Bibliography: New Mexico (page 133 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include ROBERT L. SANDMEYER, Alfred P. Wilson, WILLARD P. BASS, Diane Talley Davis, Francisco Aguirre, Harold William Floyd, Geraldine de Berly, Linda Hawkins, Marty Christopher, and Gordon J. Ewing.

Gordon, Edmund W.; Jaramillo, Mari-Luci (1972). Process vs. Status in School Desegregation; Using Cultural Differences for Educational Success. The first paper in this booklet summarizes the desegregation strategies that have been used either singly or in combination to ethnically balance schools. An overview of the services and resources available to school districts from the National Center for Research and Information for Equal Educational Opportunities is also presented. Some of the recent information available regarding the effect of school desegregation on children, particularly minority children, is reviewed. The second paper discusses the role played by its author in drawing attention to cultural differences which exist between ethnic groups in New Mexico. The methods, that her Cultural Awareness Center uses in working with school personnel to demonstrate the meaning of the unique behavior styles of the various minority group children, are described. Several ways to impose cultural pluralism on a monolithic social system in a practical and effective way are discussed, including seminars, workshops, teacher development programs, and curriculum and attitudinal changes.   [More]  Descriptors: Behavior Patterns, Children, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Differences

de Berly, Geraldine (1995). Conflict Management in an International Teaching Assistant Training Program. This paper discusses how the management of conflict in an international teaching assistant (ITA) training program can benefit all stakeholders and maintain good will between departments and the ITA program by encompassing strategies for mutual gain. It focuses on how the ITA training program at New Mexico State University has resolved many of the conflicts that arise among students, departments, and the program. The paper examines sources of conflict and various conflict scenarios, as well as possible solutions to these conflicts, such as arrangements for late ITA training programs and screenings for students who are unaware of the requirement and close coordination with department heads and faculty to ensure that they are aware of the school's requirements for ITA training.    [More]  Descriptors: College Faculty, Conflict Resolution, Department Heads, Foreign Students

Loar, Robert L. (1974). "Zap — You're Sterile". A minicourse is any educational experience that involves a detailed and indepth study of a specific unit or subject, jointly planned by student and teacher, and for which less than a semester of time is used. Minicourses at Los Alamos High School, Los Alamos, New Mexico, are a part of their total packet of educational innovations, including open campus with its varying amounts of unstructured time for students, the involvement of students in all types of activities and on committees, and a school and community work-study program. The minicourse curriculum, standing on its own merits can work alone, or it can work in conjunction with traditional or other innovative programs.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Guides, Curriculum, Curriculum Development, Educational Innovation

Alisky, Marvin; And Others (1969). The Role of the Mexican American in the History of the Southwest. The booklet contains 6 papers presented at a conference sponsored by the Inter-American Institute, Pan American College, Edinburg, Texas. As indicated by the titles, the papers cover the following aspects of the role of the Mexican American in the history of the Southwest: (1) Mexican Heritage–Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California, (2) The Historical Heritage of the Mexican American in 19th Century Texas, An Interpretation, (3) The Migrant Worker and the Bracero in the U.S., (4) Mexican-American Land Issues in the United States, (5) The Rio Grande Frontier–Bridge or Barrier, and (6) Cultural Contributions of the Mexican American. Included in the booklet is a bibliography of related literature.   [More]  Descriptors: American History, Area Studies, Conferences, Cultural Awareness

Schlessman-Frost, Amy (1994). Collaboration in Adult ESL and Family Literacy Education. ERIC Digest. The current trend toward collaboration is having an impact on the fields of adult basic education and adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and literacy education. This digest looks at collaboration for adult ESL programs and for family bilingual and ESL literacy programs. It discusses the distinctions among cooperation, coordination, and collaboration; presents a framework for collaboration; reports on uses of technology for collaboration; and explores ethical considerations, evaluation concerns, and policy issues. Each of these areas is examined in turn, and it is concluded that: collaborative efforts can offer better services than individual agencies can offer separately; the democratic nature of collaboration should benefit all participants–while providing the best services to clients. An inset briefly notes two successful collaborations in New Mexico, one urban and one rural. (Contains 10 references.) (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse on ESL Literacy Education)   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Bilingual Education, Educational Cooperation, English (Second Language)

Davis, Diane Talley, Ed.; And Others (1995). Involving All Families: An Annotated Bibliography of Materials for Families Available in Languages Other than English. This bibliography resulted from an investigation into the process and feasibility of developing an annotated bibliography of educational materials available in languages other than English. Materials were obtained from California, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, and the District of Columbia. Forty-two document profiles offer abstracts of brochures, handbooks, pamphlets, dictionaries, correspondence courses, and videos. Profiles are arranged alphabetically by title. The majority of articles are in Spanish, but some documents are also found in American Sign Language, Chinese, French, Khmer, Laotian, Portuguese, Russian, and Vietnamese. Two index catalogues are provided: by language and by topics. Topics cover academics, health, development, training, environmental, and parental concerns. Each entry includes title, understanding rating, source, communication mode, description, and assigned descriptors.   [More]  Descriptors: American Sign Language, Annotated Bibliographies, Cambodian, Caregiver Role

Aguirre, Francisco; Hawkins, Linda (1996). Why Reinvent the Wheel? Let's Adapt Our Institutional Assessment Model. This paper reports on the implementation of an Integrated Assessment and Strategic Planning (IASP) process to comply with accountability requirements at the community college of New Mexico State University at Alamogordo. The IASP model adapted an existing compliance matrix and applied it to the business college program in 1995 to assess and improve program offerings and student learning. The model involves assessment of different program areas (clusters) on a rotating schedule over several years. The on-going business cluster assessment was originally expected to take 2.5 years to complete but initial success has allowed reduction of the timeline to 1.5 years. Assessment tools include surveys from the community, students, faculty, and employers; the new student data form; a survey of withdrawing students; and a high school survey. When all the data are collected, strengths and concerns will be evaluated. Extensive attachments include timelines, the matrix, and survey forms.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Advisory Committees, Business Education, Cluster Grouping

BASS, WILLARD P.; BURGER, HENRY G. (1967). AMERICAN INDIANS AND EDUCATIONAL LABORATORIES. MANY OF THE DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED FOR YEARS, BUT HAVE BEEN PERMITTED TO LAY DORMANT. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGEMENT IS EXHIBITED IN AREAS OF INCOME, UNEMPLOYMENT, SCHOOL DROPOUT RATE, EXPECTED LIFE SPAN, INFANT MORTALITY RATE, BIRTH RATE, AND HEALTH HISTORY. COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS BLOCK THE TEACHING-LEARNING EFFORT. THE SOCIAL SCIENTISTS' INTEREST IN ACCULTURATING THE INDIAN INTO THE AMERICAN NORM IS SEEN AS BEING FOCUSED UPON THE CHILDREN – THOSE WHO CAN LEAST RESIST IT. EFFORTS BY FIVE REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL LABORATORIES ARE DIRECTED TOWARD SOLVING SOME OF THE IDENTIFIED PROBLEMS. NEEDS REMAINING TO BE MET INCLUDE TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT, COMPENSATORY INNOVATION, SUBJECT COVERAGE, CROSS-CULTURAL SENSITIVITY FOR TEACHERS, INFORMATION CARRY-OVER, EVALUATION, SEPARATING EDUCATION FROM ETHNOCENTRISM, AND CORRELATING SCHOOL AND HOME LIFE. SINGLE FREE COPIES OF THIS DOCUMENT ARE AVAILABLE FROM SOUTHWESTERN COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL LABORATORY, INC., 117 RICHMOND DRIVE, N.E., ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 87106.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, American Indians, Bilingualism, Disadvantaged

Link, Martin A., Ed. (1968). Navajo: A Century of Progress, 1868-1968. The year 1968 marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Peace between the Navajo tribe and the U.S. Government. The treaty, signed by 29 Navajo headmen and 10 officers of the U.S. Army on June 1, 1968, brought to an end a tragic period of suffering, hardship, deprivation, and exile at the Bosque Redondo, New Mexico. During the intervening century, the Navajo people have witnessed a substantial population increase and have undergone drastic and far-reaching changes in their economy, self-government, social status, education, and living conditions. The photographs, with accompanying text, capture a century of progress (1868-1968) for the Navajo Tribe. The contents include Dinneh: The People; A Time for Suffering; The Treaty; Exodus; A New Beginning; and A Time for Living. Descriptors: American History, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Economic Development

CARROLL, JOHN B.; AND OTHERS (1966). A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF LANGUAGE TRAINING IN THE PEACE CORPS. FINAL REPORT. A STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO INVESTIGATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING IN BOTH INTRAINING AND FIELD PROGRAMS OF THE PEACE CORPS, AND TO DETERMINE INDIVIDUAL AND EXPERIENCE FACTORS AFFECTING THE RATE OF LANGUAGE LEARNING. THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO DEVELOP A PROTOTYPE FOR A PARAMETRIC STUDY INVOLVING SUCH FACTORS AS LANGUAGE APTITUDE AND PRIOR LANGUAGE TRAINING. A TOTAL OF 444 TRAINEES IN SPANISH AND 51 TRAINEES IN PORTUGUESE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO WERE GIVEN PLACEMENT TESTS AND LANGUAGE APTITUDE AND PROFICIENCY TESTS AT VARIOUS STAGES OF THE TRAINING PROGRAM. RESULTS SHOWED THAT PRIOR KNOWLEDGE, NOT APTITUDE, DETERMINED THE DEGREE OF FLUENCY. A FOLLOWUP STUDY WAS DONE IN THE FIELD WITH SIMILAR RESULTS. RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE RESPECTING (1) LENGTH OF COURSE, (2) FURTHER TRAINING IN THE FIELD, (3) THE IMPORTANCE OF VARIABLES SUCH AS APTITUDE AND PRIOR KNOWLEDGE IN TRAINEE SELECTION, AND (4) DEVELOPMENT OF A PROGRAM OF LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY MEASUREMENT.   [More]  Descriptors: Aptitude, Language Instruction, Language Programs, Language Tests

SANDMEYER, ROBERT L. (1966). FISCAL STRUCTURE OF OKLAHOMA, AN OVERVIEW. THE REPORT WAS DIVIDED INTO THREE MAJOR SECTIONS–(1) THE PRODUCTION POSSIBILITY CURVE WAS USED TO DEMONSTRATE THE PROBLEM OF RESOURCE ALLOCATION BETWEEN THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS, (2) STATE AND LOCAL REVENUES WERE EXAMINED IN TERMS OF FISCAL CAPACITY AND TAX EFFORT, AND (3) EXPENDITURES ON SELECTED FUNCTIONS OF GOVERNMENT IN OKLAHOMA WERE COMPARED WITH EXPENDITURES OF SELECTED STATES AND WITH THE NATIONAL AVERAGE. OKLAHOMA WAS FOUND TO HAVE A RELATIVELY LOW FISCAL CAPACITY BUT A STRONG TAX EFFORT. FINDINGS FURTHER INDICATED THAT (1) EXPENDITURES ON EDUCATION WERE BELOW THE AVERAGES FOR THE FOUR-STATE REGION INCLUDING ARIZONA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS AND THE NATION, (2) EXPENDITURES ON HIGHWAYS WERE ABOUT EQUAL TO THE NATIONAL AVERAGE AND SLIGHTLY BELOW THE AVERAGE FOR THE FOUR-STATE REGION, AND (3) PER-CAPITA STATE AND LOCAL EXPENDITURES ON PUBLIC WELFARE WAS HIGH. A MORE THOROUGH STUDY OF THE STATE'S FISCAL STRUCTURE WAS RECOMMENDED.   [More]  Descriptors: City Government, Expenditures, Federal Government, Financial Policy

Ewing, Gordon J. (1986). Predicting Grades in Chemistry 101. This study was designed to help students decide whether or not to register for a general chemistry course. High school grade point averages (GPAs) and American College Testing (ACT) scores were obtained on over 600 students from New Mexico State University and were entered into correlation analysis with chemistry grades. A "Chemistry GPA" was determined for each ACT score and for each interval of 0.1 in the high school GPA and then was plotted versus the appropriate ACT scores or high school GPAs. It was found that students who had a high school GPA below 3.3 or a composite ACT score below 19 had less than a 50 percent chance of obtaining a grade of C or better in the general chemistry course. Courses are suggested for students to take prior to taking the general chemistry course. Descriptors: Academic Aptitude, Chemistry, College Science, Grade Prediction

Case, Elizabeth J.; Christopher, Marty (1989). Pilot Study of the Writing To Read System. The paper describes the Writing to Read instructional system and its implementation in five Albuquerque (New Mexico) public schools with kindergarten, first grade, and special education students. The Writing to Read System is a multisensory, multimedia literacy program and involves five types of materials: a computer-based instructional program; correlated student work journals; word processing; language-development activities; and use of read-along tapes of children's literature. Students use the program for 1 hour each day. Pretests and posttests given 2 months apart were used to evaluate the program. Major findings indicated that, on standardized reading tests, kindergarten and primary special education students receiving the Writing to Read instruction progressed almost five times faster than did students in the comparison group. In addition, the Writing to Read System proved to be an effective intervention strategy for students who had been referred for special education testing but who had not yet been tested or placed. Contains nine references.   [More]  Descriptors: Beginning Reading, Computer Assisted Instruction, Disabilities, Grade 1

Floyd, Harold William (1972). A Study of Student Rights and School Authority with Regard to Long-Term Suspensions. The specific objectives of this study were to survey the implementation at Las Cruces High School, New Mexico, of an appeal board through which students may appeal suspension recommendations of over 5 days; to review the issues behind the student rights movement; to define and evaluate the invariant structure of authority in the school; to evaluate the attitudes of students, parents, and teachers regarding the "new due process"; and to establish or disestablish validity for the hearing board. Questionnaires were distributed to teachers, students, and parents of students at Las Cruces High School. The answers for the various subgroups were calculated into percentages and categorized, according to the 8 questionnaire items, into 3 or 4 possible answers. Major findings were that analysis of student rights, due process, and administrative procedures cannot be made apart from analysis of institutional goals with regard to student offenders and that the majority of respondents value responsibility to the school.   [More]  Descriptors: Attitude Change, Authoritarianism, Civil Rights, Community Attitudes

Wilson, Alfred P.; Moon, Edward L. (1972). Valuing Employee Benefits by Teachers of Small Schools. The primary focus of this study was to report the value that teachers in small schools placed on employee benefits. The Employee Benefits Questionnaire, an attitude measuring instrument, was sent to 266 teachers representing 19% of the school districts in New Mexico. From the 79.9% response, respondents were found to be about 59% tenured, 34% male, and approximately 50% elementary teachers. The results indicated that of the 51 items included in the questionnaire, 11 were ranked 3 or more rankings apart. It was further indicated that the differences which existed between tenured and non-tenured, male and female, and elementary and secondary teachers were so small that the groups seemed to be homogeneous. The top 3 benefits, as evidenced by teacher response to this questionnaire, were freedom to determine teaching methods, small student-teacher ratio, and accumulative sick leave.   [More]  Descriptors: Elementary School Teachers, Employee Attitudes, Fringe Benefits, Secondary School Teachers

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