Bibliography: New Mexico (page 132 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Ernesto Galarza, Richard R. DeBlassie, Frank Sotomayor, R. P. Ludanyi, Richard T. Hess, Farmington Four Corners Regional Commission, Leo Grebler, Washington General Electric Co, Roselin Ehrlich, and Leonard Joseph Mestas.

Four Corners Regional Commission, Farmington, NM. (1971). 'A Federal-State Partnership for Economic Growth.' Fourth Annual Report. The Four Corners Regional Commission (FCRC) is a state-Federal partnership, the purpose of which is to initiate long-range planning, provide data for specific plans, promote private investment, promote legislation, establish plans and program priorities, and initiate and coordinate economic developmental districts in 92 counties in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. In the 1971 FCRC annual report, activities are described in the following areas: vocational-technical education, community facilities, health, agriculture, minerals and fuels, tourism and recreation, transportation, human resources, water, and industrial development. Graphs and tables show population growth, grant awards and technical assistance funds, and budget. Related documents are ED 048 985 and ED 048 986.    [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Annual Reports, Economic Development, Mexican Americans

Ludanyi, R. P.; Ehrlich, Roselin (1972). Santa Fe Bilingual-Bicultural Education Program. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs. This content analysis schedule for the Santa Fe Bilingual-Bicultural Education Program of Santa Fe, New Mexico, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project in its second year. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic background of project teachers. An assessment is made of the duration and extent of the bilingual component, and the methods of second language teaching in general. Included is an analysis of materials, student grouping, tutoring, curriculum patterns, and cognitive development. The report also discusses self-esteem, learning strategies, the bicultural and community components, and means of evaluation. This schedule, which has been verified, includes additional information books and audio-visual materials concerning bilingual education. Attached is an insert on the Human Development Program.   [More]  Descriptors: Biculturalism, Bilingualism, Cognitive Development, Content Analysis

Hess, Richard T.; And Others (1971). Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Albuquerque Public School Bicultural-Bilingual Program. This content analysis schedule for the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public School Bicultural-Bilingual Program presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic background of project teachers. An assessment is made of the duration and extent of the bilingual component, and the methods of second language teaching in general. Included is an analysis of materials, student grouping, tutoring, curriculum patterns, and cognitive development. The report also discusses self-esteem, learning strategies, the bicultural and community components, and means of evaluation. Attached to the report are a language dominance assessment, a report on staff development, a process evaluation, a list of techniques for second language teaching, and an evaluation report for the Coronado Project, 1970-71.   [More]  Descriptors: Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Cognitive Development, Content Analysis

La Noue, Joan (1971). Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Las Cruces Elementary School Bilingual Project. This content analysis schedule for the Elementary School Bilingual Project of Las Cruces, New Mexico, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic background of project teachers. An assessment is made of the duration and extent of the bilingual component, and the methods of second language teaching in general. Included is an analysis of materials, student grouping, tutoring, curriculum patterns, and cognitive development. The report also discusses self-esteem, learning strategies, the bicultural and community components, and means of evaluation. Inserts include a parent questionnaire, a description of training for paraprofessionals, and samples of instructional materials developed by the program.   [More]  Descriptors: Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Bilingualism, Cognitive Development

Mestas, Leonard Joseph (1970). Administrators' Opinions and Attitudes Concerning the Bureau of Indian Affairs Navajo Schools' Responsibility in Providing Education for Navajo Exceptional Children. The Navajo Reservation (which covers parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah and is approximately 24,000 square miles) was studied in terms of the special-education needs of all exceptional Navajo children enrolled (1969-70) and served by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in elementary schools of various types. The study involved getting questionnaire responses from reservation administrators of 57 BIA-administered schools and from 10 agency administrators. Attitudes were investigated by a 33-item questionnaire as to responsibility of the BIA school, responsibility of special education, pupil-placement plan, per-pupil teacher norm, and internal administrative responsibility. Administrators agreed that BIA should assume more responsibility in administering programs for exceptional children and that institutions should be responsible for deaf, blind, subtrainable, mentally retarded, and preschool blind children. The 6-part questionnaire is appended. Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Adult Education, American Indians, Doctoral Dissertations

Hill, Paul T. (1974). Research on Goals as a Means of Establishing Policy Agendas for That Public Service Called "Education". This paper introduces a National Institute of Education (NIE) project that is developing new methods for assessing layman's goals for education. The project also compares those goals with the goals of the professional educators. After elaborating the rationale that has guided NIE's studies of education goals, the paper describes the assumptions and procedures that make NIE's studies unique. Part one sets the context for the research by discussing the problem of tailoring public services in general (and education in particular) to achieve the goals which their clientele expect. Part two presents the framework for the research. Because of the preliminary nature of this study, its scope is limited to one site (Albuquerque, New Mexico) and to the secondary level of education.  Preliminary findings indicate that it is possible to obtain valid and complete information about goals for education, even from very unsophisticated respondents.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Citizen Participation, Educational Assessment, Educational Needs

General Electric Co., Washington, DC. TEMPO. (1969). Analysis of Seven Special Projects in Adult Basic Education. Final Report. This report summarizes innovations being developed in seven special adult basic education (ABE) projects: the Washington, D.C. ABE Demonstration Center; Opportunities Industrialization Center pupil recruitment and Adult Armchair Education projects in Philadelphia; Laborers' International Union participation in ABE in Columbus, Ohio; Southwest Cooperative Educational Laboratory televised English instruction in New Mexico for functionally illiterate, transient Mexican Americans; training in adult guidance and counseling by the University of Texas; job related ABE learning centers in Arkansas; and the Morehead State University (Kentucky) ABE demonstration project for the 13 state Appalachia region. Project elements of national significance are identified, and the project settings are described to enable potential users to judge whether they can use paraprofessionals, computer assisted instruction, or other specific innovations. A framework for project review is offered, followed by conclusions and recommendations on classification, project initiation, supervision, information dissemination, implementation of innovations, reporting, and evaluation.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Counseling, Demonstration Programs, Educational Innovation

Four Corners Regional Commission, Farmington, NM. (1969). Four Corners Regional Commission Second Annual Report, 1969. The Four Corners Regional Commission is a state-Federal partnership, the purpose of which is to initiate long-range planning, provide data for specific plans, promote private investment, promote legislation, establish plans and program priorities, and initiate and coordinate economic developmental districts in 92 counties in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. According to the 1969 annual report, planning and activities were conducted in the following areas: agriculture, minerals and fuels, recreation, tourism and retirement, transportation, human resources, water, and industrial development. Graphs and tables show land area and ownership, percent of employment, per capita income, the Four Corners Region job gap, grant awards, and budget. A related document is RC 005 231.    [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Annual Reports, Economic Development, Mexican Americans

Sotomayor, Frank (1974). Para Los Ninos — For the Children: Improving Education for Mexican Americans. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights conducted the Mexican American Education Study between 1969 and 1974. Drawn from the published and unpublished findings of this study, this report discusses the education of Mexican Americans in the 5 Southwestern states of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas, where about 85 percent of all Chicanos live. Additional material was obtained from interviews with students, parents, and educators throughout the Southwest. Topics discussed are: (1) the first day of school for a Chicano; (2) what students feel; (3) what teachers expect of Chicanos; (4) what schools are doing; and (5) bilingual/bicultural education. The report of the Mexican American Study are listed.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Attitude Change, Bilingual Education, Counselor Attitudes

Saavedra, Louis E. (1970). Vocational-Technical Education and the Mexican-American. The increased rise of technology is rapidly building the image of vocational education as a legitimate endeavor of public education. The poor esteem in which vocational education has been held results from the combined attitudes of students, parents, and educators, and is especially evident among minority groups because of its second-class status. Data drawn from a vocational technical institution in New Mexico indicate that the number of high school youth choosing vocational education does not differ significantly with regard to ethnic characteristics. However, more Spanish-surnamed young adults are enrolled in post high school programs, such as the Albuquerque Technical-Vocational Institute, than are students with other surnames. Additionally, once enrolled in vocational technical programs, Spanish-surnamed students tend to be more successful than students having other surnames.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Aptitude, Academic Failure, Age Differences, Educational Change

Pueblo of Zuni, NM. (1969). Zuni Comprehensive Development Plan. For a Better Zuni by '75. Volumes One and Two. The Zuni comprehensive development plan encompasses a variety of projects designed to achieve major development goals on the Zuni Indian reservation in New Mexico. The single overall planning objective is to raise the level of living for residents of the Zuni reservation to equal or to exceed the average for all United States citizens. Major program goals are (1) to increase individual income through creation of permanent employment opportunities on or near the reservation, (2) to enhance educational opportunity suited to local community needs, and (3) to improve living conditions through well-planned community programs and services. The document contains a program matrix portraying the main sections of the plan and highlighting cost, funding, and benefits over the 5-year (1971-75) planning period; summary tables on total funding requirements, funding sources, employment, and income; and project details, under each major goal, prefaced with summary tables on program funding, employment, and wages.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Community Programs, Curriculum Enrichment

Galarza, Ernesto; And Others (1969). Mexican-Americans in the Southwest. With findings as presented in this 1969 book, a 2-year field study conducted by a 3-member team analyzed the economic, cultural, political, and educational conditions of Mexican Americans in the Southwest (California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas) with some reference to braceros and the situation in Mexico. An overview of 8 geographic Mexican American groupings leads into a discussion of such topics as mobility, urbanization, the culture of poverty, educational disadvantagement, community infrastructure, and communication. Divisions within the minority group, situations creating cultural and political immobility, and problems in the administration of welfare programs are described and used as a backdrop for predictions that the Mexican American family will continue to need outside help and that the cost of social assistance will rise. A 23-point summary and an appendix containing 22 statistical tables on demography, education, and employment conclude the book. Descriptors: Acculturation, Anglo Americans, Blacks, Economic Status

Howard, Homer H. (1949). In Step with the States. A Comparison of State and Indian Service Educational Objectives and Methods. The purpose of this 1949 book is to summarize the beliefs of the education division of the United States Indian Service and to present summarized statements of the educational objectives and teaching practices of Alaska and the 15 states where the Indian Service operates schools. Part I answers such questions as how public schools are changing; are all public schools good schools; and why Indian schools change rapidly. The educational approach, the primary objectives of Indian schools, the provisions for individual differences, and surveys as foundations for curriculum development are additional topics discussed in Part I. Part II reviews courses of study in Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington. The course of study for Alaska's elementary and secondary territorial schools is examined in Part III.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Bilingual Education, Comparative Analysis, Course Objectives

Grebler, Leo; And Others (1970). The Mexican-American People: The Nation's Second Largest Minority. Based on over 4 years of research completed in 1968, this work "is the most comprehensive study to date" of the position of Mexican Americans in selected urban areas of 5 southwestern states (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas). Ranging over historical, cultural, religious, and political perspectives, the class structure, the family, and the Mexican American in a changing social world, the analysis contains 7 parts: "The Setting,""Historical Perspective,""Socioeconomic Conditions: A Detailed Portrait,""The Individual in the Social System,""The Role of Churches,""Political Interaction," and "Summary and Conclusions." Included are appendices to various chapters; a 1593-item bibliography; 147 tables, charts, maps, and figures; and a subject index.  Descriptors: Cultural Influences, Ethnic Studies, Family Relationship, Individual Characteristics

DeBlassie, Richard R.; Healy, Gary W. (1970). Self Concept: A Comparison of Spanish-American, Negro, and Anglo Adolescents Across Ethnic, Sex, and Socioeconomic Variables. The purposes of this 1969 study were to determine: (1) if differences existed in the self concepts of Negro, Anglo, and Spanish American adolescents and (2) the extent to which these differences were influenced by ethnic group membership, socioeconomic position, and sex. The sample for the study was made up of 425 Anglo, 40 Negro, and 142 Spanish American ninth-grade students in a school district in south central New Mexico. Instruments used in the study were the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS) and the Hollingshead Two Factor Index of Social Position. Results of the analysis indicated that of the 14 indices of self concept assessed by the TSCS, 4 scores were affected by the ethnicity variable. However, total self concept score was not significantly different for any of the 3 ethnic groups or for socioeconomic position. Male subjects had higher self concepts than female subjects with regard to physical appearance, health, skills, and sexuality.   [More]  Descriptors: Anglo Americans, Blacks, Comparative Analysis, Ethnic Groups

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