Bibliography: New Mexico (page 143 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Lynne Marie Getz, William G. Murrell, Maria Fuentes, F. Robert Knox, CLARK S. KNOWLTON, Philip N. Henry, William H. Matchett, Jean MacDonell, Robert Knight Barney, and Paul Shelford.

Shelford, Paul, Jr. (1976). A Career Implementation Program for a Small Rural School: Penasco, New Mexico. Final Report. Included in this final report of the K-14 three-year Penasco, New Mexico, career education project are presentation of the project's goals and objectives, description of general design and implementation procedures, lists of results and accomplishments, the third-party evaluation report, and conclusions and recommendations. General objectives listed are (1) to increase the self-awareness of each student and to stimulate favorable attitudes about the personal, social, and economic significance of work that will help develop skills to choose an appropriate career; (2) to make elementary students aware of the broad range of options open to them in the world of work; (3) to provide career orientation and exploratory experience for junior high school students; (4) to provide job preparation in a wide variety of occupations to students in grades 10-14, with special emphasis on work experience and cooperative educational opportunities for all students; and (5) to ensure placement of all students in either a job, postsecondary occupational training, or college. Conclusions cited in the evaluation report are that in the areas of development of favorable attitudes toward formal education, clear cut evidence of objective attainment is lacking, but that in the areas of developing appropriate decision-making skills and appropriate job skills the program was found clearly successful. Also noted is 100% participation of teachers in infusing career education into the regular curriculum following a change during the project from negative to positive teacher attitudes toward career education. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Career Awareness, Career Development, Career Education

Horn, Calvin (1981). The University in Turmoil and Transition. Crisis Decades at the University of New Mexico. A regent's view of both the dramatic events and daily operations of the University of New Mexico (UNM) from 1960 to 1981 is presented. Following a background chapter that discusses the basic theme of the book and President Popejoy's term of office at UNM, Part Two, "Student Strike," examines: President Heady's immediate trials as president of UNM, the protests of the sixties, the strike, the National Guard, and finally, the philosophy of UNM regarding students. Part Three, "Legislature," discusses the legislature's investigation of academic freedom, legislative funding, and the difficulties experienced by the School of Medicine. The fourth part, "Faculty," discusses a faculty member's insult to the president of UNM, tenure and the controversies surrounding it, and sabbaticals and leaves-without-pay. Part Five, "Administration," examines who runs the university, the turmoil of the president, and selecting a new president. The final section, "Regents," discusses faculty vs. regents, the regents and the community, establishing missions and goals, difficulties experienced with a scandal in the athletic department, and the general role of the regent. A list of illustrations, an index, and notes are provided. Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Activism, Administrator Selection, Athletes

Helbock, Richard W. (1974). The Evolution of a Tri-Cultural Pattern of Settlements in Hispano New Mexico. The first settlements in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, were the 14th century Tewa Indian Pueblos, autonomous socio-economic units based on agriculture. Similar Hispano villages were founded by colonists beginning in the late 16th century and continuing to the early 19th century, when the Chama Valley was used increasingly as a trade route. After the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Anglo settlers (cattlemen, railroad employees, miners) arrived in the area and completed the tri-cultural makeup of the county. Each culture contributed to the county's ideas of political, social, and economic community linkages. During the early 20th century, the traditional Indian and Hispanic village pattern began to evolve into a settlement hierarchy; Chama and Espanola evolved as the county's dominant towns. Although the towns were new, they were both associated with the railroad which guaranteed a trade advantage. The shift to highway transportation helped establish Espanola as the county's leading trade center and largest town. Like Chama and Dulce, somewhat smaller communities, Espanola was originated by Anglo settlers in the late 19th century. Completing the settlement hierarchy are the Indian and Hispanic villages which have remained very small and provide few community services besides elementary schooling. Descriptors: American Culture, American Indian Culture, American Indians, Anglo Americans

Murrell, William G. (1979). A Study of Multi-Cultural Alternatives to Drug Abuse in New Mexico. Five minority alternative drug abuse prevention programs (three Indian and two Hispanic) in New Mexico were evaluated to determine which elements were successful or unsuccessful in addressing the needs of Indian and Hispanic youth regarding the relationship of substance use and abuse, cultural differences, and self-concept. The programs were evaluated on the basis of program description, staff-client action/interaction, community support, and criteria of success. Data indicated: (1) ability to communicate meaningfully with ethnic participants in alternative prevention activities may depend upon the prevention staff's ability to understand the mental and physical circumstances specific to their ethnic target population, which contribute to dependencies on chemical substances; (2) funding should be solicited from federal, state, and local levels, with emphasis on local funding to insure program longevity free of federal/state funding reductions; (3) a needs assessment of the community in which the program will operate is essential; (4) goals and objectives should reflect community and specific target populations; (5) documentation of program activities is vitally important for program accountability; (6) community awareness and support are fundamental to a meaningful drug prevention program; and (7) program success will depend on the program's ability to meet community needs. Descriptors: American Indians, Community Support, Counseling, Counselor Client Relationship

Barney, Robert Knight (1975). Cowboys and Indians: College Football on the American Frontier — The New Mexico Territory, 1892-1912. Although the first football games were played by Eastern universities in the United States, there was great enthusiasm for the game in the schools of the far West. In the late 1800's football was played in the Territory of New Mexico with contests between "white" universities and government Indian schools. These games contributed to the development of football, introducing strategic elements for the most part devised by the Indians. Though the game as played in the West was to a large extent the same as the East, innovations were brought to it that were characteristically western in nature. The rough individualism of western society brought color and excitement to the game. Though similar to the English game rugby, football developed its own rules. Eventually the extreme roughness of the game threatened its existence. In the face of this threat the National Collegiate Athletic Association was organized and laid down new rules controlling the brutality of football and forming it into a game emphasising skills and strategic play.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Athletes, Athletic Coaches, Athletics

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Div. of Indian Education. (1971). New Mexico State Department of Education, Division of Indian Education. 1970-71 Annual Report. An annual report (1970-71) of New Mexico's State Department of Education, Division of Indian Education, this document presents data pertaining to the 20 schools receiving Johnson-O'Malley benefits. Observations from the Director of Indian Education indicate that kindergarten units were expanded to 41 units in 12 districts; that 10 Indian community-school liaison persons were employed to aid community-school communications; that 52 teaching specialists and 36 instructional aides were provided to help promote individualized instruction; that 16 counselors and 11 registered nurses worked full time with the Indian students; and that Indian absenteeism and dropouts have decreased slightly. Included along with these observations are (1) a list of superintendents of Johnson-O'Malley schools; (2) an annual report on public school contracts; (3) school district narratives; (4) tables on Johnson-O'Malley Indian enrollment by schools and months, Johnson-O'Malley Indian average daily attendance by schools and months and by grades and months, and enrollment and average daily attendance of Johnson-O'Malley Indian students; and (5) State and District Summary Reports on enrollment, graduates, and dropouts.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Annual Reports, Average Daily Attendance, Communications

KNOWLTON, CLARK S. (1962). PATRON-PEON PATTERN AMONG THE SPANISH AMERICANS OF NEW MEXICO. THE PATRON-PEON SYSTEM WAS ONE OF THE FIRST SPANISH AMERICAN SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS TO SUCCUMB TO INFLUENCES OF THE DOMINANT ENGLISH-SPEAKING SOCIETY. THE PATRON IS DEFINED AS A PERSON WHO IS ABLE TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC SECURITY, AND LEADERSHIP TO THOSE WHO MUST WORK FOR A LIVING. THE LARGE LANDHOLDER PATRON SUPPLIED A PROTECTED, SELF-SUFFICIENT VILLAGE, SUPPORTED THE CHURCH, AND PROVIDED THE NECESSITIES OF LIFE FOR HIS PEONS. IN EXCHANGE, HE EXPECTED OBEDIENCE AND LOYALTY. THE VILLAGE PATRON DID NOT PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, BUT WAS RESPECTED AS A VILLAGE LEADER. BOTH THE VILLAGE PATRON AND THE LANDHOLDER PATRON WERE EXPECTED TO BE GENEROUS, HOSPITABLE, BRAVE, COURAGEOUS, AND TO DISPLAY THE PERSONAL QUALITIES OF LEADERSHIP. ALTHOUGH THE PATRON-PEON RELATIONSHIP IS ALMOST NON-EXISTENT TODAY, THE FOLLOWING VALUES AND ATTITUDES ARE OUTGROWTHS OF THE RELATIONSHIP AND ARE SEEN AS CHARACTERISTIC OF SPANISH AMERICANS IN NEW MEXICO–(1) A BLIND LOYALTY TOWARD ETHNIC LEADERS, (2) A TENDENCY TO ENTER INTO A SECURE POLITICAL OR ECONOMIC POSITION OF DEPENDENCY, (3) A RELUCTANCE AMONG MANY TO MAKE DECISIONS, (4) A DISLIKE OF COMPETITION AND OF PERSONAL INITIATIVE, (5) A PREFERENCE FOR A STABLE HIERARCHICAL SOCIAL SYSTEM WITH WELL-DEFINED STRATA, ROLES AND UTILIZATIONS, (6) A PREFERENCE FOR FRIENDLY RELATIONSHIPS RATHER THAN IMPERSONAL, AND (7) A STRONG DISLIKE FOR SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGES. THIS PAPER WAS FIRST PUBLISHED IN "SOCIAL FORCES," VOLUME 41, NUMBER 1, OCTOBER 1962. Descriptors: Acculturation, Cultural Differences, Decision Making Skills, Disadvantaged

Sandoval, Lester (1978). Analysis of Post Secondary Educational Pursuits of the Jicarilla Apaches of New Mexico. A study investigated variables related to the success or failure of New Mexico Jicarilla Apaches in their pursuit of post-secondary education, including adequacy of high school experiences as preparation for post-secondary education. Subjects (54 males, 67 females) responded to a questionnaire using items from two instruments previously developed for follow-up studies of American Indian high school graduates. Data indicated that Jicarillas were less assimilated into the dominant culture than were other tribes, as they retained use of the Apache language and life style and had a greater degree of Indian blood. The most important factor in the withdrawal of Jicarillas from post-secondary education was the lack of adequate high school preparation; math and science were the most difficult high school subjects for both college attenders and non-attenders. Respondents felt high school counselors had not provided adequate information about post-secondary education, parents and teachers provided most encouragement in choosing a college major, and tribal scholarships were the most important source of financial aid. Recommendations called for evaluation of Jicarilla high school curriculum, better career counseling, upgraded job skills for reservation employees, use of Jicarilla college graduates to adapt the schools to Jicarilla students' needs, and selection of scholarship committee members knowledgeable about post-secondary education. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indian Education, Career Counseling, College Attendance

Fuentes, Maria (1994). Special Education Teacher Attrition in a New Mexico Public School District: A Report to the Superintendent. This project surveyed special education teachers who were employed in the Gadsden Independent School District, Anthony, New Mexico, during the 1992-93 academic year to identify attitudinal differences between special education teachers (N=8) who departed the district the following year and those (N=32) who remained in the district. A survey instrument was developed for the study. Teachers who departed tended to express more favorable opinions of principal support, school environment, student preparation, and student behavior. Teachers who departed tended to be first and second year teachers, and some were employed on special education provisional licenses. Teachers who remained in the district provided more favorable responses related to student contact, the ability of students to speak English, student cooperativeness, and student attendance. Overall, departure of special education teachers tended to be related to several factors: (1) the desire to relocate; (2) less than 5 years of teaching experience in the position being vacated; and (3) teaching under waivers in the position being vacated. The researcher's personal reactions to the research process are also provided as are reactions of administrators to survey results.   [More]  Descriptors: Disabilities, Elementary Secondary Education, Faculty Mobility, Special Education Teachers

Henry, Philip N. (1981). A Survey of Counseling Centers at Public Community Colleges in New Mexico, Nevada, and Arizona. A study of the counseling centers of public community colleges in the Southwest was conducted to determine the characteristics and duties of counseling personnel, the types of services provided, and counselors' perceptions of students' most prevalent concerns. All community colleges in Arizona (N=15) and Nevada (N=4) and six institutions in New Mexico were selected for the study; 18 colleges responded to the study survey. The survey revealed that: (1) the counseling centers employed a total of 103 professional personnel, of whom 10% held doctoral degrees, 6.7% were part-time employees, and 55% were males; (2) overall, counselor staff spent 64% of their time counseling, 13.6% teaching, 3.4% in workshop activities, and 15.6% in administrative duties; (3) all respondents indicated they offered academic, vocational, and transfer counseling, and all but one offered personal counseling; (4) academic concerns were perceived to be students' most prevalent concerns, followed by vocational problems, the tendency to drop out, interpersonal concerns, and financial worries; (5) no pattern was evidenced in tactics used to acquaint students with available services; (6) only five respondents engaged in client follow-up; and (7) career planning, academic counseling, and counseling of disadvantaged and mature students emerged as the three areas recommended for prospective community college counselors to study. Descriptors: Community Colleges, Counseling Services, Counselor Characteristics, Counselor Training

Getz, Lynne Marie (1997). Schools of Their Own: The Education of Hispanos in New Mexico, 1850-1940. This book highlights episodes in the history of Hispano education in New Mexico, from early territorial days through the New Deal. The 90 years from 1850 to 1940 demonstrate the persistence of the notion that culture can be determined from above, and that schools are a viable tool for determining culture. The myth that Hispanos did not value education came about not because Hispanos actively resisted schools in the territorial period–they did not–but because the schools they struggled to build and staff did not acculturate them to American standards. The administrative centralizers in the 1910s and 1920s thought they could Americanize Hispanos through a bureaucratic apparatus that would enforce standard courses of study and teacher certification. The resulting central bureaucracy proved inadequate to counter local initiative and control. During the 1930s, New Deal cultural imperatives temporarily preoccupied the Hispano community and did some good in preserving past traditions, but they did not alter Hispanos' own self-directed cultural development for the future. Two chapters cover the contributions of George I. Sanchez, an educational psychologist who conducted a major study of the age-grade status of New Mexican schoolchildren and who publicized the poor schooling conditions provided to Hispanos, and Loyd S. Tireman, a progressive educator who founded experimental bilingual schools, but whose emphasis on vocational education exemplified the contradictions inherent in progressive education for Spanish-speaking children. Contains references in notes and an extensive bibliography. Descriptors: Acculturation, Bilingual Education, Community Control, Community Schools

Carnoy, Martin; MacDonell, Jean (1989). School District Restructuring in Sante Fe, New Mexico. CPRE Research Report Series RR-017. The administration of the Santa Fe, New Mexico, School District is gradually moving toward school-based management. The document describes how these changes occurred and what impact they have on the way teachers deliver education. This paper draws from interviews of Santa Fe personnel conducted in April 1987 and March 1988. The information was updated in the spring of 1989. The analysis shows that school-based management in Santa Fe has meant reducing significantly the number of district office administrators and changing the nature of teacher-principal roles. There is support for such change among teachers and parents. Teacher innovation seems to produce an atmosphere of excitement about learning and may increase the effectiveness of educational resources in producing learning.  But there is also resistance, not only because of existing hierarchies but because school-based management requires voluntary time from teachers and principals on top of already heavy demands. If, in addition, the restructuring begins shifting educational resources to at-risk pupils, the more vocal, higher-income parents may push to alter the nature and spirit of such change.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Change, Elementary Secondary Education, Principals, School Based Management

Strong, Kathryn Ringhand (1986). Mountain Roads, Lonely Mesas: A Career Program for Northern New Mexico. Educational outreach programs of Los Alamos National Laboratory assist rural educators in strengthening science curricula; encourage students to take science, math, and English courses; and create a good neighbor policy between the laboratory and rural communities/schools in predominantly Hispanic/American Indian northern New Mexico. The program, initiated in 1981, boosts technical competency of rural students to fulfill the laboratory's employment needs and helps regional economy. Laboratory scientific, technical, and support personnel conduct six types of outreach programs. Science Beginnings for grades 4-6 introduces science-related subjects to stimulate imagination. Programs for high school juniors/seniors include credit courses on state-of-the-art technology, summer programs during which students develop/present science projects with a laboratory mentor, and annual open house for students to talk with scientists about careers and research. A summer institute for secondary school science teachers offers graduate credit. Careers in Science uses panel presentations in regional schools to encourage students in grades 7-10 to consider scientific/technical careers. Panels include people with ethnic backgrounds similar to the target community, males, and females representing jobs which require a variety of educational levels. Background information about the laboratory and region, comments of panel members and teachers, and results of a program evaluation are included.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Education, Business Responsibility, Career Awareness, Career Choice

Matchett, William H. (1988). A Study of Attrition among Graduate Students at New Mexico State University. Attrition for various demographic groups in the several major disciplinary areas represented by graduate students enrolled at New Mexico State University during the fall semesters of the years 1979, 1980, and 1981 are presented. Questions addressed include: overall rate of attrition; significant variance among students from year to year; sex ratio in attrition; which disciplines are more prone to attrition; attrition rates of ethnic minorities as compared to Anglos; length of time to complete graduate programs; and rate of conferral of degrees upon large groups of students. Variables included sex, ethnicity, degree expected, class, major, and cumulative grade-point average. Among the 12 findings are the following: (1) overall attrition is 30%, with no gender bias but a clear effect related to ethnicity; (2) engineering disciplines have a higher rate; (3) agricultural disciplines have the lowest levels of attrition; (4) students in physical sciences are primarily Anglo and foreign; (5) the mean, median, and modal times students required to complete a master's program were 25.7, 22, and 20 months, respectively. Descriptors: Academic Failure, Academic Persistence, College Attendance, Dropout Rate

Knox, F. Robert (1977). Report on Battered Women and Children Conference (Shiprock, New Mexico, May 5 and 6, 1977). Representatives of 47 federal, state, local, and tribal agencies and about 280 participants attended the May 4-5, 1977, series of presentations and workshops co-sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women. Designed to acquaint residents of the San Juan Basin with social service workers, the conference attempted to clarify needs, problems, and concerns of domestic violence victims, attempted to formulate recommendations aimed at developing responsive services, and coordinate existing resources for such victims. Speakers addressed child neglect and abuse, and woman abuse, which follow similar patterns of self-perpetuation. It was felt that few agencies at any level are equipped to handle woman abuse, and that key problem areas in which change is necessary are research, social policy, emergency services, and the criminal justice system. Workshop participants formulated detailed recommendations for prevention services, emergency and social services, the criminal justice system, and tribal needs. Participants agreed that in the San Juan Basin, there is considerable interest in and support for an organized, systematic, and effective response to problems of domestic violence; residents are looking to their leaders and officials for aid and support in this area because, untreated, domestic violence can only spread.   [More]  Descriptors: Agency Role, American Indians, Battered Women, Child Abuse

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