Bibliography: New Mexico (page 145 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include David E. Cox, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Richard Walsh, Washington Congress of the U.S, Arietta Maria, Sonia S. Cowen, Las Cruces. New Mexico State Univ, Jose Jorge Anchondo, Denver Education Commission of the States, and Atilano A. Valencia.

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1992). Consolidating Initiatives for Tomorrow's Education (CITE): A Student Centered Policy Framework for System-Wide Educational Change in New Mexico. This booklet describes New Mexico's Consolidating Initiatives for Tomorrow's Education (CITE), a student-centered policy framework for systemwide educational change. The vision and mission statements stress all students' potential to learn and local control for shared responsibility and leadership. Eight educational goals for lifelong learning and the initiatives to achieve them are described: (1) involve all New Mexicans in a shared responsibility for education; (2) provide opportunities which will enable all students to learn; (3) establish high standards and high expectations to enable students to acquire the personal qualities, values, skills, and knowledge necessary to become productive citizens in a multiethnic democratic society; (4) seek and reward excellence in teachers and other school personnel; (5) advocate for and seek adequate resources to support maximum student learning; (6) organize resources for systemwide change to prepare students for the future; (7) promote, exemplify, and implement decision making at the appropriate level; and (8) assure to the public the integrity of the educational process through program and financial accountability. A visual representation of the CITE policy framework is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Improvement, Educational Objectives, Educational Opportunities, Educational Policy

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Budget. (1983). Science and Math Education. Hearings before the Committee on the Budget. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 7, 1983; Las Cruces, New Mexico, February 11, 1983). Provided are hearings related to perfecting the goals/objectives of S. 248, the Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education Act of 1983. Various issues related to the current crisis in science/mathematics education and to improving the quality of education in these areas in the United States (with particular emphasis on New Mexico) are addressed in testimony presented during the hearings. Among the areas considered are: U.S. education compared with foreign countries; declining enrollments; science and mathematics teacher quality/improvement; regional science resource centers; science/mathematics education for American Indians and for rural school children; financial support (including teacher salaries); incentives for science/mathematics teachers; industry role; teacher-industry relationship; and need for scientific/technologically literate citizens. Supporting documentation, including additional statements, letters, and a newspaper article are included in an appendix. Also included (in the body of the hearings) is a paper entitled "Can Science Education Cope with the Information Onslaught?" which was prepared during a 1981 conference at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indian Education, Declining Enrollment, Educational Improvement

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1979). Toward Future Growth Strategies for New Mexico State University: A White Paper on the Impact of Enrollment Projections. Current policies and programs at New Mexico State University pertaining to a projected decline in enrollment are examined, and possible actions that the university might take to meet the changing needs and profile of the future student population are suggested. It is proposed that additional recruitment efforts should be directed toward new student populations and should be built around opportunities in the current and projected job market. In order to help eliminate financial barriers that might cause students to drop out, mini-scholarships to attract part-time students and tuition waivers to attract out-of-state students might be established. Student motivation and desire to remain in college might be increased by improving the existing honors program and by implementation of the Crimson Scholars Program to attract more academically superior students. A comprehensive, formal study of students who come to the university is recommended because no systematic surveys of freshmen have been conducted. The development of new programs and building flexibility into the older ones is another tactic to prevent enrollment decline. Among the possible alternative delivery systems are the following: extended evening and weekend schedules, independent study, time-shortened and time-lengthened degrees, and expansion of off-campus programs. The coordination of placement and demands of the job market and obtaining support for research are recommended, along with establishing an information center to promote evaluation efforts. Supplementary materials, including a freshman questionnaire, are appended. Descriptors: Change Strategies, College Students, Declining Enrollment, Delivery Systems

New Mexico State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Santa Fe. (1983). Survey of Political Participation, Employment, and Demographic Characteristics of Eleven Counties in Southern New Mexico. Volume II. The report briefly outlines the population characteristics, public employment and political representation status of the Dona Ana, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, Otero, and Sierra counties in southern New Mexico for a 10-year period. The three sections of each profile focus on the city government, largest city in that county, and school district encompassing that municipality. Information in each profile includes: demographic data for 1970 and 1980 describing the composition of the population; its income and poverty status, and changes in population base over a 10-year period; composition of elected state, county, and city officials by race, ethnicity, and sex for the years from 1969 to 1983; county and city governments' work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of 1982; enrollment data for the largest district in the county by race and ethnicity for selected school years from the 1968-69 to the 1983-84 school terms; composition of the district's school board by race, ethnicity, and sex for 1973 to 1983; and the district's work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of the 1982-83 school year. A section describing the geographical scope, data sources, and methodologies used to compile and analyze the data concludes the report. Descriptors: City Government, Economic Factors, Elementary Secondary Education, Enrollment Trends

Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. (1990). Assessment and Accountability in Higher Education. Proceedings Document (Sante Fe, New Mexico, December 5-7, 1989). ECS Working Papers. The conference reported in this document was attended by representatives of seven states (Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington). Participants focused on three key questions: (1) what are the issues and objectives behind assessment in each state? (2) what can be done regarding the implementation of assessment? and (3) how should the results be communicated? Concern with assessment was seen as reflecting interest in educational quality, as encouraging more effective use of resources, and as a means for faculty self-improvement. Variations across states were noted in terms of external forces, internal forces, initial fears and ultimate advantages of assessment as policy, and current issues. Suggestions directed at both campus leadership and state leaders are made for the improvement of assessment implementation especially in the areas of resolving differences between the two groups and maintaining good communication. A concluding section notes that the power of the assessment movement lies in the cogency of the questions it asks and that the biggest shortcoming of many state assessment initiatives is their failure to communicate a compelling set of reasons for mandated assessment. The conference agenda, a list of participants, and names of members of the Assessment Advisory Committee are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Educational Assessment, Educational Improvement, Educational Policy

New Mexico State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Santa Fe. (1983). Survey of Political Participation, Employment and Demographic Characteristics of Eleven Counties in Southern New Mexico. Volume I. The report briefly outlines the population characteristics, public employment and political representation status of the Chaves, Curry, Eddy, Lea, and Roosevelt counties in southern New Mexico for a 10-year period. The three sections of each profile focus on the county government, largest city in that county, and school district encompassing that municipality. Information in each profile includes: demographic data for 1970 and 1980 describing the composition of the population, its income and poverty status, and changes in population base over a 10-period; composition of elected state, county, and city officials by race, ethnicity, and sex for the years from 1969 to 1983; county and city governments' work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of 1982; enrollment data for the largest district in the county by race and ethnicity for selected school years from the 1968-69 to the 1983-84 school terms; composition of the district's school board by race, ethnicity, and sex for 1973 to 1983; and the district's work force by race, ethnicity, sex, and job classification as of the 1982-83 school year. A section describing the geographical scope, data sources, and methodologies used to compile and analyze the data concludes the report. Descriptors: City Government, Economic Factors, Educational Trends, Elementary Secondary Education

Anchondo, Jose Jorge; And Others (1977). Working with Your School. A Handbook of the New Mexico Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. In a sense, public education is like a pyramid of laws, policies, regulations, rules, guidelines, and practices built on a foundation called the U.S. Constitution. At each level, there is a set of "do's and don'ts" that guide the actions of people involved in public education. This handbook, written to help people understand their rights relating to public education, gives information, ideas and suggestions on ways to improve the students' education. Discussed are the education pyramid; legal rights of students and their parents; how to influence school decisions; evaluating the school; New Mexico State education agencies and laws; how and where to file discrimination complaints; major issues in schools–curriculum, personnel, school plant and equipment, parent and student rights, school board and accountability; freedom of speech; searches; suspensions and expulsions; dress codes; corporal punishment; student marriage and pregnancy; student records; ability grouping; the educable mentally retarded; bilingual education; Federal programs and discrimination; free lunch program; Freedom of Information Act; textbooks; teacher certification; education of Native Americans; and local school boards. Also included are sample letters for filing Title VI and IX complaints, for requesting a conference with school personnel, and for requesting permission to speak before the school board; suggestions for dealing with people in the education pyramid; and an evaluation checklist for evaluating a school. Descriptors: Ability Grouping, American Indians, Bilingual Education, Civil Liberties

Cowen, Sonia S. (1995). Update Report: New Mexico State University at Carlsbad. Addendum to the "Report" (Books I-IV). In February 1995, New Mexico State University's two-year branch campus at Carlsbad (NMSU-C) submitted a report to the North Central Association (NCA), responding to a 1992 accreditation visit and consisting of four books: (1) responses to NCA concerns and suggestions; (2) evidence of NMSU-C's fulfillment of NCA accreditation requirements and criteria; (3) appendixes; and (4) a plan for assessing student achievement. This report presents an update to the February report, describing the status of initiatives that have been implemented or are in-progress in preparation for a follow-up focus visit. Following a review of the process used in preparing the original report and the update, a general overview of progress made at the college from 1993 to 1995 is provided. The reports then provide specific updates for six NCA concerns and three suggestions addressed in Book One, evidence of fulfillment of one criteria and updated institutional data forms from Book Two, an updated organizational chart from Book Three, and two updated elements from the assessment plan in Book Four. Appendixes provide an information systems plan; a memo describing procedures for program review at the college, including a review cycle through the year 2000; a sample course description form; orientation materials for nursing faculty; a 1994-95 travel budget by department; minutes from a faculty development task force meeting; college guidelines for hiring faculty; updated NCA institutional data forms for spring 1995; and an updated organizational chart.   [More]  Descriptors: Accreditation (Institutions), Administrative Organization, Advisory Committees, College Planning

Sanchez, Alex A. (1974). A Feasibility Study on the Establishment of a Fire Fighting Academy for the State of New Mexico. The report on the desirability and feasibility of establishing the New Mexico State Fire Academy and firemen training program is presented in three parts: (1) the result of a survey of firemen training, (2) a proposal for a total system of firemen training, and (3) an analysis of the cost of implementing this program of training and education. The survey instrument was a self-analysis questionnaire in which firemen and fire chiefs assessed their own competence in fire fighting in 12 major categories. From this data, the needs for a program were assessed. The proposed program of the new fire fighting academy notes three components: (1) a regular program of intensive basic and advanced firemanship courses, (2) an extensive program of specialized courses and seminars taught both at the academy and at local fire departments, and (3) support programs for local training including curriculum planning and development, development and refinement of media and related support services, instructor training, and student records management. These three responsibilities and cost estimates are discussed and assessed. Tables present the questionnaire data and cost estimates. Appendixes contain resolutions, memorials, tables on the quality of firemen training and skills, and a description of proposed academy facilities.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Facilities, Educational Programs, Feasibility Studies, Financial Needs

Walsh, Richard (1989). Student Academic Services: Academic Affairs and Student Affairs Working Together for Student Development at Eastern New Mexico University. This report discusses the Student Academic Services (SAS) project at Eastern New Mexico University. It looks at how student development efforts have been augmented at the university. SAS is based on student development philosophy, fundamental to which is an understanding that the human individual functions as a unit, and his/her diverse features develop in interaction with one another. Therefore the enhancement of both cognitive and affective development should be considered essential to the missions of postsecondary institutions so that self-determination and self-direction can best result. The needs existing on Eastern's campus underlying the establishment of an inter-divisional student development structure were: to improve the academic skills of students; to bring academic units and student services departments closer together; to improve academic advising; to provide assistance to specific groups of students; and to deal with budget reductions. The purposes and goals of SAS are: to provide personal planning and self-development services to students; to integrate advising, counseling, and academic support services; to provide academic advising to undeclared students; to provide career planning materials; and to provide learning aids, tutoring, and consultation. The SAS Center offers a blend of classrooms, tutoring, practical skills laboratories, computers, people, programs, and services. Contains 6 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Advising, Career Planning, College Students, Counseling Services

Cowen, Sonia S., Ed. (1995). New Mexico State University at Carlsbad Report, Book Two: General Institutional Requirements Criteria–College Progress '92-'95. Prepared as Book Two of a focused evaluation report submitted to the North Central Association (NCA), this document describes the characteristics and activities of New Mexico State University's two-year branch campus at Carlsbad (NMSU-C) that fulfill the NCA's general institutional requirements and five criteria for accreditation. First, descriptions and supporting data are provided showing NMSU-C's fulfillment of 24 general requirements in the areas of mission, authorization, governance, faculty, educational programs, finances, and the public dissemination of information. Next, narratives are presented describing the college's fulfillment of the following five criteria: (1) a clear and publicly stated institutional purpose consistent with the institutional mission and appropriate to an institution of higher education; (2) the effective organization of human, financial, and physical resources; (3) evidence of the accomplishment of the institution's educational and other purposes; (4) evidence that the institution can continue to accomplish its purposes and strengthen its effectiveness; and (5) demonstration of integrity in institutional practices and relationships. Information on institutional progress since a 1992 NCA report is then presented as of 1995, detailing improvements made in the areas of student services, NMSU-C's library and media center, the bookstore, the operations of NMSU-C's Learning Assistance Center, and community service and continuing education programs. Six initiatives to improve academic administration are then reviewed and changes in academic programs since 1992 are highlighted. NCA Basic Institutional Data forms A through G, providing data for 1992-93 to 1994-95, are attached.   [More]  Descriptors: Accreditation (Institutions), College Planning, Community Colleges, Educational Improvement

Garmhausen, Winona (1988). History of Indian Arts Education in Santa Fe: The Institute of American Indian Arts with Historical Background 1890 to 1962. This book traces the history of the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Sections cover four time periods in the evolution of the Institute: the United States Indian Industrial School at Sante Fe, 1890-1932; the Santa Fe Indian School, 1930-62; and the Institute of American Indian Arts, 1962-70 and 1970-78. The United States Indian Industrial School at Santa Fe was opened to University of New Mexico students and to all Indian students in the Southwest in 1890. The school, which was part of the federal boarding school system, sought to provide vocational training that would allow young Indians to manage allotment lands they had received through the Dawes Act. Another purpose of boarding schools was to separate Indians from their families in hopes of breaking tribal ties and hastening acculturation. The Meriam Report of 1928, which evaluated Indian education, found among other deficiencies that the standardized curriculum based on White cultural values was ineffective in educating American Indian students. This report, along with widespread interest in Native American art, opened the door for the introduction of traditional Indian arts in the boarding school curriculum. In 1930 the school changed its name to the Santa Fe Indian School to reflect the school's change in focus. During the next 30 years, the school opened a new arts and crafts building, a painting studio, and initiated other improvements and additions. At the end of this period the arts program was floundering and a new direction was needed, thus in the fall of 1962 the official opening of the Institute of American Indian Arts took place. For the next 19 years, the Institute housed the nation's only all-Indian, all-arts training center. This center, which offered upper secondary and junior college programs, was the first to be controlled and supervised by the federal Indian Arts and Crafts Board, was funded directly by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and was open to all Native Americans. Contains a bibliography and index. Descriptors: Acculturation, American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, American Indians

Cox, David E., Ed.; Walton, Frank C., Ed. (1994). With Agriculture Knowledge and Wisdom (Me Ka Ike Ame Ka Na'auao). Proceedings of the Annual Western Region Agricultural Education Research Meeting (Honolulu, Hawaii, April 13-16, 1994). Volume XIII, Number 1. This proceedings includes the following papers: "Examining Learning Styles of Students in College of Agriculture" (Torres, Cano); "Developing a Scale to Research and Evaluate Youth Leadership Life Skills Development" (Seevers, Dormody, Clason); "Predicting Youth Leadership Life Skills Development among FFA (Future Farmers of America) Members in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico" and "Predicting Youth Leadership Life Skills Development among Senior 4-H Members" (Dormody, Seevers); "Understanding and Perceptions about Agriculture of Television News Reporters" (Terry, Jr.); "Strategies for Improving Agricultural Literacy and Science Process Skills of Urban Fifth and Sixth Graders in Los Angeles Unified School District" (Mabie, Baker); "Agricultural Awareness in Arizona" (Flood, Elliot); "Realistic Expectations of Beginning Secondary Agriculture Education Teachers as Perceived by Beginning Secondary Agriculture Education Teachers and Their Principals in the Western United States" (Mundt et al.); "Assessment of Cognitive Level of Instruction, Aspiration, and Attitude toward Higher Level Instruction" (Whittington, Bowman); "Agri-Science Equal to Science?" (Christian, Key); "Status of Secondary Agricultural Education Computers and Agribusiness Software" (Elliot et al.); "How Videotape Is Used by Teachers of Agricultural Sciences in Secondary Schools" (Daniel, Terry, Jr.); "4-H Youth Participation in Leadership Development Activities" (Seevers, Dormody); "Participation of FFA Members in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico in Leadership Development Activities" (Dormody, Seevers); "Administrative Approaches to Management of Concurrent Enrollment Programs" (Hirpa, Straquadine); "Analysis of the Leadership Styles of Selected FFA Members and Their Advisors" (Washington et al.); "Learning and Teaching Styles of Agricultural and Technology Education Teacher Educators and Preservice Teachers" (Raven et al.); "Comparison of Learning Styles, Teaching Styles and Personality Types of Preservice Student Teachers at Two Western Universities" (Whittington, Raven); "Agricultural Education Preparation Programs in the Western Region" (Cvancara, Nelson); "Comparison of Undergraduate Major and Preservice Teachers' Performance on a Standardized Subject Assessment Exam; and Technical Competence as Perceived by Cooperating Teachers" (Baker, Malle); "Homeowners' Attitudes about the Use of Lawn Chemicals" (Byrum, Elliot); "Enrollment Changes in Idaho Agricultural Sciences and Technology Programs Which Occurred after Program Delivery Changes" (Mundt, Nesbitt); "Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Safety" (Lawver); and "Relationships between Student Safety Attitude and Selected Variables" (Lawver). Critiques follow each paper.   [More]  Descriptors: Agribusiness, Agricultural Education, Beginning Teachers, Cognitive Style

Maria, Arietta (1981). Report on Annual Women's Re-Entry Program Workshop (4th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, July 31, 1981). This report briefly describes presentations made at a re-entry workshop which was sponsored by the New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women. The 45 participants included representatives from post-secondary programs and institutions throughout the state. The purpose of this workshop was to provide information to state institutions and agencies which seek to respond to the needs of displaced homemakers who become re-entry students. In the welcome and opening remarks, the chairperson of the workshop stated that 50% of all women in this country die alone and in poverty. Two factors which affect this dramatic statistic were cited. First, on the average, females continue to earn only 59% of the average male wage. Second, when homemakers lose that position there are no retirement benefits and no income, and they hold skills that are difficult to transfer to the out-of-the-home job market. During this transition from the private sphere of home and family to the public sphere of job and wages the need for assistance is greatly heightened. Workshop presentations were made on the following topics: innovative educational programs; daycare on campus/cooperatives; sex equity issues; re-entry service directory; on-campus re-entry student services; and nonfederal program funding. Descriptors: Day Care, Displaced Homemakers, Educational Innovation, Females

Valencia, Atilano A. (1970). Bilingual/Bicultural Education — An Effective Learning Scheme for First Grade Spanish Speaking, English Speaking, and American Indian Children in New Mexico. A Report of Statistical Findings and Recommendations for the Grants Bilingual Education Project, Grants, New Mexico. The Grants, New Mexico, Bilingual/Bicultural Program reported in this document was designed to introduce into the first-grade curriculum the native language of the child. Ten general objectives of the program are listed, in which the overall objective is introducing or clarifying concepts in a child's Spanish or Indian dialect and then giving emphasis to the child's culture and native language as a means to reinforce a positive attitude toward himself and his cultural heritage. Sections are devoted to (1) description of program, (2) evaluation design, and (3) statistical analyses and findings. Based on the findings, the author recommends continuation of the district's English language program due to its overall effectiveness; continuation of the bilingual education approaches that include elementary grades Spanish language instruction, use of Spanish or tribal dialect for non-English-speaking first grades, and English-as-a-second-language emphasis for children with little or no knowledge of English; testing with a larger sample to establish conclusive findings on the cultural variables measured by the Cultural Sensitivity Instrument; and program continuance due to favorable support by parents.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Educational Programs

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