Bibliography: New Mexico (page 144 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Romeo Raymond Di Benedetto, Richard F. Tonigan, Theodore S. Jojola, Everett D. Edington, Sven F. Winther, Herman Agoyo, Letha Rowland Young, I. V. Payne, Albuquerque. New Mexico Univ, and J.K. SOUTHARD.

Tonigan, Richard F. (1984). Population Estimates and Projections of New Mexico's Developmentally Disabled for the Years 1980-2000. The report examines trends in New Mexico's population and projects population changes from 1980 through 2000 and resultant changes in the prevalence of developmental disabilities. Estimated projections are by sex, age, and country. Cumulative projected frequencies obtained per age and sex category by 5-year intervals were then multiplied by age-specific prevalence rates. Findings revealed that the rate of state population growth was projected to decrease from 28.1% (1970-80) to 26% (1980-1990) and to 18% (1990-2000). Projection estimates of the developmental disability population are presented and analyzed in relation to the total state population and to itself. Estimates suggest that over the next 16 years the developmental disability population will begin a distinct change in age composition, namely a percentage decrease in the 0-4 and 5-19 age group and a percentage increase among 20-year-old-plus groups. Data are summarized for each of the state's seven health districts, only one of which is expected to exceed the state's overall rate of population growth over the next 16 years. Descriptors: Age Differences, Demography, Developmental Disabilities, Elementary Secondary Education

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. (1980). Proceedings of the National Conference on American Indian Community Education (1st, Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 23-25, 1979). Representatives of Indian tribes from across the nation attended an April, 1979, Center for American Indian Community Education Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to attempt to define community education in an American Indian context. The conference was organized around a modified Delphi Process and all attendees were urged to participate. Participants produced a large body of data and ideas in six forums concerning Indian Community Education (ICE), resources, activities, school and community roles, manpower training needs, and implementing ICE. Among other things participants felt that: important ICE resources included the community itself and the schools; a basic premise of success is essential to ICE; recreation is a significant part of the educational process; and the school must be an integral part of the community for which it develops resources. The conference held implications for the future, including the need for greater awareness of Indian needs on the part of funding sources; program development and implementation; higher federal funding priority for ICE programs; and expanded use of school facilities. Results of a needs assessment questionnaire completed by participants indicated that on-the-job training, alternative education programs, basic English language skills, funding knowledge and recreational activities were foremost concerns. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Community Education, Community Resources

Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Compensatory Education. (1972). Title I ESEA Case Study: The Bilingual Program, Tucumcari, New Mexico. More than three-fourths of the Nation's school districts receive funds for improving opportunities for educationally deprived children in low-income areas under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Act. The Division of Compensatory Education, which administers Title I in the U.S. Office of Education, has examined a number of successful projects. These projects can be used as examples for other school districts implementing similar programs. The case studies of these examinations comprise a series which describes what is being done in specific locales and where and in what ways the Title I mission is being accomplished. In this report, the Bilingual Program at Tucumcari, New Mexico, which has been in effect since September 1969, is examined. The program attempts to improve the educational opportunity and the overall school experience for 162 educationally deprived children by developing both Spanish and English literacy skills, providing bilingual instruction in social studies and cultural enrichment, and developing positive self-image and cultural identity. The program is examined for planning, management, and implementation. The detailed budget for fiscal year 1972 and various components of the testing program completed by fall 1970 and their results are also given.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Community Involvement, Curriculum Development, English (Second Language)

Young, Letha Rowland (1972). Final Evaluation Report of Southeastern New Mexico Bilingual Program. FY 1971-72. The Southeastern New Mexico Bilingual Program for 1971-72 was evaluated in this report. The academic growth in both English and Spanish and the self-image of 20 bilingual children randomly chosen from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades were compared to 20 students in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades in the standard program. Groups were matched by chronological and mental age, IQ, family income, family situation, number of children in family, parents' education and occupation, and home language. The evaluation instruments were the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test in both English and Spanish; the Stanford Achievement Test; the Goodenough Draw-A-Man Test; the Self-Image Test; the Otis-Lennon Mental Ability; and the California Test of Basic Skills. Findings showed that the bilingual group fell lower in achievement than the control group; the bilingual program began to show improvement more in the higher grades; and the bilingual group did not lose any of its self-image during any one year although it did drop from the close of one grade to the close of another, whereas the control group lost during each year.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Age, Bilingual Education, English (Second Language)

KNOWLTON, CLARK S. (1965). CHANGES IN THE STRUCTURE AND ROLES OF SPANISH-AMERICAN FAMILIES OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO. DATA FOR THIS PAPER WERE OBTAINED FROM EXAMINATION OF AVAILABLE LITERATURE AND FROM FIELD WORK IN SAN MIGUEL AND MORA COUNTIES OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO. THE EXTENDED PATRIARCHAL FAMILY WAS THE PRIMARY SOCIAL SYSTEM AMONG THE SPANISH AMERICANS, OFTEN CONSISTING OF MEMBERS OF THREE OR FOUR GENERATIONS HEADED BY THE GRANDFATHER. THIS FAMILY COOPERATED AS A SINGLE, TIGHTLY KNIT, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, AND SOCIAL UNIT. DOMINANCE AND AUTHORITY WERE RELATED TO SEX AND AGE -THE MALES WERE DOMINANT OVER FEMALES AND THE OLDER MEMBERS HAD AUTHORITY OVER THE YOUNGER FAMILY MEMBERS. THE PRESSURES OF URBANIZATION, INDUSTRIALIZATION, AND LAND LOSSES HAVE BROKEN THIS TRADITIONAL FAMILY PATTERN IN ALL BUT THE MOST REMOTE VILLAGES. THE ADJUSTMENT OF THE LOWER-CLASS SPANISH AMERICAN FAMILY TO URBAN LIVING DEPENDS UPON THE HUSBAND'S SALARY. IF IT IS NOT ADEQUATE, THE WIFE MUST SEEK EMPLOYMENT, THUS STRENGTHENING HER ROLE AND DIMINISHING THE HUSBAND'S ROLE. THE MORE EDUCATED AND ACCULTURATED SPANISH AMERICAN FAMILIES TEND TO EMULATE THE NUCLEAR FAMILY MODEL OF THE ANGLO AMERICAN.   [More]  Descriptors: Agriculture, Economic Factors, Economic Status, Family Attitudes

Kingsbury, Ramona Lee Bent (1974). The Effects of the Las Cruces, New Mexico, Bilingual Program on Selected Aspects of English. The study ascertained through standardized tests, if a bilingual educational program had an effect on spoken English proficiency of native Spanish speakers in Las Cruces, New Mexico. The sample consisted of 34 fourth grade children enrolled in the Sustained Primary Program for Bilingual Students in the Las Cruces Public School System. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: group I was taught in both English and Spanish; group II was taught in English only. Taken from the same cultural and socioeconomic background, subjects were tested in a quiet room. The methods used to measure English speaking proficiency were the Ammons Quick Picture Vocabulary Test; 3 subtests of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Ability taken from the representational level (Auditory Reception, Auditory Association, and Verbal Expression); and a nonverbal intelligence test (the Columbia Mental Maturity Scale). Mean scores were computed for all tests and groups were compared. To determine the significance of difference between scores, t tests were conducted on all tests. Findings were: (1) no significant differences were found between the 2 groups on English speaking proficiency in auditory reception, auditory association, verbal expression, and on the intelligence test; and (2) significant differences were found on the Ammons Quick Picture Vocabulary Test. English speaking proficiency was depressed for both groups when compared with norms for their chronological age.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, English (Second Language), Language Fluency, Language Proficiency

Leonard, Olen; Loomis, C. P. (1941). Culture of a Contemporary Rural Community: El Cerrito, New Mexico. Rural Life Studies: 1, November 1941. Located on the Pecos River in San Miguel County, El Cerrito (New Mexico) was a culturally stable rural community. Almost a cultural island, its inhabitants were of native or Spanish American stock, descendants of conquistadores who mixed their blood with that of the indigenous population. Religion and the Catholic church had a profound influence on the people. This was shown in their thinking, attitudes and values, and day-to-day activities. The family had a strong influence on the community. When the village was first settled, it was completely surrounded by enough grass land to support sheep and cattle to afford the people an independent livelihood. The community was almost a complete and independent socioeconomic unit, depending on the outside world for a market for its wool and to supply certain material items not produced or made at home. However, over the last quarter-century, El Cerrito had suffered severely due to loss of a large portion of the land which supported it. Loss of local resources failed to disturb the village or its people while outside employment offered a substantial wage. It was only after this resource also gave way that continued existence of the old way of life was threatened. Its preference for cultural isolation and its lack of technological knowledge did not allow El Cerrito to meet the competition of other producing areas.   [More]  Descriptors: Adjustment (to Environment), Community Characteristics, Community Study, Cultural Context

KNOWLTON, CLARK S. (1964). AN APPROACH TO THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO. NORTHERN NEW MEXICO IS DEFINED TO INCLUDE THOSE NORTHERN COUNTIES DOMINATED BY RURAL, SPANISH-AMERICAN CULTURE, GEOGRAPHIC FEATURES AND HISTORICAL ANTECEDENTS ARE DESCRIBED. THE STUDY PRESENTS DATA ON PRESENT ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL CONDITIONS, OBSERVATIONS AS TO CAUSES OF THESE CONDITIONS, INCLUDING REASONS FOR UNSUCCESSFUL GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE PROGRAMS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT OF CONDITIONS. IT DISCUSSES STATE AND LOCAL PER CAPITA INCOME, DEPENDENCE OF THE AREA ON WELFARE, DIFFERENCE IN CULTURAL VALUES, HISTORIC CULTURE CONFLICTS, AND TRANSITION OF THE PEOPLE FROM AN ECONOMY DEPENDENT ON SELF-CONTAINED VILLAGES TO LOSS OF THEIR LAND HOLDINGS, FORCING AGRICULTURAL MIGRANCY UPON THEM. REASONS CITED FOR FAILURE OF GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE PROGRAMS IN THE AREA WERE CULTURE CONFLICTS, RIGIDITY OF PROGRAMS, AND FAILURE OF PROGRAMS TO MEET BASIC NEEDS OF THE AREA. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT INCLUDE FLEXIBLE, COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO THE CONDITIONS OF THIS REGION, UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN CULTURES, DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF NATURAL AND RECREATION RESOURCES, IMPROVEMENTS IN LAND USE AND AGRICULTURAL TECHNIQUES, MARKETING-COOPERATIVE FORMATION, EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT, AND SMALL INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Cultural Traits, Culture, Culture Conflict

Payne, I. V. (1973). Southeastern New Mexico Bilingual Program. Program Accomplishment Audit, 1972-73. The purpose of the audit report on the Southeastern New Mexico Bilingual Program (1972-73) of the Artesia School District is to give a critique of the project's evaluation with notations on comparative findings of the project evaluation and the audit, and to confirm or question the program modifications proposed in the evaluation. The 5 audit report sections are: (1) introductory and general comments on the project evaluation quality and comparative findings of the project evaluation and the audit; (2) detailed critique of the comprehensive evaluation for each component, based on an assessment of the instruments used, data collection, and data analysis techniques, and presentation; (3) description of the auditor's on-site findings and correlation with the evaluator's data and reports on a component by component basis, and a summary of consistencies and discrepancies; (4) general recommendations for evaluation design revisions with a rationale for each; and (5) confirmation or questioning of the need for program modifications proposed in the project evaluation.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Comparative Analysis, Educational Improvement, Evaluation Criteria

Jojola, Theodore S.; Agoyo, Herman (1992). One Generation of Self-Determination: Native American Economic Self-Reliance in New Mexico. This paper examines changes in federal policy that have encouraged economic development by American Indian tribes, and presents examples from New Mexico. The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 guaranteed federal provision of education and other services to the tribes, but the newly reorganized tribal governments were regulated almost exclusively by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). In the 1950s, aspects of federal wardship were terminated and Native Americans were relocated to urban areas. In the 1960s, Indian Community Action Programs of the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) allowed tribes to initiate their own reforms, forcing tribal governments to become more structured and to create their own bureaucracies. The OEO also provided training for tribal leaders and established consortia with major universities to provide technical assistance. The 1970s saw the beginning of the self-determination era. Job training for Native Americans was increased, tribes were allowed to contract services from the BIA, and the policy of Indian preference in hiring for Indian programs was strengthened. In the 1980s the Supreme Court ruled in favor of tribes imposing severance taxes on extracted minerals, but sagging world prices for strategic minerals and massive federal cutbacks in programs and services highlighted the boom-and-bust nature of tribal economics. Major program areas administered by Pueblo tribal consortia are listed, and barriers to tribal economic self-reliance are outlined.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Community Development, Economic Change

SOUTHARD, J.K. (1967). A SURVEY OF SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN FROM MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL FAMILIES WITHIN DONA ANA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO. THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO LOCATE MIGRANT CHILDREN IN DONA ANA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, IDENTIFY THEIR NEEDS, CATALOG THEIR MOVEMENTS AND CHARACTERISTICS, AND DEFINE THEIR EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS. A MIGRANT CHILD WAS DEFINED AS A PERSON BETWEEN THE AGES OF 5 AND 17, WHOSE PARENTS OR GUARDIANS EARNED THEIR LIVELIHOOD IN SOME TYPE OF AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITY, BUT DID NOT OWN THE AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITY OR PARTICIPATE IN THE EARNINGS OF THE ACTIVITY. THE MIGRANT CHILDREN WERE IDENTIFIED BY SEARCHING THE SCHOOL RECORDS AND ENROLLMENT CARDS, TELEPHONE CALLS, AND ON SITE INTERVIEWS IN THE THREE SCHOOL DISTRICTS OF DONA ANA COUNTY. ABOUT 150 MIGRANT PARENTS WERE INTERVIEWED TO OBTAIN A SAMPLING OF THEIR CONCERNS FOR THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF THEIR CHILDREN. TABLES ARE INCLUDED WHICH SHOW THE NUMBER OF MIGRANT CHILDREN IN EACH DISTRICT, THE NUMBER OF MIGRANTS EARNING LESS AND MORE THAN $3,000 PER YEAR, AND AN AGE BREAKDOWN OF MIGRANTS. SEVERAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC AGENCIES ARE OFFERING ASSISTANCE TO MIGRANTS IN THE COUNTY. RECOMMENDATIONS INCLUDED–(1) PRE-SCHOOL PROGRAMS SHOULD BE EXPANDED, (2) ENGLISH AND SPANISH LANGUAGE PROGRAMS SHOULD BE CONTINUED FOR MIGRANTS, (3) A PRACTICAL VOCATIONAL CORE PROGRAM FOR MIGRANTS, (4) COUNSELING SERVICES SHOULD BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR MIGRANT STUDENTS, AND (5) SOME PROVISIONS SHOULD BE MADE FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL AND NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF MIGRANT YOUNGSTERS.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Laborers, Educational Needs, Migrant Children, Migrant Education

Winther, Sven F.; And Others (1969). The Invisible Student: A Longitudinal Study of the Beginning Freshman Class of 1963 at the University of New Mexico. The 1963 Freshman class at the University of New Mexico was studied through June, 1968, for performance patterns in relation to overall performance, high school grade-point average, male-female, Spanish surnames and non-Spanish surnames. In addition to university furnished data, questionnaires were submitted to a stratified random sample of approximately 25% of the entire class. The final status of the entering class of 1963 as of mid-June 1968 was 46.9% dropouts from University College, 15.2% from degree colleges, 7.8% currently enrolled, and 30.1% graduated. It was found that high school grade-point average was related to length of stay at the University; that males and females performed substantially the same with reference to staying or dropping out of the University; and that overall, the Spanish American group initially did not perform as well and had poorer grade-point average in University College. However, no noteworthy difference was found in grade-point between Spanish Americans and others during later semesters and the dropout rate was lower or about the same for Spanish Americans in every semester after the first. All recommendations indicated a greater need for official contact with students, whether enrolled, withdrawing, or under academic suspension. A copy of the questionnaire appears in the appendix.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, College Students, Comparative Analysis, Dropouts

Cibrario, Dominic J. (1974). The Pueblo Indians of New Mexico: An Analysis of the Educational System. Educational systems (both tribal and formal) of the Pueblo Indians, including Taos, San Juan, Tesuque, Zia, Zuni, and the Bernalillo District in New Mexico, were analyzed. The analysis included discerning whether or not (1) the Pueblos' traditional culture and heritage is being taught and to what extent and (2) bilingual and bicultural studies have been implemented in the elementary and/or secondary schools on the reservations and to what degree. Interviews were conducted at day schools operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the All Tribes Mission School, and schools in the Zuni area. Students, teachers, school personnel, and parents were questioned about tribal and formal education. It was found that so far San Juan has been the only pueblo to introduce bilingual and bicultural studies into the elementary school. The others prefer to keep the tribal and formal educational systems departmentalized with tribal education in the kivas. Even though bilingual and bicultural studies have not been developed at Taos, Tesuque, Zia, and Zuni, Indian aids who speak the language of the pueblo have been hired to reinforce instruction. This paper also discusses the history, language, and educational and population statistics of the Pueblo Indians.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Attitudes, Biculturalism

National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center. (1974). Migrant Programs in the Southwestern States — Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Part of the "Comprehensive National Survey of Migrant Programs" series, this directory was prepared for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the Southwestern states of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The directory lists programs, services, and resources available to migrants in these states. Special emphasis was placed on information and data current as of summer 1974, obtained from Federal, State, and local agencies in the various states. Information is given for each state on: (1) programs; (2) crops and work periods; (3) migrant population and wages by county; (4) labor camps; and (5) supplementary data such as information sources and exhibits which depict county distribution and state relation to the national migratory patterns. The programs listed provide educational, health, legal, and job placement services to these farmworkers. Some of the listings of organizations, programs, or agencies may contain some obsolete information due to their: instability; being subject to change as new needs, priorities, and objectives appear; or as operating funds expire. Given in the appendix are an annotated bibliography of publications from the National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Juarez-Lincoln Center and maps of the national migratory patterns, the Navajo Reservation, relative to surrounding states, and a migratory workers' road map.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Laborers, Directories, Educational Programs, Elementary Secondary Education

Edington, Everett D.; Di Benedetto, Romeo Raymond (1988). Principal Leadership Style and Student Achievement in Small and Rural Schools of New Mexico. Effective leadership appears to be an element of a successful school, but few studies have covered either leadership in small and rural schools or effective schools with the ethnic mix of Anglo, Hispanic, and Native American students. This study's population consisted of the 24 New Mexico rural public elementary schools having an enrollment of 500 or fewer students and a principal who had been at the school for more than one year. Hispanics and Native Americans comprised, on average, 37.1% and 2.3%, respectively, of student enrollments. The principals and eighth grade teachers of each school rated the principals on participation, role clarification, supervision, and charismatic leadership. A multiple stepwise regression analysis tested the effect of principal leadership qualities, student socioeconomic status, and student ethnicity on eighth grade student scores on the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (CTBS). Student socioeconomic status was related to CTBS scores, but ethnicity was not. The teachers' perception of the principal's role clarification was negatively related to CTBS scores, and their perception of his charismatic leadership was positively related. No other teacher ratings or principal self-ratings were significant variables. The paper includes five statistical tables and 18 references. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indians, Educational Research, Grade 8

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