Bibliography: New Mexico (page 137 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Patricia Seppanen, Dayton Education Law Association, Frederick C. Kintzer, Inc. Johnson (Lawrence) and Associates, Robert M. Simmons, Gladys H. Mills, Margaret T. Lane, Lauri Kram, and B. J. Busch.

Lane, Margaret T., Comp.; Goldsmith, Jan, Comp.; Kram, Lauri, Comp. (1996). A Guide to the Documents on Documents Collection, 1984-1995. This guide to the "Documents on Documents Collection" describes 223 documents gathered during 1984-95. The collection consists of materials used in the administration of state documents depository programs, including: (1) bibliographies; (2) commentaries and letters; (3) depository contracts; (4) forms and form letters; (5) labels; (6) legislation and legal materials; (7) mailing lists; (8) manuals; (9) procedural guidelines; (10) promotional materials; (11) selection lists; (12) shipping lists; and (13) studies, surveys, and workshops. Following entries for preliminary materials (i.e., materials that relate to the collection as a whole or to several states) and regional materials, the entries in the guide are arranged alphabetically by state and, within each state, by topic and year of receipt. Materials from the following 39 states are included: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Some of the items listed are not included in the microfiche collection due to copyright restrictions or other reasons. Descriptors: Depository Libraries, Government Publications, Library Administration, Library Collections

Education Law Association, Dayton, OH. (2001). A Legal Odyssey, 2001. Preconference Seminar Outlines [of the] Education Law Association Annual Conference (47th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 15-17, 2001). This document contains preconference seminar outlines for the 47th Annual Education Law Association (ELA) Conference. The first of four sections, "Americans with Disabilities Act Update–Higher Education and Employees," by Christopher P. Borreca, presents legal issues related to the Americans with Disabilities Act, an adequate definition of "disability," medical and fitness-for-duty exams, among other subjects. The second section, "Technology and Teaching School Law," by Gregory A. Boris and others, comments on the use of technology such as the Internet, audio and visual media, interactive media, and graphics for classroom and long-distance law instruction. The third section, "Issues Faced by Schools in the Digital Age," by Dana T. Buckman and R. Craig Wood, covers topics involving school district liability for electronic communications, equal access for individuals with disabilities, and physical security of technological equipment. The fourth section, "Special Education K-12," contains material relating to the impact of IDEA procedural violations on special-education appeals, student discipline, and an IDEA update. Descriptors: Accessibility (for Disabled), Computer Assisted Instruction, Computer Graphics, Disabilities

National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Alexandria, VA. (1991). A Study of Selected State Policies on Upper Age Mandates and Alternatives to a Regular Diploma. This study investigated the upper age educational mandates of 15 states and the policies regarding alternative awards to the regular diploma in 19 states. The study was based on analysis of state policy documents, a 1990 state survey of exiting procedures, and telephone conversations with state education agency officials. The first section addresses the upper age mandates established by the states of Alabama, California, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia. Three questions were addressed: (1) the upper age limit for service eligibility in the selected states and whether students are allowed to complete the school year during which they reach this age; (2) conditions placed on serving students over the age of 18; and (3) state provisions allowing local education agencies to determine whether students above the age of 18 will be served. The second section presents information on how state policies define "program completion," as well as what types of awards are given to recognize program completion or graduation. The paper concludes that the most common forms of alternative award were certificates of completion or completion of the Individualized Education Program. States were found to vary widely in their interpretation of "certificate of completion." An appendix, which comprises most of the document, provides excerpts from state policies on this issue. Information is provided for Alabama, California, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia.   [More]  Descriptors: Age, Chronological Age, Compliance (Legal), Disabilities

Busch, B. J. (1985). Automation and Reorganization of Technical and Public Services. SPEC Kit 112. This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) kit is based partially on the results of a fall, 1984 survey of the 117 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members to determine the extent to which they have reorganized staff and the role played by automation in planning organizational change. Particular attention was paid to the integration of public and technical services functions. Of the 82 respondents, 46 indicate they are currently organized along traditional technical services/public services lines and 36 report some integration; no respondents report complete integration. The kit contains statistical survey results and a copy of the survey, as well as program descriptions, annual reports, organization charts, recommendations, and job descriptions. The following United States and Canadian institutions are represented: Boston University; Brigham Young University; University of British Columbia; University of California at Los Angeles; University of Illinois; University of New Mexico; New York University; Ohio State University; Pennsylvania State University; University of Texas at Austin; University of Waterloo; Wayne State University; and York University. Descriptors: Academic Libraries, Cataloging, Higher Education, Library Administration

Lane, Margaret T., Comp.; Goldsmith, Jan, Comp.; Kram, Lauri, Comp. (1996). Documents on Documents Collection, 1984-1995. This collection of approximately 200 documents gathered during 1984-95 consists of materials used in the administration of state documents depository programs, including: (1) bibliographies; (2) commentaries and letters; (3) depository contracts; (4) forms and form letters; (5) labels; (6) legislation and legal materials; (7) mailing lists; (8) manuals; (9) procedural guidelines; (10) promotional materials; (11) selection lists; (12) shipping lists; and (13) studies, surveys, and workshops. Following several preliminary materials (i.e., materials that relate to the collection as a whole or to several states) and regional materials, the documents are arranged alphabetically by state and, within each state, by topic and year of receipt. Materials from the following 39 states are included: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Descriptors: Depository Libraries, Government Publications, Library Administration, Library Collections

Johnson (Lawrence) and Associates, Inc., Washington, DC. (1982). Comparative Licensing Study: Profiles of State Day Care Licensing Requirements. Day Care Centers. Volume 3: Nevada – South Carolina. Revised Edition 1981. Updating the Administration for Children, Youth and Families' 1978 "Comparative Licensing Study," a study was conducted to provide a common framework for assessing state activities in critical child care licensing areas and to record the status of child care licensing as of March 1981 in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The updated, six-volume comparative licensing study improves the format of the original (e.g., gives greater prominence to group size and infant care) and contains detailed information on state laws and regulations dealing with family child care homes, group child care homes, and day care centers. The format consists of the following categories: (1) state licensing of child day care facilities; (2) licensing process and enforcement procedures; (3) administration; (4) group compositions of children; (5) staff qualifications and training requirements; (6) program of activities, including education; (7) health and safety; (8) nutrition and food services; (9) social services; (10) parent participation; (11) infants and toddlers; (12) children with handicapping conditions; (13) school age children; (14) facility requirements; and (15) other state requirements – compliance with other local, state, and regional laws and regulations. Volume 3 profiles requirements of day care centers in Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York State, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, and South Carolina. In some profiles, some categories are not detailed.   [More]  Descriptors: Activities, Certification, Child Caregivers, Comparative Analysis

National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources. (1994). SSI: Statewide Systemic Initiatives in Science, Mathematics, & Engineering. 1994-1995. State Profiles. The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Statewide Systemic Initiatives (SSI) Program is a major effort by NSF to encourage improvements in science, mathematics, and engineering education through comprehensive systemic changes in the educational systems of the states. The SSI Program represents a strategy to strengthen the infrastructure for science and mathematics education through alignment of state policies and resources. This effort requires collaboration of educators at all levels, business and industry, parents, and the community at large. This publication describes the individual state initiatives funded through the SSI Program and focuses on state accomplishments and impact. Each state profile lists contact person information, state background, vision, strategy, accomplishments, and important partners and alliances. Presently, 24 states and Puerto Rico have five-year SSI awards: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia. An appendix lists principal investigators with positions/affiliations in addition to SSI.   [More]  Descriptors: Demonstration Programs, Elementary Secondary Education, Engineering Education, Federal Programs

Seppanen, Patricia; And Others (1995). Matching State Goals to a Model of Outcomes and Indicators for Grade 4. Technical Report 15. A national survey of state-articulated student goals and outcomes led to the analysis of documents from 30 states for correspondence with the outcomes specified for grade 4 in the conceptual model developed by the National Center on Educational Outcomes for Students with Disabilities (NCEO). Overall, the study found moderately high correspondence between state goals and the NCEO model at the domain level, but weak correspondence at the outcome and indicator levels, though this may have been more due to the degree of specificity used by states than a lack of conceptual congruence with the NCEO model. Charts and graphs compare the congruence at the levels of domains, outcomes, and indicators for the following states: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia. Reports of the document analysis done for each of these states are provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Disabilities, Educational Assessment, Educational Objectives

Kintzer, Frederick C. (1995). International Developments in Higher Education: New Perspectives on Nonuniversities, Community College Journal of Research and Practice. Describes higher education structures of nations sponsoring nonuniversity programs, including Russia, Belarus, Germany, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Japan, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand, and Mexico, and compares their programs with American community colleges. Identifies new nonuniversity systems, and recommends techniques to restructure courses required for advanced education degrees. (17 citations) Descriptors: Community Colleges, Comparative Analysis, Comparative Education, Educational Practices

Mills, Gladys H. (1980). State Minimum Competency Testing Programs. Resource Catalog. Final Report. Focusing on state-mandated minimum competency testing programs, this annotated bibliography cites 200 items selected from more than 700. The Resource Catalog is intended for state education policy makers and therefore includes resource and study guides; legislative and board action; conference speeches, reports and proceedings; curriculum guides, journal articles and monographs. The diversity of interests, climates, expectations and results discovered to date are shown. Its listings cover the full range of the history, philosophy and rationales for minimum competency testing; legislation considered and enacted; planning and development of tests and remediation programs; research studied and suggested; and success and failures of minimum competency programs. Item availability is noted. Citations are arranged by title within each state; a separate section lists 50 items arranged by their contributing research organization. A directory of 150 contact persons precedes the separate author and title indexes. States represented are: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming. Descriptors: Competency Based Education, Educational Policy, Elementary Secondary Education, Evaluation

Seppanen, Patricia; And Others (1995). Matching State Goals to a Model of Outcomes and Indicators for Grade 8. Technical Report 16. A national survey of state-articulated student goals and outcomes led to the analysis of documents from 30 states for correspondence with the outcomes specified for grade 8 in the conceptual model developed by the National Center on Educational Outcomes for Students with Disabilities (NCEO). All of the 30 states' goal documents included statements that corresponded to the NCEO outcome domain of Academic and Functional Literacy. Fifty to 75 percent of the states specified goals that corresponded to Presence and Participation, Responsibility and Independence, Contribution and Citizenship, and Personal and Social Adjustment. Few states identified goals matched to Accommodation and Adaptation or to Satisfaction. Correspondence at the outcome and indicator levels also varied, though weak correspondence may have been more due to the degree of specificity used by states than a lack of conceptual congruence with the NCEO model. Charts and graphs compare the congruence at the levels of domains, outcomes, and indicators for the following states: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia. Reports of the document analysis done for each of these states are provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Disabilities, Educational Assessment, Educational Objectives

Simmons, Robert M. (1979). State Minimum Competency Testing: A Survey. Information regarding state minimum competency testing programs was requested from the 50 state departments of education in the United States in the spring of 1979. The following questions were asked: (1) Do you have a testing program? (2) If you do, what tests are being used? (3) Do you have a testing program in the planning stages? (4) Are there publications describing your program? and (5) How can sample copies of your state's tests be acquired? Responses were received from 41 states; the sample tests and supporting materials which were contributed have been placed in the Curriculum Library, Clement C. Maxwell Library, Bridgewater State College, Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Twenty states reported existing competency testing programs, and 15 reported programs in the planning stage. (Eight pages of this document provide one-paragraph summaries of the testing programs and policies in the following states: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming.)   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Standards, Elementary Secondary Education, Graduation Requirements, Minimum Competency Testing

Education Law Association, Dayton, OH. (2001). A Legal Odyssey, 2001. Papers [of the] Education Law Association Conference (47th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 15-17, 2001). Topic Outlines. This document is a collection of 53 topic outlines and conference papers whose topics cover a multitude of aspects of educational law. Subjects include the impacts of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) on "normal" students, rights of nontenured teachers, sexual discrimination and harassment, school disciplinary issues, technology and the law, alcohol and drug issues, investigation without litigation, the affects of off-duty conduct on employment actions, corporal punishment, legal issues in teacher accountability, religion and the schools, collective bargaining and retirement, drug-testing policies, educational equality, charter and voucher schools, school administrator education in school law, school desegregation and barriers to integration, changes and trends in methodologies of teaching school law, violence and school-security issues, issues surrounding the superintendent's contract, alien and homeless student education issues, juvenile offenders and residential placement issues, funding-equity issues, compensatory educational services, dress codes, governance over school curriculum, issues involving teacher tenure, gifted student issues, functional behavior assessment, school personnel and student confidentiality issues, interdisciplinary collaboration between administration and law students, and sentencing youth as adults. Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education, Professional Development, School Law

Seppanen, Patricia; And Others (1995). Matching State Goals to a Model of Outcomes and Indicators for Age 6. Technical Report 14. A national survey of state-articulated student goals and outcomes led to the analysis of documents from 25 states (including the District of Columbia) for correspondence with the outcomes specified for age 6 in the conceptual model developed by the National Center on Educational Outcomes for Students with Disabilities (NCEO). Of the 36 survey respondents, 25 states submitted documents addressing learner goals, objectives, or standards for the age 6 level. Overall, the study found a fairly high correspondence at the NCEO domain level, high to moderate correspondence at the outcome level, and moderate to weak correspondence at the indicator level, though this may have been more due to the degree of specificity used by states than a lack of conceptual congruence with the NCEO model.  Charts and graphs compare the congruence at the levels of domains, outcomes, and indicators for the following states: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. Reports of the document analysis done for each of these states are provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Disabilities, Educational Assessment, Educational Objectives

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Migrant Education Programs. (1998). Office of Migrant Education: Program and Grant Information. This document describes programs available through the Office of Migrant Education for migratory children from preschool through grade 12 or up to age 22. The Migrant Education Program supports high-quality and comprehensive educational programs for migratory children to address disruptions in schooling. Funds, which are allocated to states on the basis of a formula, are used to ensure appropriate educational services and opportunity to meet state content and performance standards; to design programs to overcome academic, cultural, and language barriers, social isolation, health problems, and other factors that hinder academic achievement; to prepare children for a successful postsecondary education or employment transition; and to ensure that migratory children benefit from state and local systemic reforms. The High School Equivalency Program (HEP) and College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) are briefly described. The basic state formula grant process is explained. Twelve Even Start Project summaries are included from Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, Michigan, North Carolina, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Texas. Winners of migrant education technology grants are discussed, with telephone and fax contact information for the six grantees. The final section describes the following migrant programs: Migrant Education Consortium for Higher Achievement (MECHA) and its lead partners in the Dade County Public School System and Barry University (Florida); Project ESTRELLA (Encourage Students Through Technology to Reach High Expectations in Learning, Lifeskills, and Achievement) in Illinois, Montana, New York, and Texas; Project Synergy in Florida, Michigan, Puerto Rico, and Texas; Oregon's statewide Telesecundaria program linked to Mexico; Kentucky's pilot community distance-learning project; and Florida's Anchor School Project, in cooperation with North and South Carolina. Contact lists of HEP project coordinators in 14 states and CAMP coordinators in 5 states are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Delivery Systems, Distance Education, Elementary Secondary Education, Family Literacy

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