Bibliography: New Mexico (page 124 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Margot Astrov, Arlington Council for Exceptional Children, Sarah W. Barlow, Janice Neleigh, Willard P. Bass, Martha Ward, Jack O.L. Saunders, Sirarpi Ohannessian, Jerome Levy, and Marian J. Tonjes.

Kerikas, Emanuel John (1962). Current Status of Speech Education in the Public Secondary Schools of the Intermountain States. This 1962 survey of speech education in 123 representative secondary schools in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming provides information about (1) the number and percentage of students enrolled in speech classes; (2) qualifications of the speech faculty, and the organization and administration of the speech program; (3) the relationship between the student and the speech program regarding requirements, performance standards, and participation; (4) the curriculum of classroom speech programs including types of materials and methods of evaluation; (5) the types of extra-class speech programs and activities, such as plays and clubs; and (6) the results of self-evaluations of the speech programs by the schools. Descriptors: After School Programs, Course Organization, Enrollment, Instructional Materials

HOMAN, LARRY E.; KELLY, PATRICK J. (1967). THE FIRST SIX MONTHS–A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION REPORT. EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER (ESC) IS AN ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCE PROVIDING A VARIETY OF SERVICES FOR PUBLIC AND PRIVATE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS IN NEW MEXICO. SERVICES ARE OFFERED IN THE FOLLOWING BROADLY DEFINED AREAS–(1) CURRICULUM, (2) PSYCHOLOGICAL AND GUIDANCE SERVICES, (3) ADULT EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, AND (4) COMPUTER SERVICES. THE PURPOSE OF THE CENTER IN ITS BROADEST SENSE IS TO CAUSE CREATIVE CHANGE IN WHAT EDUCATORS AND STUDENTS KNOW AND DO. THERE IS A DIRECT EFFORT AT PRODUCING CREATIVE IMPROVEMENT IN SCHOOLS. THE CENTER'S STAFF OPERATES ON TWO LEVELS. FIRST, IT SERVICES REQUESTS FOR SUPPLEMENTAL SERVICES. SECOND, THE CENTER PROVIDES PROGRAM SERVICES WHEREIN STAFF EFFORT IS DIRECTED PRIMARILY AT CLASSROOMS, SCHOOLS, AND DISTRICTS FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THOSE EDUCATIONAL UNITS.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Bilingualism, Community Development, Computer Programs

Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. (1969). Toward a Joint Attack on Functional Illiteracy. Attending this 1969 conference on adult basic education were representatives from not only the Ozarks and Appalachian regions but also areas ranging from southern New York State to Mississippi and Louisiana, west to Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California, and as far north as Illinois. Governor Winthrop Rockefeller spoke on "The Challenges of Adult Basic Education." Also included in the agenda were "The Need for Adult Basic Education" by David A. Sands; the remarks by William F. Gaul, which noted that the people of this nation are beginning to accept our joint responsibility for the plight of Americans who need education to alleviate illiteracy and obtain jobs; "Comprehension Development in Adult Basic Education" by Nicholas J. Silvaroli; and "The Appalachian Experience" by Ann Hayes, who discussed the functions of the Appalachian Adult Basic Education Demonstration Center.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Education, Adult Literacy, Adult Programs

Oliver, Leonard P. (1969). "Trainers of Trainers' Workshops" in Adult Basic Education and Subsequent Grant Activity. Workshops were conducted in 1965 at the Universities of New Mexico, Maryland, and Washington for 150 educators responsible for preparing trainers of adult basic education teachers. Immediate program evaluation and followup evaluation were done; the University of Maryland followup surveyed not only workshop participants, but also trainers and teachers taught by them. The workshops led to the publication (1966) of a guide for teacher trainers and to the creation (1967) of a national clearinghouse on public school adult education. Areas of need were highlighted in information and coordination, teacher training, curriculum development, funding, publicity, student evaluation, and counseling. Recommendations called for a national service bureau in adult basic education, regional demonstration centers, a national teacher training institute, demonstration projects in industry, and a demonstration project to train dropouts and unemployed youth as teacher aides.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrators, Adult Basic Education, Adult Educators, Budgets

Northern Montana Coll., Havre. (1970). Summary – National Dissemination and the Five Target States, Part 3, Final Report for Phase II–Dissemination, Rural Shared Services. The dissemination phase (Phase II) of the Rural Shared Services Project is reported in this document. Efforts of the dissemination phase were concentrated in 5 target states: Vermont, Georgia, Wyoming, Montana, and New Mexico; national dissemination was limited to attendance at national conferences, the U. S. Office of Education PREP materials for state departments of education, and articles in national and regional magazines. Four stages of work included (1) contacting Federal leaders to communicate Phase I findings; (2) visiting leaders in rural education, particularly in target states, to determine commitment to the project; (3) planning and conducting presentations on data obtained from Phase I; and (4) assessing strategies and writing up case-study summaries. In the document, anticipated outcomes of Phase II are listed, and case studies are given for each target state. Related documents are ED 028 882 through ED 028 885.   [More]  Descriptors: Case Studies, Curriculum, Demonstration Programs, Educational Innovation

Ward, Martha, Comp.; Barlow, Sarah W., Comp. (1973). Your Right to Indian Welfare. A Handbook on the BIA General Assistance Program. The handbook helps American Indians and Alaskan Natives learn about their rights under the Bureau of Indian Affairs General Assistance (GA) welfare program. This program is run by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and is only for Alaskan Natives and Indians in 15 states: Alaska, Arizona, Colorado (Southern Ute Reservation only), Idaho, Minnesota (Red Lake Reservation only), Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wyoming. The handbook tells the reader where to look in the GA part of the BIA Manual, Section 3.1, to find the rights mentioned in the handbook. It also tells the number of the Bureau's rule on a subject for further reference. This handbook covers 5 main areas with subtopics: (1) welfare programs and definitions; (2) who can get GA and how to get it; (3) GA payments; (4) BIA decisions, records, and appeals; and (5) other programs, such as food programs and legal advice.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Civil Rights, Economically Disadvantaged

Cordova, Ignacio R. (1969). The Relationship of Acculturation, Achievement, and Alienation Among Spanish American Sixth Grade Students. In an effort to discover relationships between acculturation, achievement, and teacher expectations as sources of alienation of Spanish American students, a sample of 477 6th grade students in 16 schools in Northern New Mexico was studied. The teacher sample found that: (1) no significant relationship existed between composite achievement and alienation; (2) negatively correlated relationships existed between composite achievement, politics, education, and health; (3) a positive correlation appeared between teacher expectation and composite alienation; and (4) no significant relationship existed between teacher expectation and composite acculturation. It was concluded that alienation of the Spanish American student may be largely attributed to inflexible curricula and activities which fail to involve the Spanish American student cognitively as well as affectively.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Acculturation, Curriculum Enrichment, Curriculum Evaluation

Neleigh, Janice, Ed.; Levy, Jerome, Ed. (1969). Utilization of Non-Professionals As Demonstrated by Dona Ana Mental Health Services; A Conference Report. As described at a 1969 conference and summarized here, the training and use of nonprofessionals in the demonstration program (1962-68) of the Dona Ana Mental Health Services, New Mexico, represented a significant change in structure, manpower utilization, and delivery system for such services. The conference itself reviewed such aspects as staffing and organization, client characteristics, client satisfaction, training concepts (aimed at the "here and now" problems of emotional disturbance rather than at patient histories), and project impact on the community and state. Community projects consisted of an answering service (the Crisis Center), a youth council, an alcoholism program, and creation of a center for retarded and emotionally disturbed children. There was discussion as to what program elements had been useful and were more widely applicable. (Appendixes contain two references, agenda and roster, background information, role descriptions, conference evaluations, abstracts of research findings, and retrospective judgments on various phases of subprofessional training and utilization.)   [More]  Descriptors: Administrative Organization, Adults, Children, Client Characteristics (Human Services)

1969 (1969). Association for the Education of Teachers in Science; Southwest Regional Conference, Emporia, Kansas, February 14-15, 1969. The focus of this conference was analyzing the impact of curricular innovations upon science teacher education. Included are a number of papers presented at the conference. The science and mathematics inservice programs in Kansas, particularly the Introductory Physical Science Program, are discussed. The Science In-Service Project at the University of Texas is explained, as well as the curriculum development within the Dallas Junior High Schools. Included is a report of the introduction of the Earth Science Curriculum Project into Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah with the aid of the Cooperative College-School Science Science Program. The use of inservice teacher education programs for introducing the major elementary school science projects in Colorado is discussed.  Another paper describes problems of preservice teacher education resulting from new science programs. Descriptors: Biology, College School Cooperation, College Science, Conference Reports

Saunders, Jack O.L. (1969). The Blueprint Potentials of the Cooperative Teacher Education Preparation; Utilizing the Talented Mexican American. The Teacher Education Cooperative Program, begun in 1965-66 at New Mexico State University, provides capable students with invaluable experiences in the work and study phases, as well as an opportunity to finance their education. The work and study phases alternate, each approximately 6 months long. The curriculum for the study phase consists of the general education requirements of the University. The curricular experiences that accompany the work phase constitute two-thirds of the professional preparation of the cooperative students. A sizeable proportion of the students enrolled in the program are Mexican Americans who might not have been able to attend college without some financial assistance. They thus have the opportunity to contribute to bilingual cultural understandings of the Mexican American. Various career advantages are available to all the students in the program.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, College Students, Cooperative Education, Cultural Awareness

Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others (1969). Conference on Navajo Orthography. This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose of such an orthography is its adoption for uniform use in Bureau of Indian Affairs sponsored publications for use in its school system, but the Conference hopes it would have wider acceptance. The present report covers considerations in formulating the recommendations, presents the recommended script, and discusses the purposes to be served by a Navajo writing system. Appended are a listing of various Navajo alphabets compiled by Oswald Werner, and notes by Sarah C. Gudschinsky on orthography preparation and revision.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Conference Reports, Early Childhood Education, Navajo

Snyder, Patricia, Ed. (1969). Summary of State Legislation Affecting Higher Education in the West: 1969. This report is designed to provide an interpretive summary of 1969 state legislative actions in the West that affected higher education. After a regional summary, both brief and extended analyses are provided of legislation in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Legislative actions took place in the areas of general appropriations, campus conduct, faculty salaries and benefits, higher education studies, private school support, scholarships and loans, statewide coordination, governance and student voice, tuition and fees, facilities, special programs, loyalty oaths, and residency requirements. Legislation that was proposed but not passed is also discussed. The state summaries were written by correspondents and writers from various newspapers in the Western states.   [More]  Descriptors: Coordination, Educational Cooperation, Educational Legislation, Facilities

Astrov, Margot, Ed. (1962). American Indian Prose and Poetry. An Anthology. In this anthology of translations of American Indian prose and poetry, it is pointed out that differences in styles and mental attitudes of various tribes are reflected through self-expression. In keeping with this, the compilation is organized according to geographical regions in North and South America, including Mexico and Central America. Regions and the number of entries from each are as follows: 55 from the Northern Woodlands, the Basin Area, and the Great Plains; 3 from the Southeast; 20 from southwestern deserts; 14 from the pueblos in New Mexico and Arizona; 10 from California; 13 from the Northwest; 7 from the Far North; 9 from Mexico; 4 from Central America; and 7 from Peru. Included in the document are 14 pages of bibliography, 5 pages of index, and 315 titles of other books available by the same publisher, with a price listing for each book. Descriptors: American Indians, Anthologies, Books, Folk Culture

Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA. (1970). State Legislation for Children with Learning Disabilities. CEC State-Federal Information Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children Series on Government and the Exceptional Child, Volume I. The first in a series of reports on the exceptional child and government, the publication is compiled from the laws of the 50 states and is specifically directed to the child with learning disabilities. Not included are the laws of states in which the learning disabled receive services when no specific legal provisions are made (an umbrella law covers all exceptional children) or when services have been extended by broadening legal labels such as "crippled,""maladjusted," or "health impaired." The document is updated through 1969; more current information will become available from the State-Federal Information Clearinghouse. Laws are cited from the following states: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, and West Virginia.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrative Policy, Administrator Responsibility, Admission Criteria, Definitions

Bass, Willard P.; Tonjes, Marian J. (1970). "Dropout or Graduate? A Synthesis of Three Studies on the Degree of Success of American Indian High School Students in the Southwest.". Three studies, requested by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, were conducted by the Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to provide information about the Indian high school student and graduate in the Southwest. These studies–a dropout study, a high school graduate follow-up study, and a 4-year longitudinal study of academic achievement–are synthesized in the document and examine family characteristics, high school student characteristics, post high school experiences of graduates, and opinions of high school graduates. Seven recommendations are offered which are aimed at 2 problem areas: (1) correcting deficiencies in basic communication skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing (universal problems hindering the Indian student) and (2) improving educational opportunities for Indian students.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indians, Dropout Rate, Dropouts

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