Bibliography: New Mexico (page 119 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Henry W. Pascual, Alexandria National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Lotsee Smith, Joseph Donald Baca, Inc. Science Service, Donald L. Foster, Alice Ann Cleveland, Gerald M. Goldhaber, RALPH WOODIN, and Joanne M. Herbert.

Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC. (1983). Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (34th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 9-14, 1983). A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small fairs such as a local fair, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent that fair in the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). The finalists whose project abstracts are reported in this book won the honor of presenting their projects at the 34th ISEF in Albuquerque, New Mexico in May, 1983 as the result of being chosen the best in 560 affiliated fairs. Abstracts are organized by project categories. These 12 groups are described and include: behavioral and social sciences; biochemistry; botany; medicine and health; microbiology; zoology; environmental sciences; chemistry; earth and space sciences; engineering; mathematics and computers; and physics. An index is also included of all the finalists. Descriptors: Abstracts, Academic Achievement, Awards, Engineering Education

National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Alexandria, VA. (1998). Performance Goals and Indicators. Quick Turn Around (QTA). This report is a brief analysis of survey results from 43 states and 2 non-state jurisdictions regarding the status of their implementation of a new provision in the 1997 Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that requires each state to establish performance goals and indicators for children with disabilities. The survey also asked states whether progress on performance goals will be reported as part of a regular accountability report or developed as a separate report. Survey results indicate that only 12 states have their performance goals completed: Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin. All of these states except Pennsylvania have also completed work on their performance indicators. Thirty-two responded that they had made the decision about reporting results for students with disabilities. The majority (n=24) will include these data as part of their regular accountability reports, while only five plan to issue separate reports for special education. Three states will use both reporting strategies. A chart indicating the results of the survey on performance goals and indicators is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academic Standards, Accountability, Disabilities

Cleveland, Alice Ann; Lewis, Nancy G. (1980). Twenty Activities to Expand Your Students' Knowledge of the World While Studying Your State. A Global Perspectives Experimental Unit. This unit contains 20 classroom activities which have a global approach and will enable junior or high school students to learn about their state and the world. Student materials and teaching procedures are provided for each activity. Some examples of the activities follow. In one activity students compare the size of New Mexico with another area of the world they are studying. In another activity students are given a list of geographical features (e.g. canyon/valley), a map of their state, and a world atlas and asked to locate as many of the geographical features as possible first in their state and then in the world. The activity "Foods: Which Are American?" involves students in checking the "American Heritage" dictionary to find the area from which various foods came and to study the etymology of the words. In an activity on "Restaurants and Their Specialties" students find the restaurant section of the yellow pages and list the restaurants under the following headings: foods of local or regional areas, foods of foreign areas, and general foods served. In two of the activities, students use maps–a U.S. map and a state map–to find the answers to specific questions such as "Which states share a border with eight other states?" or "How many county seats in New Mexico have a population of over 5000?" In another activity students use statistics from the almanac to compare their state with another country of similar geography. They compare literacy rate, population density, percentage of various ethnic groups, chief crops, and life expectancy at birth. Other activities involve students in drawing conclusions from a silent viewing of a filmstrip and re-evaluating following the addition of the narrated information, exploring various aspects of an area of a people through a discussion of pictures, and locating areas where events are happening and categorizing them. Although written for use with students in New Mexico, the materials can very easily be used in other states. Descriptors: Class Activities, Food, Geography, Global Approach

Krueger, Jo Ann (1981). Del Norte's Study of High School Factors as Related to Placement of Freshmen in the University of New Mexico's Basic Skills Program. According to a report from the University of New Mexico (UNM) 52 percent of Del Norte High School's (Albuquerque) graduates who entered UNM in the fall of 1979 were placed in at least one Basic Skills class, designed to assist beginning students whose American College Test (ACT) scores showed deficient college preparation in raising their academic achievement to college entrance standards. In response, Del Norte undertook a study of its graduates who were (1) in the UNM Basic Skills program, or (2) exempted from the Basic Skills program. Their high school records were reviewed along three dimensions–factual descriptors, overall achievement, and high school curricular factors–and analyzed statistically. Major findings and their implications are discussed. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academic Records, Basic Skills, College Freshmen

Fuller, Mary Lou; Casaus, Luis (1980). The Divorced Chicana of Northern New Mexico. County demographic records and the voluntary responses of 80 Chicanas to a questionnaire and a self-concept examination were analyzed to identify the patterns, problems, and dynamics in the lives of divorced Northern New Mexico Chicanas. The women, half of whom were divorced and most of whom were Roman Catholics, were from urban Bernalillo County and non-urban San Miguel County. Chicano divorce rates were lower than expected in both places. Eighty percent of the non-urban divorced women, 79% of the urban divorced women, and 60% of the married women received salaries. Among divorced women, 50% earned less than $5000/year and 52.2% received no child support. Most additional financial support came from the families of non-urban divorced women and from the friends of their urban counterparts. Emotional support from the Church was important to all divorced women. Non-urban non-custodial parents (fathers) visited their children more often than urban fathers, but visitation rates for both groups exceeded national averages. The self concepts of the four groups of women were remarkably similar. Chicano culture, the influence of the Church, and a non-urban setting may inhibit the divorce rate. Descriptors: Demography, Divorce, Employment Level, Employment Statistics

WOODIN, RALPH (1966). SUPERVISING OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION, A REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ON SUPERVISING OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION (NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY, CARLSBAD BRANCH, AUGUST 8-24, 1966). THE IDEAS AND SUGGESTIONS OF 17 NEW MEXICO VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TEACHERS FOR DEVELOPING OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE PROGRAMS IN BUSINESS EDUCATION ARE PRESENTED. WORKING AS SIX COMMITTEES, THE GROUP PRODUCED REPORTS ON (1) IMPORTANCE OF OCCUPATIONAL WORK-EXPERIENCE, (2) COOPERATIVE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, (3) TYPES OF OCCUPATIONAL WORK-EXPERIENCE FOR COOPERATIVE OFFICE EDUCATION PROGRAMS, (4) MAKING COMMUNITY SURVEYS, (5) PUBLIC RELATIONS, (6) INITIAL STUDENT SELECTION, (7) ORGANIZING AND USING ADVISORY COUNCILS, (8) SECURING ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE AND DEVELOPING LOCAL POLICIES, (9) ROLE OF THE TEACHER-COORDINATOR IN GUIDANCE FOR CAREER SELECTION, (10) THE SELECTION AND ESTABLISHMENT OF TRAINING STATIONS, (11) SUPERVISION OF THE STUDENT ON THE JOB, (12) DEVELOPMENT OF COURSES OF STUDY, (13) RELATED IN-SCHOOL INSTRUCTION FOR COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, (14) THE EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT, (15) CONTINUING EDUCATION, AND (16) EVALUATING THE TOTAL PROGRAM.   [More]  Descriptors: Admission Criteria, Adult Vocational Education, Advisory Committees, Career Guidance

Pascual, Henry W. (1973). Bilingual Education for New Mexico Schools. Bilingual education (BE) has long been established in Mexico, Peru, the U.S.S.R., the Philippines, and a number of other nations in order to teach both the vernacular and official languages. In the United States, BE has received increased attention since the passage of the National Bilingual Education Act and Title VII legislation. Evaluation reports from New Mexico's bilingual programs in Las Cruces, Albuquerque, and Artesia demonstrate that there are still questions to be answered and disagreements to be reconciled as to the basic definition and scope of BE. Areas of disagreement among educators are: (1) use of the vernacular versus a standardized version of the child's mother tongue, (2) amount of time devoted to non-English language instruction, (3) qualifications of bilingual teachers, (4) types of instructional materials, (5) basic purposes, and (6) extent of the program after grade 3. Two types of BE programs serve as models. The acculturation model is for children with limited English competence for whom initial instruction in the vernacular is phased out gradually in the primary grades as the students acquire a better command of English. The maintenance and expansion model, for grades 1-12, is designed to graduate literate bilingual students who are functional in two languages and cultures. A curriculum plan for the second model and comments on community involvement, costs, and teacher competencies are provided. Descriptors: Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Bilingual Schools, Bilingualism

Herbert, Joanne M., Ed.; McNergney, Robert F., Ed. (1996). The Case of Columbus, New Mexico: Educational Life on the Border. Multicultural Videocase Series. This guide accompanies one of a pair of videocases depicting educational life in Columbus, New Mexico. The videocase includes 23 minutes of unstaged but edited videotape footage of teaching and learning in and around an elementary school. The first section of the guide, "Teaching Note" (Linda Warner), contains a transcript of the videotape and questions designed to help instructors engage people in case-based discussions. In the teaching note section, the videotape is divided into five segments: (1) the principal of Columbus School, Dennis Armijo, provides background on the district's practice of educating students from Mexico; (2) Lynda Leyba, a second-grade teacher, introduces a set of vocabulary words written in Spanish and English to her students; (3) Mario Vasquez, the bilingual resource teacher, conducts a lesson on chilies and describes his educational goals for students; (4) Leyba and members of the resource team talk about similarities and differences among cultural groups represented in Columbus School; and (5) the resource team discusses some of the challenges students from Columbus experience when they go to junior high school in Deming, New Mexico. Finally, one resource staff member describes changes in curriculum since she was a student at Columbus; another talks about efforts to involve parents in school activities. The second section, which comprises about three quarters of the guide, presents three critical perspectives on the video written by Ursula Casanova, Deidre Dancer McMann, and Martin Haberman. Each of these essays relates its author's life and professional experiences, the educational events in the video, and the broader concept of multicultural education.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Case Studies, Elementary Education, Higher Education

Goldhaber, Gerald M. (1972). Communication and Student Unrest: A Report to the President of the University of New Mexico; Part II: University-Public Channels. This second part of a three-part study (Communication and Student Unrest) expands upon concerns generated by the original study, primarily the need for detailed examination of the channels of communication emanating from within and without the University. This report focuses on evaluation and analysis of university-public channels, specifically the University of New Mexico's attempts to bridge the "communication gap" between itself and the surrounding community. (A prior finding had been that campus unrest tended to precipitate negative attitudes toward the university.) The first two sections describe and evaluate the existing communication channels between the university and its public. The final section provides a discussion of specific recommendations for improving university-public communication, based on the study's findings. General suggestions include better use of the mass media to enhance the university's image and enlarged use of open conferences between university personnel and the general public to increase personally-oriented communication. (See related document CS 500 235.)   [More]  Descriptors: Activism, Attitude Change, Communication (Thought Transfer), Community Attitudes

Vaughan, David (1979). Minorities, the Poor and School Finance Reform. Vol. 5: The Impact of New Mexico's 1974 School Finance Reform on Poor and Minority Children. New Mexico is discussed in this fifth volume of a nine-volume, six-state study of the impact of school finance reform on minorities and the poor. The report gives a demographic summary of the state and presents the history of its school financing efforts from 1847 to the present, with special emphasis on the 1974 finance reform law. To assess the law's impact, researchers used correlation coefficients, percentiles, averages, and maps to analyze data on educational revenues, school district wealth, tax effort, ethnicity, personal and family income, urban location, and federal aid, particularly aid from Public Law 874. Among the findings of this analysis are that minority students but not poor students tend to be concentrated in particular school districts and that the 1974 reform increased the mean tax rate, has little effect on fiscal neutrality or on total revenues received by poorer districts, and reduced state aid to American Indian pupils. Descriptors: Disadvantaged Youth, Economically Disadvantaged, Elementary Secondary Education, Equalization Aid

Smith, Lotsee (1977). American Indian Community Library Demonstration Project. First–Fourth Quarterly Reports, 1976-77. Quarterly progress reports present the major accomplishments and activities of four American Indian Community Library Demonstration projects funded during 1976-1977. These projects established library services in New Mexico for four previously unserved Pueblo communities: Cochiti, Santo Domingo, Sky City, and Laguna. For each quarter, an overall progress report for the total project is presented, followed by individual reports for each of the four project sites. Site reports discuss activities and accomplishments under the following headings: facilities, personnel, materials, services, progress, funding, summary, and objectives for the reporting period. Appended to some of the quarterly reports are agendas and minutes of the library board meetings held during the reporting period and notices of special activities. As of the final quarter of the project, library programs and services had been established at each of the four sites. A formal evaluation of the projects will be contained in the final project report. Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Demonstration Programs, Federal Programs

Foster, Donald L. (1981). Fundamentals of Library Science. Library Science 424. An introductory letter, a list of general instructions on how to proceed with a correspondence course, a syllabus, and an examination request form are presented for a correspondence course in the fundamentals of library science offered by the University of New Mexico's Division of Continuing Education and Community Services. The course is a survey of the history of libraries, the social forces affecting the objectives and functions of modern libraries, types of library services, the library profession, its philosophy, publications, and organizations, and the major trends and problems in the field. The text used is Jean Gates'"Introduction to Librarianship." The syllabus contains 36 lessons with questions and essays designed either to examine the student's grasp of specific materials covered in the readings, or to give the student an opportunity to express his or her thoughts on a subject dealing with library science. Descriptors: Assignments, Continuing Education, Correspondence Study, Course Descriptions

SOUTHARD, J.K.; AND OTHERS (1967). PROJECT MOVE AHEAD, DEVELOPMENT OF A PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS FROM MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL FAMILIES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE MESILLA VALLEY, NEW MEXICO. IN THE SUMMER OF 1967, WORK WAS INITIATED BY 3 PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS IN SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO TO PROVIDE AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL FAMILIES. THE INITIAL EFFORT INVOLVED A SURVEY TO IDENTIFY MIGRANT YOUTH AND THEIR NEEDS. COMMUNITY AGENCIES AND THE 3 SCHOOL SYSTEMS THEN DETERMINED PRIORITIES AND CONSTRUCTED MATERIALS FOR THE PRESENTATION OF A DAILY RADIO PROGRAM WHICH WAS BROADCAST TO ALL SCHOOLS. IN-SERVICE EDUCATION OF TEACHERS AND A TEACHER AIDE WORKSHOP WAS ALSO CONDUCTED. THE BASIC PURPOSE OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM WAS TO IMPROVE THE SELF CONCEPT OF THE MIGRANT STUDENT AND HIS FAMILY BY MEANS OF BROADCASTS, FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES, NEWSLETTERS, AND HOME AND COMMUNITY CONTACTS. A SAMPLE LESSON PLAN AND NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ARE INCLUDED TO DESCRIBE THE PROGRAM.    [More]  Descriptors: Activities, Agricultural Laborers, Community Organizations, Educational Programs

Klein, Stephen P. (1972). An Evaluation of New Mexico's Educational Priorities. A study was conducted to determine the educational objectives that the school districts in New Mexico consider most important. Secondary purposes were to determine whether the two methods yielded similar or different priorities and whether there were any systematic differences in the views of certain districts and/or kinds of raters. Twenty-seven school districts formulated important objectives in social studies, communication skills, math, and science. Each of the 153 objectives was printed on a card, and the cards were divided into 4 decks for each of the subject areas. Within each of 31 additional district, four teams of raters were formed, each consisting of a student, a teacher, an administrator, and a community representative. Each team member, sorted each deck of cards into three piles–below average importance, average importance, and above average importance–with a minimum of five in each pile. Each team also researched a consensus as to the 5-15 objectives it considered most important. The procedure was then repeated with the 27 districts involved in developing the objectives. The results indicated that certain objectives tended to be considered much more important than others and that this trend was consistent across different kinds of raters and districts and the two methods (i.e., individual raters vs. group consensus).   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Community Attitudes, Educational Attitudes, Educational Objectives

Baca, Joseph Donald (1972). A Comparative Study of Differences in Perception of Mexican American Students Between Anglo and Mexican American Secondary School Teachers in Dona Ana County (New Mexico). The purpose of this study was to determine whether attitudes toward Mexican American students were associated with the ethnicity, age, and teaching experience of secondary school teachers in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. A 50 item cultural awareness questionnaire was used with a sample of 112 participants. The 6 significant factors studied were achievement, time orientation, acculturation, religiosity, family identification, and economic influences. The results of the study indicate a possible need to sensitize teachers of "culturally different" children. The study was concluded by a discussion of implications for the state legislature, the State Department of Education, local school boards, teachers, administrators, and teacher-training institutions. Also included were recommendations for the various educational agencies.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Influences, Economic Status

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