Bibliography: New Mexico (page 134 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Congress of the U.S, Harvey Rude, Roxanne Gorman, M. T. Tatto, Gilbert Clark, Enid Zimmerman, Walter Blackford, Jay Gurley, Washington Department of Labor, and Dean Chavers.

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. (1975). The University of New Mexico Faculty Handbook. This faculty handbook includes the faculty constitution, affirmative action plan, full statement on such policies as tenure, extramural utterances, research and publication (including classified research), off campus speakers, acceptance of gifts, etc. Faculty-student relations procedures are also detailed.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Standards, Administrative Organization, Administrative Policy, College Faculty

Tatto, M. T. (2002). The Value and Feasibility of Evaluation Research on Teacher Development: Contrasting Experiences in Sri Lanka and Mexico, International Journal of Educational Development. This article discusses the value and feasibility of carrying out evaluation research on teacher development and uses as points of reference the author's experiences in two countries, Sri Lanka and Mexico. In Sri Lanka, an evaluation study was designed to understand the effectiveness and costs of teacher development at the elementary level linking teacher preparation with classroom practice and student achievement. The study also evaluated costs and analyzed the possible impact of the results for future policy. The study in Mexico illustrates the challenges of doing evaluation research in an environment dominated by a central state and teacher union politics, and where systemic empirical research on teacher development has been rare. It constituted an initial attempt at looking at the content and the anticipated effects across different approaches to teacher development in Mexico. New calls for greater accountability and better understanding of the reach and limitations of general education worldwide are prompting systems to examine teacher development program effectiveness. In this analytical article, the author discusses strategies and possibilities in the emerging field of teacher development program evaluation.   [More]  Descriptors: Evaluation Research, Program Evaluation, Program Effectiveness, Unions

Hill, Deborah J., Ed. (1986). Study Abroad in the Eighties. Papers Presented at a Conference on American Academic Programs Abroad (3rd, Pamplona, Spain, July 1985). Issues concerning study abroad in the 1980s are addressed in 10 selected conference papers. Topics include program design, low-cost financing, curriculum design, academic standards, summer study programs, an exchange program between the University of South Florida and University of Paris VII, internationalizing the community college, curriculum design at Wesley College, advertising and recruiting techniques at Marquette University, Latin America exchange programs administered by the University of Pittsburgh, program design at Rutgers University, Marist Abroad Programs, and administration of the University of New Mexico program. Article titles and authors are as follows: "Exchange and Study Programs for University Professors and Students" (C. Eugene Scruggs); "International Studies and Study Abroad for the Two-Year College Curriculum" (Elizabeth Q. Espadas); "The Role of the Administrative Director in a Successful Year Abroad Program" (Armando Gonzalez-Perez); "Opportunities and Constraints in Financing Study Abroad Programs: Institutional, Faculty, and Staff Commitments and Subsidies" (James A. Van Fleet); "Financing a Study Abroad Program: One College's Approach" (Jeptha H. Lanning); "Funding Summer Abroad Programs at the University of New Mexico" (Bruce Tracy); "Small Is Beautiful: Getting Students from Pitt to Latin America, 1972-1985" (Reid Reading); "Independent Study within the Study Abroad Program" (Mary Lee Bretz); "Study Abroad: Experiential Learning and Academics" (Henry Geitz); and "Is Summer Study Abroad Worth It? For the Students? For the Director?" (Christopher J. Eustis).   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Standards, Administrator Responsibility, Community Colleges, Curriculum Design

Chavers, Dean, Ed. (1996). Exemplary Programs in Indian Education. Second Edition. This directory profiles 16 exemplary programs serving American Indian students in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, and community adult education programs. An introduction discusses what "exemplary" means, the history of Indian education, the lack of Indian programs in the National Diffusion Network's (NDN) directory of exemplary programs, characteristics of exemplary programs, and other exemplary programs in the United States. Each program entry contains: contact information, program focus, population served, personnel, sources of support, indicators used to measure program success, changes in baseline indicators over time, evaluation methods, technology use, details of program features contributing to success, comments on program replication, outreach efforts, parent involvement, student selection, and recognition or awards received. The projects and their sites or sponsors are: (1) Dropout Prevention Program (Cass Lake Local Indian Education Committee, Minnesota); (2) Indian Homework Centers (Davis County Indian Parent Association, Utah); (3) Denver Adult Education Program (Native American MultiEducational School, Colorado); (4) Ganado Primary School (Arizona); (5) Cool School Project (Ganado Intermediate School, Arizona); (6) MESBEC (math, engineering, science, business, education, computers) Scholarship Program (Native American Scholarship Fund, New Mexico); (7) Mississippi Choctaw Adult Education Program (Mississippi Choctaw Tribe); (8) Total Quality Management Program (Mount Edgecumbe High School, Alaska); (9) National Honors Program (National American Indian Honor Society, Arizona); (10) Tradition and Technology (Peach Springs School District, Arizona); (11) Individual Student Learning Program (Rock Ledge School District, Wisconsin); (12) Salmon River Central School Indian Education Project (New York); (13) Tohatchi High School Career Center (New Mexico); (14) Student Support Services Project (University of Alaska-Fairbanks); (15) Focus on Excellence Program (Wellpinit School District, Washington); and (16) Native American Student Services (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Appendices include contact information for agencies selecting exemplary programs, criteria for exemplary status in this directory, and criteria for NDN exemplary status.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, American Indian Education, American Indians, Educational Improvement

Blackford, Walter (1974). Conservation and Environmental Education in the Western States. Second Edition. In an effort to facilitate cooperation on a state and regional basis to develop and support environmental education programs, the Western Regional Environmental Education Project is being conducted. The purpose of this report is to provide data on the status of state level programs conducted by Departments of Education and resource management agencies. A separate report is compiled for each state covering the following topics: state laws or policies; educational agency–activities and responsibilities; resources agency–activities and responsibilities; outstanding local programs; state level advisory committee; special state funding programs; testing and evaluation; resident outdoor programs; and additional information. Also included are a general summary of the above information; conclusions in the areas of personnel, funding, legislation, state agency cooperation, and evaluation; a data summary chart; list of state publications; and a list of council members from the 13 western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.   [More]  Descriptors: Conservation Education, Environmental Education, Natural Resources, Programs

Rude, Harvey; Gorman, Roxanne (1996). Navajo Nation Teacher Education Initiative. The Navajo Teacher Education Initiative was developed in 1992 to improve the quality of Navajo education through the recruitment and training of prospective Navajo educators. Currently, the 242 schools on or near the Navajo Nation are staffed primarily by non-Navajo teachers who often do not understand the significance of Navajo culture, history, language, and values. The Navajo Nation is the largest reservation in the United States and is located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. Members of the initiative include Navajo Community College, the University of New Mexico, Northern Arizona University, Prescott College, Fort Lewis College, the University of Northern Colorado, and the Navajo Nation Division of Education. Objectives of the initiative include planning and implementing an integrated field-based teacher education program through a consortium of colleges and universities; integrating Navajo philosophy, language, and culture into required teacher education courses; developing a monitoring system for assessment of pilot projects; implementing a computerized Navajo teacher education tracking system; expanding curriculum developed by Navajo Community College and based on the Dine' Philosophy of Learning to other consortium members; disseminating best teaching practices through publications and presentations; and influencing legislative and policy development agendas regarding alternative teacher education efforts and funding policies. In November 1995, the Ford Foundation (sponsor of the consortium) and the American Association for Colleges of Teacher Education cosponsored a Navajo Nation Education Policy Forum that attracted 200 representatives of state education agencies, universities, state legislatures, local education agencies, and community and business interests. As a result of the forum, priority policy areas were identified.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, American Indian Education, American Indian Reservations, Consortia

Alfero, Charles (1994). Perspectives of "Health" in the Rural Context. Keynote Address. This paper explores the broad definition of health in the rural context and relates it to policy, practice, and pedagogical challenges in providing access to services in rural areas. Historically, policy, practice, and teaching institutions have supported a dependency model for health service delivery, forcing rural communities to rely on urban-oriented health policy, urban-based training models, corporate or large bureaucratic service delivery structures, and specialized care incentives not easily supportable in sparsely populated areas. In New Mexico, the percentage of population over 65 in nonmetropolitan areas is 14.1 percent. Additionally, there is a 32 percent difference in income between urban and rural people in New Mexico. These retiree and income statistics translate to a lack of tax base and political voice for rural populations compared to their urban counterparts. Rural health services are inadequate and there are insufficient providers. Although a critical component of a system of services, traditional services are crisis-oriented and "fixative." That is, providers are taught to simply fix physical and emotional problems, failing to respond to the underlying causes of trauma. It is only when root problems are addressed in the community setting that the health system becomes truly effective and curative. Financing strategies should include the following objectives: developing programs that support locally "grown" and trained primary health care professionals, changing the perception that rural communities are incapable of performing complex or high-technology tasks, establishing a strong health promotion and illness prevention component, maintaining a primary care focus, and developing appropriate non-community-based relationships. This paper also addresses the role of health policy, support systems, and community development in meeting these goals.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Health Care, Agency Cooperation, Community Involvement, Delivery Systems

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. (1991). Channel One, Educational Television and Technology. Hearing on Examining Current Educational Television Programming and To Examine New Technologies Which Could Impact the Future of Educational Television, Focusing on Channel One, a News and Information Program Designed for a Teen-Age Audience, before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session. The purpose of this hearing was to get a sense of the larger picture of what educational television is currently doing, what the alternative modes for educational television are, the merits of the programming that is currently available, what the documented educational impact in schools that have used educational TV has been, the types of policy concerns that exist, how the Federal Government might help educators attend to the needs of students of all ages, and the direction for educational technology in the classroom in the next decade. A topic of particular concern was public school participation in "Channel One," a news and public affairs program that includes commercials, and involves the donation of equipment to schools with the proviso that a specified percentage of students watch the program at the same time everyday without interruptions. Following the opening statement by Jeff Bingaman, Senator from New Mexico, prepared statements were presented by: (1) Linda G. Roberts, Senior Associate of the Science Education and Transportation Program, Office of Technology Assessment; (2) Laura Eshbaugh, Vice Chairman of Whittle Communications, Knoxville, Tennessee; (3) Gary R. Rowe, Senior Vice President, Turner Educational Services, Atlanta, Georgia; (4) Sandra H. Welch, Executive Vice President, Education Services, Public Broadcasting Service, Alexandria, Virginia; (5) Frank Mankiewicz, Vice Chairman, Hill and Knowlton Public Affairs Worldwide, Washington, D.C.; (6) Gary Tydings, Executive Director, Professional Engineering Development and Instructional Television, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; (7) Claiborne Pell, Senator from Rhode Island; and (8) Bill Honig, State Superintendent of Public Instruction for California.   [More]  Descriptors: Broadcast Television, Curriculum Development, Educational Technology, Educational Television

Steinhaus, Kurt A. (1991). Educational Technology: Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade. This report presents the findings and conclusions of a study of educational technology in New Mexico schools. Designed to provide baseline information to the New Mexico Education Technology Planning Committee, the results of the study will also be used to help make statewide planning decisions concerning educational technology. The findings indicate that: (1) there is a wide range in the level of available educational technology among individual schools; (2) microcomputers are the predominant technological medium currently in use, with audioplayers and television next; (3) distance learning options for most students are limited, with only 10% of the schools having a modem for telecommunications; (4) long range plans for integrating technology need to be developed at each school site; (5) students most often use software for practice, tutorials, and word processing, teachers for word processing, and administrators for instructional management and administrative tasks; (6) the need for staff development is high, particularly in the form of training in computer skills for teachers; (7) funding for educational technology comes from a variety of sources, of which one is the school district; (8) about 85% of the educational technology equipment is well maintained and in good repair; and (9) there is a wide variety of innovative technology applications in both rural and urban schools throughout the state. The report includes a discussion of the design of the study, an inventory of computer use, discussions of curriculum and staff development, and a description of funding efforts. A glossary of terms and a list of schools that responded to the survey are appended. (18 charts) Descriptors: Computer Software, Computer Uses in Education, Distance Education, Educational Technology

Clark, Gilbert; Zimmerman, Enid (1997). Project ARTS: Programs for Ethnically Diverse, Economically Disadvantaged, High Ability, Visual Arts Students in Rural Communities: Identification, Curriculum, Evaluation. This publication reports findings related to "Project ARTS: Arts for Rural Teachers and Students," a collaborative program among Indiana University, New Mexico State University, and Converse College in South Carolina. Seven rural elementary schools in those three states were also selected to participate. This report provides an overview of the project and findings relative to the identification, curriculum development, and assessment and evaluation phases of the project. The present findings contribute to a better understanding of how to identify, and provide appropriate educational services to underrepresented and undeserved artistically talented students in rural schools and help achieve equal access in selecting students from all walks of life for visual arts programs for students with high abilities. The report contains four parts. Part 1, "Introduction," is an overview of the purpose of Project ARTS and it also provides a Project ARTS Site personnel list. Part 2, "Identification," includes identification programs and instruments, local measures and criteria, research data pertaining to achievement and the arts, gender and age. it also includes references and identification forms used in Indiana, New Mexico and South Carolina. Part 3, "Curricula," covers community based art education and curricula outcomes at all sites and also includes references and examples in the same three states. Part 4, "Assessment," reviews community based authentic assessments that support art talent development in rural communities, authentic assessments used at Project ARTS sites and references. Also included are assessments and assessment forms for the three states.   [More]  Descriptors: Art, Art Education, Cooperative Programs, Curriculum

Department of Labor, Washington, DC. (1962). FARM LABOR MARKET DEVELOPMENT. PART ONE OF THE REPORT CONSISTED OF AN ANALYSIS OF TRENDS BETWEEN 1960 AND 1961 IN WAGES OF UNITED STATES FARM WORKERS IN MAJOR AREAS USING MEXICAN NATIONALS. THE DATA WERE DERIVED FROM PREVAILING-WAGE REPORTS RECEIVED BY THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY FROM AFFILIATED STATE EMPLOYMENT SECURITY AGENCIES. THE SURVEY RATES WERE USED BY THE SECRETARY OF LABOR IN DETERMINING THE RATE TO BE PAID TO FOREIGN WORKERS DOING SIMILAR WORK IN THE SAME AREA. IN 1961, APPROXIMATELY 291,000 MEXICAN CONTRACT WORKERS WERE USED IN 24 STATES, ABOUT 97 PERCENT OF WHOM WORKED IN ARIZONA, ARKANSAS, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, MICHIGAN, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS. WAGE RATES ROSE ALMOST THREE PERCENT IN THE AREAS ANALYZED, WITH CALIFORNIA LEADING IN THE RATE RISE. TOTAL SEASONAL HIRED WORKER EMPLOYMENT WAS DOWN. IN TEXAS, RATES ROSE SLIGHTLY, IN ARIZONA, RATES DROPPED SLIGHTLY, MAINLY DUE TO A DROP OF NEARLY FOUR PERCENT IN THE RATES PAID IN THE LETTUCE HARVEST. IN ARKANSAS RATES DECLINED BECAUSE A DROP IN COTTON CHOPPING RATES MORE THAN OFFSET A RISE IN COTTON PICKING RATES. IN NEW MEXICO, RATES FOR PREHARVEST ACTIVITIES ROSE. IN COLORADO AND MICHIGAN WAGE ADVANCES WERE LARGELY THE RESULT OF INCREASES IN SUGAR BEET CULTIVATION RATES. BASED ON THE RATE FINDINGS, AN ADVERSE EFFECT DETERMINATION WAS ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY. THIS PROVIDED THAT THE EMPLOYMENT OF MEXICAN NATIONALS AT HOURLY RATES IN 22 STATES COULD NOT BE AUTHORIZED BELOW CERTAIN RATES, RANGING FROM 60 CENTS TO ONE DOLLAR, DEPENDING UPON THE STATE. PART TWO OF THE REPORT CONSISTED OF PREVAILING-WAGE DETERMINATIONS ISSUED DURING 1961 FOR THE SEVEN MAJOR STATES EMPLOYING MEXICAN NATIONALS. Descriptors: Agricultural Laborers, Braceros, Data Analysis, Farm Labor

Gurley, Jay (1985). Visual Arts in Community Colleges: Enhancing the Learning Environment. Art exhibits on college campuses not only foster aesthetic appreciation and knowledge, but they also stimulate and encourage community involvement. In New Mexico, public and institutional policies permit the purchase of art to enhance public buildings, including institutions of higher education. At Eastern New Mexico University's Clovis Campus (ENMU-Clovis), a branch campus serving a community college mission, funds were set aside from the capital outlay appropriations for the purchase of art. A committee of local community citizens and faculty members was appointed to recommend purchases, commissions, collections, and displays of art works in buildings. In addition, the committee established criteria for the selection of art works, and provided incentives for gifts and loans that added to the college's collection. The visual arts program at ENMU-Clovis has had numerous tangible and intangible benefits, including: (1) donors to the arts program have received tax savings, while the institution has realized an appreciation in the value of certain collectibles; (2) the art faculty has been prompted to conduct student art shows each semester; and (3) art exhibits are at least contiguous to various areas of work and study and therefore more readily accessible to students, faculty, guests, and all other employees. In the years to come, leadership from within the college and community, supported by national, state, and regional humanities organizations, will have important goals to attain and decisions to render so that the users of its facilities will continue to have the opportunity to view, touch, and experience quality works of art through its visual arts program.   [More]  Descriptors: Aesthetic Education, Art Appreciation, Art Education, Art Products

Hernandez-Chavez, Eduardo, Ed.; And Others (1975). El Lenguaje de los Chicanos (The Language of Chicanos). Regional and Social Characteristics of Language Used by Mexican Americans. The following articles are included in this anthology on Chicano speech: (1) "Mexican Spanish," D.N. Cardenas; (2) "The Archaic and the Modern in the Spanish of New Mexico," J. Ornstein; (3) "Problemas Lexicograficos del Espanol del Sudoeste," A.M. Espinosa, Jr.; (4) "Associative Interference in New Mexican Spanish," J.B. Rael; (5) "Some Aspects of Arizona Spanish," A.C. Post; (6) "Dialectal and Nonstandard Forms in Texas Spanish," D.M. Lance; (7) "Variations in Los Angeles Spanish Phonology," R.N. Phillips, Jr.; (8) "El Habla y la Educacion de los Ninos de Origen Mexicano en Los Angeles," Y. Lastra de Suarez; (9) "Chicano Spanish Dialects and Education," E. Garcia; (10) "Spanish-English Bilingualism in San Antonio, Texas," J.B. Sawyer; (11) "Speech Mixture in New Mexico: The Influence of the English Language on New Mexican Spanish," A.M. Espinosa; (12) "Adaptation of English Borrowing," J.D. Bowen; (13) "Some Lexical Characteristics of San Jose Spanish," A. Beltramo and A. de Porcel; (14) "Spanish-English Code Switching," D.M. Lance; (15) "Cognitive Aspects of Bilingual Communication," J.J. Gumperz and E. Hernandez-Chavez; (16) "Chicano Multilingualism and Multiglossia," F. Penalosa; (17) "Social Functions of Language in a Mexican-American Community," G.C. Barker; (18) "Pachuco: An American-Spanish Argot and Its Social Function in Tucson, Arizona," G.C. Barker; (19) "Assessing Language Maintenance in Spanish-Speaking Communities in the Southwest," A.D. Cohen; and (20) "The Acquisition of Grammatical Structures by Mexican-American Children," G. Gonzalez.  Descriptors: Bilingualism, Child Language, Code Switching (Language), Cognitive Processes

White House Conference on Families, Washington, DC. (1980). White House Conference on Families: Summary of State Reports. Volume Three. This compilation contains the verbatim texts of recommendations made by states' delegates from 20 western states participating in the Los Angeles regional conference of the White House Conference on Families. The recommendations are organized by topic for each of the individual states. Topics include the following as related to the family: child care; governmental intervention; cultural and ethnic diversity; employment; alcohol and drug abuse; domestic violence; taxes; special needs; housing; education; the legal system; the media; divorce; energy; preventive health programs; communication; marriage; parenting; the workplace; the elderly; social services; transportation; insurance and pensions; business and industry; parenthood education; women's roles; pornography; abortion; agriculture; nutrition; children's rights; and human reproduction. States participating in the Los Angeles conference were Alaska, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, the Pacific Trust Territories, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.   [More]  Descriptors: Conferences, Day Care, Economic Status, Education

Sonnichsen, C. L. (1973). The Mescalero Apaches. The Civilization of the American Indian Series. The history of the Eastern Apache tribe called the Mescaleros is one of hardship and oppression altering with wars of revenge. They were friendly to the Spaniard until victimized by them. They were also friendly to the white man until they were betrayed again. For three hundred years they fought the Spaniards and Mexicans. For forty more they fought the white men, before subsiding into a long period of lethargy and discouragement. Only since 1930 have they made real progress. In the early days their principal range was between the Rio Grande and the Pecos rivers in New Mexico, but it extended also into the Staked Plains and southward into Mexico. They moved about freely, wintering on the Rio Grande or farther south, ranging the buffalo plains in the summer, following the sun and the food supply. They owned nothing and everything. Now they are in a precarious economic condition, they are recognized as American citizens and still own their reservation in the Tularosa country of New Mexico. Their children are beginning to go away to college and prepare themselves for leadership, and while in many ways they have not bridged the gap between their old life and the new, they have made amazing progress. Their story is told from the earliest records to the present day, from the Indian's point of view. Cruel and revengeful as this tribe was at times, they always had more than sufficient provocation, and a catalog of the sins committed against them is revealing, even appalling, to the white reader. Descriptors: American History, American Indian Culture, American Indian Literature, American Indian Reservations

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