Bibliography: New Mexico (page 118 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Don L. MacCarter, Orlando Herrera, Doug Swift, Stephen W. Stile, RICHARD P. WILLIAMS, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Library, Darril Goodman, Gerald Cunico, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, and Pat Oldham.

New Mexico State Library, Santa Fe. (1992). New Mexico State Library Rural Services Study. A study of the information needs of rural services clientele was undertaken in New Mexico to define the services that the state library should provide. A survey about information needs was prepared and mailed to post office box holders, randomly selected, in rural areas of the state. In all, 1,200 surveys were distributed. Responses were received from 16 percent (195). Ninety percent of those returning surveys use public, school, or college library services. Reading interests cover a broad range of subjects and reading levels, and are consistent throughout the state. One hundred and thirteen households use the bookmobiles, and most prefer afternoon stops. Respondents indicated that videos were the service they would most like to see added, with books on tape and large print materials following. Costs of operating the bookmobiles were also calculated. The survey and cost study resulted in recommendations for improvement of the services and facilities, mainly new bookmobiles, to improve rural services. A timeline for accomplishing the recommendations is included. Appendixes contain the questionnaire, an analysis of responses, cost data, statistics for 1991-92, and a vehicle inventory.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, Bookmobiles, Cost Effectiveness, Library Collections

Information Transfer, Inc., Rockville, MD. (1978). Proceedings of the 1978 National Conference on Technology for Energy Conservation (Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 24-27, 1978). This publication contains the proceedings of the National Conference on Technology for Energy Conservation held in January 1978, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The 112 papers included are organized under the following topics: (1) Legal Considerations; (2) Energy from Biomass; (3) Energy Conservation in Agriculture; (4) Status of Energy Conservation; (5) Energy Conservation in Institutions; (6) Utilities; (7) Principles of Pricing; (8) Solar Energy; (9) Alternate Sources of Energy; (10) Environmental Considerations; (11) Energy Audit Methods and Technology; (12) Energy Control Systems; (13) Energy Conservation; (14) Industrial Energy Conservation; (15) On-Site Generation; (16) Residential Impact of Siting; (17) Residential Energy Conservation; (18) Energy Conservation in Transportation; (19) State and Local Programs; (20) Where and How to Obtain Information; (21) Public Education and Participation; and (22) Energy Extension Programs. The publication spans the range of energy conservation issues and should be useful to a wide audience. Descriptors: Building Design, Conference Reports, Conservation (Environment), Economics

Stile, Stephen W.; And Others (1991). Results of a Panel Longitudinal Study with Systematic Replication: Graduates of Preschool Special Education Programs in Washington and New Mexico. This panel longitudinal study, originally conducted in Washington and systematically replicated in New Mexico, investigated the long-term educational placements of students served in preschool special education programs. Subjects were the 4338 children who graduated from preschool programs for children with disabilities during two 5-year periods. Findings indicate that early childhood programs for children with disabilities rarely reduce the need for future special education services and then only for students with mild disabilities. About 15 percent of students were able to remain in regular education for up to 5 years without special education services. The paper reviews past longitudinal studies, discusses methodological issues involved in longitudinal studies, and discusses implications of the study's findings for policymakers and practitioners. (Contains 12 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Disabilities, Educational Needs, Elementary Education, Longitudinal Studies

WILLIAMS, RICHARD P. (1967). THE FINAL REPORT OF THE INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN READING FOR TEAMS OF PRINCIPALS AND TEACHERS, GRADES 7-12, CONDUCTED AT NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY. THIS REPORT PRESENTS AN EVALUATION OF THE 8-WEEK NDEA INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN READING AT NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY, SUMMER OF 1967, BY THE 27 PARTICIPANTS AND THE DIRECTOR OF THE INSTITUTE. READING SPECIALISTS FROM ACROSS THE NATION SERVED AS CONSULTANTS. ADMINISTRATORS, SUPERVISORS, AND TEACHERS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL READING WHO HAD NOT TAKEN MORE THAN ONE GRADUATE COURSE IN THE TEACHING OF SECONDARY READING PARTICIPATED IN THE INSTITUTE AND WERE CONCERNED WITH THE INSTITUTE'S OBJECTIVES, ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION, AND INSTRUCTION AND STAFF. THE SUCCESS OF THE INSTITUTE IS ATTRIBUTED TO THE SUFFICIENT TIME PROVIDED FOR PREPLANNING, THE CAREFUL SELECTION OF CONSULTANTS AND PARTICIPANTS, THE USE OF A VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES AND LEARNING EXPERIENCES, THE AVAILABILITY OF MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT, AND THE FLEXIBILITY OF THE DAILY SCHEDULE. EXAMPLES OF THE EVALUATION FORMS USED AND APPENDIXES ARE INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Inservice Education, Institutes (Training Programs), Program Evaluation, Reading Instruction

Marshall, Margaret, Comp.; Herrera, Orlando, Comp. (1979). New Mexico Boating Education Resource Manual. Resources for individuals and organizations interested in teaching and promoting boating safety are listed in this directory of films, speakers, publications, and boating courses. Although some information is specific to New Mexico, most is of general interest. An annotated list of 40 films provides sources for obtaining the films, all free of charge on a loan basis. Topics include navigation, boating regulations, accident prevention, emergency procedures, and boating hazards. Emphasis is on outboard boating but white water running and sailing are also covered. An annotated list of 26 books and pamphlets includes information for ordering; most pamphlets are free in quantity. In addition to topics covered in the films, the publications contain information on canoeing, rowing, emergency repair afloat, first aid, and marine communications. The directory provides names, addresses, and phones of 18 people available to speak to school and community groups interested in boating. A final section describes 13 boating safety skills courses offered by the Coast Guard Auxiliary and the American Red Cross. The courses are appropriate for community education programs and range from in-depth study for serious boatmen to short courses designed to get the novice off to a good start. Descriptors: Accident Prevention, Annotated Bibliographies, Community Education, Courses

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1971). A Report – "The Response to An Even Chance": The Gallup-McKinley County School District as Seen by the New Mexico State Department of Education. The document is a response by the New Mexico State Department of Education to "allegations, accusations and implications" of misuse of Federal funds intended for American Indian children. The allegations resulted from an investigation–supported by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund with the cooperation of the Center for Laws and Education of Harvard University–which was conducted in a number of states with public schools serving the Indian population. This document contains the response for the Gallup-McKinley County School System exclusively. The rebuttal selects specific allegations from the original report, "An Even Chance" (ED 047 867), and presents answers and clarifications. Recommendations of the reviewing team, resulting from their follow-up study, are also included.   [More]  Descriptors: Administration, American Indians, Educational Finance, Federal Aid

Swift, Doug; And Others (1993). Funding Vocational Education. A Study To Enhance Employability Standards of Students in New Mexico. A study was conducted to determine the costs of vocational education programs in excess of, or in addition to, the costs of "regular" education for grades 7-12 in New Mexico. Data were gathered through a literature review, a study of vocational education funding formulas of other states; a review of the data from the New Mexico Vocational-Technical Information System for 1991-92 and from vocational programs in the state; visits to exemplary vocational education in and out of state; and interaction with an advisory committee formed for the project. The study identified the following characteristics of high quality programs: (1) enthusiastic teachers; (2) a goal of education for a career; (3) individualized instruction; (4) mastery of specified competencies and high expectations; (5) involvement of business and industry; (6) student organizations; (7) involvement in competency events; (8) articulation between secondary and postsecondary programs; (9) integration of academic and vocational curriculum; (10) up-to-date equipment and computers; and (11) the presence of a local vocational director. Insufficient data were developed to determine a dollar amount for the additional cost of vocational education or a ratio of cost of vocational education to the cost of regular education, although the data pointed to supplies and materials, student organizations, space, and equipment as increasing the costs of vocational education. Recommendations were made to change the funding formula for vocational education, to request annual appropriations for equipment, to encourage shared skill development programs and vocational supervisors between school districts, to develop a comprehensive plan for vocational education, and to develop an accounting system to track funding to various types of programs. (The report's five appendixes list the validation committee and advisory committee members, provide the survey instrument and responses, and include U.S. Office of Education Codes. The report has 9 tables and contains 34 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Facilities, Educational Finance, Educational Needs, Equipment

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1966). NEW MEXICO STATE CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION OF THE DISADVANTAGED, REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS (ALBUQUERQUE, NOVEMBER 11-12, 1966). DISCUSSED AT THE FIRST GENERAL SESSION OF THIS STATEWIDE CONFERENCE WERE (1) THE OBJECTIVES OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT TITLE I PROGRAMS, (2) THE PREPARATION OF TEACHERS OF THE DISADVANTAGED, AND (3) IMPRESSIONS OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION OF THE DISADVANTAGED, WHICH SOME OF THE CONFEREES HAD ATTENDED. THE CONTRIBUTION OF VARIOUS STATE AGENCIES TO IMPROVE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE DISADVANTAGED WAS ALSO CONSIDERED. AT THE SECOND GENERAL SESSION GUEST LECTURERS SPOKE ON TEACHING METHODS, MATERIALS, AND CURRICULUM FOR THE DISADVANTAGED. GROUP DISCUSSIONS WERE CONCERNED WITH SPANISH-SPEAKING STUDENTS, READING INSTRUCTION, VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS, CULTURAL ACTIVITIES, SCHOOL SERVICES, AND STUDY CENTERS. ADDITIONAL TOPICS UNDER CONSIDERATION INCLUDED KINDERGARTEN AND PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS, INSERVICE TRAINING, APPROACHES TO PUPIL EVALUATION, AND RESEARCH AND INFORMATION DISSEMINATION PRACTICES. NEW MEXICO'S DISADVANTAGED POPULATION CONSISTS OF INDIAN, SPANISH, AND ANGLO ETHNIC GROUPS.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Ancillary School Services, Compensatory Education, Conference Reports

Harloe, Bart, Ed. (1988). Towards the Year 2001: Cooperative Collection Development and Resource Sharing in the Southwest. Proceedings of a Workshop (Las Cruces, New Mexico, November 7, 1988). These proceedings of a workshop on cooperative collection development and resource sharing in the Southwest contains the text of the following presentations: (1) "Collaborative Collection Development in an Era of Financial Limitations" (Paul Mosher); (2) "Cooperative Collection Development: The New Mexico Point of View" (Jeanne Sohn); (3) "Collection Development Policies and the Arizona Experience" (Dora Biblarz); (4) "Technical Aspects of Cooperative Collection Development" (Sara Heitshu); and (5) "Trans-Border Cooperation and the Texas Experience" (Mary Keckley). A transcription of workshop discussion by the presenters and audience members is included as well as biographical information on the presenters. A directory of workshop participants is appended. Descriptors: Academic Libraries, Futures (of Society), Higher Education, Library Collection Development

Cunico, Gerald (1983). Communications. New Mexico Industrial Education Curriculum Guide. This curriculum guide is designed to assist teachers in junior high and high schools in New Mexico to improve the quality of instruction and to prepare a new curriculum in communications that is consistent with current thinking in industrial arts education. This communications curriculum is designed for one year or 180 hours of instruction, with each of the four sections (telecommunications, visual communications in drafting, graphic communications in printing, and photography) to be implemented on a nine-week basis. Each of the four sections is divided into a course outline and units of instruction. The units of instruction are arranged in the following format: unit description, objectives, content outline, teacher activities, student activities, references/resources, information sheets, transparency masters, teacher demonstration sheets, student assignment sheets, student activity sheets, unit examinations, answers to examinations, and lists of equipment/supplies needed. The objectives found at the beginning of each unit are measured by the student activities or by examinations. Answers are provided for all of the assignments and examinations. A rationale and possible outcomes for the course are also provided in the guide. Descriptors: Classroom Techniques, Communications, Course Content, Course Descriptions

MacCarter, Don L.; Oldham, Pat (1986). Wildlife of New Mexico: A Coloring Book. This coloring book showing 31 of New Mexico's wild animals was prepared in conjunction with Project WILD, an environmental and conservation education program for elementary and secondary school students. Each page contains a large line drawing of a wild animal, a brief description of its habitat and behavior, and a range map that indicates the animal's current range within the state. The description of the vagrant shrew is typical of the verbal information provided: "One of the tiniest of all mammals, vagrant shrews live in marshes and meadows. They are fierce little creatures that feed almost nonstop on insects, worms and other small animals." Other animals included in the book are the ringtail, western bluebird, pinon jay, porcupine, abert's squirrel, sandhill crane, desert bighorn sheep, javelina, black bear, black-tailed prairie dog, roadrunner, horned lizard, pronghorn antelope, coyote, little brown bat, black-tailed rattlesnake, elk, raven, mountain lion, burrowing owl, black-tailed jack rabbit, red-tailed hawk, western meadowlark, collared lizard, pintail duck, spotted skunk, wild turkey, lesser prairie chicken, and swift and kit foxes.   [More]  Descriptors: Animal Behavior, Animals, Childrens Literature, Conservation Education

Goodman, Darril (1965). Programmed Mathematics, Quemado [New Mexico] High School. In an effort to resolve the small school problems of limited math offerings, small classes, scheduling, and teacher overload, a secondary teacher from Quemado, New Mexico (a rural area) initiated use of five different programmed mathematics courses in one class period. Objectives were to: increase math offerings; decrease scheduling problems; increase motivation; provide for individual differences; meet requirements re: modern math and examining bodies; limit heavy grading duties; promote student development in formula solving, graph reading and construction, math nomenclature, etc.; and increase teacher time for individualized and/or group instruction. Employing a teacher's aide, a grading system built upon point accumulation, and student carrels, programmed courses in basic math, beginning and advanced algebra, plane geometry, and trigonometry were offered twice daily in two 45 minute periods. Results indicated: high student interest at the beginning of the year with a gradual slow down, particularly among the slower students; difficulty in getting all students to work at a rate commensurate with their ability; most teacher attention directed at slow students; increased teaching demands; and increased course completion by graduating seniors (the appendices presents a 1959-65 breakdown of course completion, the grading system, and a student's evaluation of programmed instruction).   [More]  Descriptors: Administration, Carrels, Class Organization, Educational Objectives

Banker, Mark T. (1993). Missionaries and Mountain Peoples: Presbyterian Responses to Southern Appalachia & Hispanic New Mexico. This paper examines the comparable educational histories of the "Hispanos" of a mountainous area of New Mexico and the peoples of southern Appalachia. Presbyterian missionaries entered both regions following the Civil War and soon placed mountain people in the category of "exceptional populations," along with freed slaves, Native Americans, Mormons, and other marginal groups in American society. By 1890, there were 32 mission schools in New Mexico serving more than 1,600 Mexican-American students. A decade later in the Appalachians, there were 37 mission schools that served 3,000 mountain youths. By the early 20th century, mountain students could progress from isolated one-room elementary schools to relatively large and well-equipped boarding schools that offered secondary-level work. The goal of boarding schools was to prepare future teachers for the advent of public school systems. As the latter expectation became fulfilled, Presbyterians gradually discontinued their day schools. The boarding schools, however, remained vital through the 1930s. Throughout the years many teachers left, but for those who remained, classroom duties made up only a small part of their daily routine. They performed an array of medical duties; offered advice about housekeeping, farming, and legal affairs; and served as midwives and undertakers. These efforts bridged cultural barriers, countered local suspicions, and perhaps most importantly, eroded the missionaries' own prejudices and ethnocentrism. Although the missionaries accomplished a great deal by offering education, there is evidence that their influence eroded traditional culture in both regions.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Boarding Schools, Cultural Interrelationships, Educational History

Lampman, Henry P. (1973). Southeastern New Mexico Bilingual Program. Final Report. Academic growth and personal-social growth of 20 second grade children in the Southeastern New Mexico Bilingual Program at Artesia are compared to 20 second grade children in the standard program. The groups were matched by chronological and mental age, IQ, family income, family situation (both parents, only father, or only mother), number of children in family, parents' education and occupation, and home language. The academic growth was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test in both English and Spanish, the Stanford Achievement Test, and an English and a Spanish test in sentence completion format measuring responsiveness. The effects of the bilingual program on the self-image and social interaction of the child were evaluated by self-rating scales administered orally and recorded by the teacher aide on a pretest and posttest basis. Findings showed that the children in the bilingual program made greater progress; both groups of children had a high self-esteem at the beginning of the year but as they grew older their self-concept lowered; there was no significant difference in their social interaction; and the bilingual group responded more rapidly in both English and Spanish.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Anglo Americans, Bilingual Education, Comparative Analysis

Cowell, M. Elizabeth (1995). Government Information on the Internet: Implications for Libraries and Communities in Eastern New Mexico. Print sources of government information often are discontinued and replaced with either a CD ROM or Internet version, leaving the information seeker access to the documents only if they have technological ability. A more cohesive government information policy could remedy these and related problems. Libraries and the public may not be ready financially to make the shift to electronic information. Thirty-three academic, public, and special libraries in eastern New Mexico were surveyed to illustrate the technological isolation of eastern New Mexico. Of the 23 libraries that completed surveys: (1) two are selective federal depository libraries–both have text based Internet access and CD ROM capabilities, one provides Internet access to faculty and staff only; (2) four have Internet access and CD ROM capabilities; (3) two have CD ROM capabilities and plan to be on the Internet by year end; and (4) 15 have no Internet access, and seven libraries of this group have no CD ROM capabilities. When patrons request materials the libraries do not have, libraries either send the patron to a local selective depository, order the materials through interlibrary loan from the regional depository library, or purchase them if they are deemed to be high use potential. Based on the results of the survey, a majority of the participating libraries would not be able to adequately fill document requests if only electronic government information was available. The Depository Library Program is the taxpayer's interface with the information the government produces. If this access point disappears, eastern New Mexicans would be left to their own devices to obtain important government information.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Information, Computers, Costs, Depository Libraries

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