SPEAKING STUDENTS DO NOT LEARN BECAUSE THE SCHOOLS ARE BIASED AGAINST THEM IN THE FOLLOWING WAYS–(1) THE LOW TAXING ABILITY OF THE COMMUNITY PROVIDES ONLY FOR ILL-STAFFED AND ILL-EQUIPPED SCHOOLS, (2) THE STUDENTS CANNOT LEARN OTHER SUBJECT MATTER, AS EXPECTED, BEFORE THEY MASTER ENGLISH, AND (3) SPANISH-SPEAKING CHILDREN LEARN TO REGARD THEIR NATIVE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE AS INFERIOR TO THAT OF THE ANGLO-AMERICANS. THE AUTHOR CONCLUDES THAT THE SCHOOLS SHOULD TEACH THESE STUDENTS IN THEIR NATIVE LANGUAGE WHILE THEY ARE MASTERING ENGLISH, TO ENABLE THEM TO LEARN OTHER SUBJECT MATTER EARLIER AND DEVELOP AN APPRECIATION OF THEIR NATIVE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. HE SUGGESTS THAT CREATIVE SYNTHESIS OF THE SOUTHWEST CULTURES WILL PRODUCE CLASSROOMS IN WHICH THE FULLEST POTENTIAL OF THE ANGLO-AMERICAN, MEXICAN-AMERICAN, AND INDIAN CULTURES WILL BE ATTAINED. THIS IS A SPEECH PREPARED FOR DELIVERY TO THE MEETING OF STAFF AND FACULTY OF ANTHONY SCHOOL DISTRICT (ANTHONY, NEW MEXICO, DECEMBER 8, 1965).   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingualism, Cultural Background, Cultural Influences, English (Second Language)

Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies. (1982). Corporate Use of Research Libraries. SPEC Kit 88. This report contains a series of documents from, and a summary of responses to a telephone survey of, 23 research libraries. Documents and survey responses cover services to the business community by both members and nonmembers of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Introductory materials include a summary of relevant issues, a copy of the questionnaire with responses given, and a list of current services offered to business and industry by research libraries. The main body of the report contains 26 documents prepared at 16 libraries, including: (1) descriptions of corporate service programs at Pennsylvania State University, the University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cornell University, and Long Island University; (2) examples of records and statistics from the University of Michigan, Southern Methodist University, Lehigh University, the University of New Mexico, Cornell, and MIT; (3) documents concerning needs assessment and services from Stanford University, the John Crerar Library, MIT, Long Island University, and the New York Public Library; and (4) publicity materials from the University of Colorado, Rice University, the University of New Mexico, Georgia Institute of Technology, Southern Methodist University, Lehigh University, the University of Wisconsin, MIT, and the University of Michigan. An evaluation sheet for this ARL Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) kit is also provided. Descriptors: Academic Libraries, Business, Fees, Higher Education

Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC. (1995). Putting Children First: State-Level Collaboration between Education and Health. A Special Report of the National Health & Education Consortium. Recognizing that unhealthy children cannot learn and that an uneducated child will become a drain on society, this report describes the efforts of the National Health and Education Consortium (NHEC) to promote collaboration among the health and education professions to improve the health of children. The report describes the creation and operation of state health/education consortia in Florida, Maryland, New Mexico, and Texas. The report recommends that leaders interested in creating, merging, or formalizing state consortia should: (1) select leadership with political access; (2) convene a formal steering committee; (3) build strong corporate involvement; (4) develop a clear mission and goals, and ensure accountability; (5) build the publics' awareness of the importance of linking health and education; (6) promote grassroots interest and activities; (7) capitalize on momentum; (8) maintain flexibility; (9) evaluate the effectiveness of the initiative; and (10) seek core funding early. Six appendixes include: a list of selected collaboration resources; NHEC founding organizations and members; and steering committee rosters and sample agendas from the Florida, Maryland, New Mexico, and Texas health/education consortia. A list of NHEC publications is included. Descriptors: Child Health, Consortia, Early Childhood Education, Educational Policy

Vicenti, Dan; And Others (1972). The Law of the People (Dine Bibee Haz'Aannii): A Bicultural Approach to Legal Education for Navajo Students, Volume 4. Volume 4 of a 4-volume bilingual bicultural law-related curriculum examines Navajo community life as it is affected by certain laws. Getting a job, obtaining assistance from welfare and other agencies, and preserving one's individual rights as an employee or as a student are all aspects of daily living with important legal ramifications. This unit explores each of these relationships, as well as important laws that help to shape them. Some of the laws discussed are Social Security, workmen's compensation, unemployment compensations, the food stamp program and other government health and child care programs, as well as child employment regulations in the State of New Mexico. The casebook contains examples of actual instances which are to be utilized in teaching this unit, but it is also suggested that the teacher write the Employment Security Commission and other Federal and State agencies to get forms and applications to be used in the classroom as teaching aids. Video tapes on food stamps and on the fair hearing process are available from the Ramah Bilingual Project (New Mexico), and should also be used in conjunction with this unit. Descriptors: American Indian Culture, Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Case Studies

Rao, Nagesh; And Others (1995). Effects of Mothers against Drunk Driving's (MADD's) Victim Impact Panels on First-Time DWI Offenders: Some Initial Results. A study assessed the effects of victim impact panels (VIP) on first-time DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) offenders in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The VIP is an emotional presentation by the victim or their parents about how they were injured or their child was killed by a drunk driver. Subjects, 350 first-time offenders participated in a Mothers against Drunk Driving victim impact panel, took both pretest and posttest questionnaires measuring emotional state, perception of the riskiness of drinking and driving, and intention to drink and drive. Information was elicited as to the socio-demographic characteristics of the subjects. Typical VIP participant is a working-class male with a fairly modest income. Findings contradict the stereotype of DWI offenders as alcoholics–rather, they appear to be individuals who make poor choices. Participants reported being strongly affected by the VIP sessions. Most said they would not drink and drive again and were convinced that drinking and driving was very risky. Drinking and driving is a serious social and health problem, and several strategies have been tried nationally and locally in New Mexico (the leader in drinking and driving fatalities in the United States) to reduce DWI recidivism. Legal interventions have only provided short-term deterrence to drinking and driving. The predominantly informal approach used by DWI schools appears to be ineffective in reducing DWI recidivism. (Includes 5 tables and 1 figure of data; contains 30 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Attitude Change, Change Strategies, Communication Research, Community Education

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