Bibliography: New Mexico (page 146 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Richard L. Holemon, Santa Fe. Div. of Adult Education. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Gerald M. Goldhaber, Lori Titus, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Commission on Postsecondary Education, MILDRED FITZPATRICK, Harry L. Gradman, Laura Chin, Albuquerque Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), and Sonia S. Cowen.

Titus, Lori (1992). Utilization of CD-ROM Reference Products by Reference Librarians in Public Libraries in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. A survey of the reference departments of public libraries in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah was conducted to determine whether CD-ROM products are being used in routine reference work. Previous literature on CD-ROM had primarily been concerned with the response to and acceptance of the technology by patrons. A stratified sample of public libraries containing at least 50,000 volumes was used to allow comparisons between different size libraries and their use of CD-ROMs. Of the 68 surveys sent out, 57 were returned. Of the libraries replying, 65 percent used CD-ROM products. A slight majority of these libraries, 58.8 percent, indicated that the reference staff used CD-ROMs routinely. However, use by patrons was found to be more important than use by staff when selecting a CD-ROM product. Six tables and two figures present study data. Four appendixes contain the questionnaire, its cover letter, and two lists of CD-ROM products. (Contains 14 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Information Systems, Information Utilization, Librarians, Library Surveys

Cowen, Sonia S., Ed. (1995). Administration Self-Study and Evaluation Visit by the New Mexico Department of Education's Vocational-Technical Programs (April 17-20, 1995). This report presents results from a self-study of program administration and State Department of Education evaluation visit conducted at New Mexico State University's two-year branch campus at Carlsbad in April 1995. College activities and outcomes are described for the following 10 areas: (1) marketing, describing the college's marketing plan from administrative and faculty presentations at public meetings and high school career days to posters and program pamphlets; (2) special group enrollment, including an affirmative action plan, outreach programs to recruit minorities and the disadvantaged, and services to meet student needs; (3) counseling and career advisement, indicating that counselors are available throughout the year to help students with academic and career questions; (4) developmental education, including basic skills instruction, tutorial assistance, and educational training plans for each student; (5) job placement services, describing departments and agencies involved in making graduates and students aware of job openings; (6) the effectiveness of the school library; (7) institutional planning, reviewing the clarity of institutional mission and philosophy and efforts to coordinate with other agencies; (8) evaluation, specifying that all programs, faculty, administrative staff, and institutional goals are to be annually evaluated; (9) community education, including short-term courses for employees to improve job skills and services provided to high school students and displaced workers; and (10) professional development plans for full and part-time staff.   [More]  Descriptors: Affirmative Action, Career Counseling, Community Colleges, Community Education

New Mexico State Commission on Postsecondary Education, Santa Fe. (1976). Fourth Annual Report of the State Commission on Postsecondary Education. A Report to the Governor and Legislature. State of New Mexico. This fourth annual report of the New Mexico State Commission on Postsecondary Education essentially describes activities in five areas. The finance and budget review section provides a profile of public colleges and universities; branch colleges; four-year private colleges and universities; as well as outlining the actual operating expenditures for 1975-76, the capital outlay projects approved for that period, and an analytical approach to the differential funding. The section on instructional programs provides information on the academic programs in both public and private institutions, enrollment reports, and degrees awarded. A directory of proprietary institutions operating in the state is provided. Regional planning meetings and efforts at coordination are highlighted. The Commission's responsibilities for federal and special programs are detailed specifically with regard to the Section 1202-1203 of the Higher Education Amendments in the area of planning; Title I of the Higher Education Amendments in the area of community service and continuing education; and Title VI in the area of Financial Assistance for the Improvement of Undergraduate Instruction. A description of 1975-76 projects is provided. The Commission's Budget for the 1975-76 year is given.   [More]  Descriptors: Annual Reports, Budgets, Educational Finance, Educational Planning

Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM. (1975). Leadership Conference in Elementary Science Education (University of New Mexico, Summer 1975). Curriculum Report Series No. 19.00. Presenting a comparative analysis of seven different science programs designed for education at the elementary level, these proceedings focus on science education training and leadership roles for Bureau of Indian Affairs educators. Included are: (1) a description of the University of New Mexico's summer training program, detailing program objectives, activities, and evaluation procedures; (2) the philosophy of science (distinctions between process and products); (3) the goals of science education (Craig's "basic purpose", Newport's six basic goals, the scientifically literate person, basic training assumptions); (4) an overview of the seven science programs detailing costs and objectives (Science Curriculum Improvement Study; Science A Process Approach; Individualized Science; Conceptually Oriented Program in Elementary Science; Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies; Space Time Energy and Matter; Elementary Science Study); (5) a comparative analysis of the seven programs by program participants in terms of process (observing, measuring, recording, interpreting data, using data, predicting, classifying, etc.) and general characteristics (grade level; activity and/or process orientation; teacher and student materials available; nonreading; life, physical, or general science; complete or supplementary program; etc.).   [More]  Descriptors: Activities, American Indians, Comparative Analysis, Criteria

Holemon, Richard L.; And Others (1969). Concerted Services in New Mexico: An Evaluation of Developmental Change. Center Research and Development Report No. 5. Concerted Services in Training and Education was conceived as one way to minimize the dysfunctional effects of technological developments on rural communities. Three pilot projects were established to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a concerted approach to solving the training problem and other needs of rural people. One project was located in Sandoval County, New Mexico, and a 10-member evaluation team conducted an examination to determine the operational context, the resources brought into the county as a result of Concerted Services, the means or process of change, and lasting outcomes. Some major recommendations were: (1) To alleviate confusion, the agency name and objectives should be changed, (2) An Indian with professional training and experience should be added to the staff, (3) The coordinator should recruit unemployed leaders to participate in training programs, (4) Concerted Services should be placed directly under the control of a federal agency, and lines of authority and responsibility should be clarified, and (5) Implementation of future projects should be preceded by planning for evaluation. Related documents in this issue are VT 011 404 and VT 011 474-476.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Programs, Employment Problems, Needs, Pilot Projects

Bjork, Lars G. (1985). The Entrepreneurial University: A Case Study of the University of New Mexico in a Competitive Research Environment, 1972-1978. Factors affecting the emergence of the University of New Mexico as a research institution in a period of increased competition for research support are discussed. The case study covers the period of 1972-1978 and focuses on the development of the Office of the Vice President for Research and its entrepreneurial activities, including its increased utilization of political action, interorganizational cooperation, and the creation of an image of itself as a research university. Attention is directed to internal demands for increased support of research activities as well as competition for external support from the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. The institution's participation in a university consortium to manage the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory occurred during a period when the laboratory was emerging as a significant competitor for federal energy research support. An overview of the linkages between universities and the federal government is included, along with information on the ethnohistorical approach used in collecting the data for the case study, which is designed for use in graduate student seminars. Descriptors: Case Studies, Change Strategies, College Faculty, Competition

Gradman, Harry L.; Young, Robert W. (1972). Evaluating Reading Materials in Navajo: Report of a Teachers' Conference (Gallup, New Mexico, April 28-29, 1972). Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 18. Elementary-grade reading materials produced in the Navajo language were evaluated at a teacher's conference held in Gallup, New Mexico, on April 28-29, 1972. Participants, mostly teachers, at the conference numbered approximately 45. The 5 texts evaluated were "Mosilgai" (School Cat), "Jasper," Pabii Doo Masi" (Puppy and Cat), "Da'iida" (Eat), and "Hastoi Taa." Each of the books was discussed in detail by the authors, who presented the rationale behind their work, and then by conference participants, many of whom had familiarized themselves with the books through classroom use. Criticisms were presented not so much in terms of text revision, but rather in terms of future materials preparation. Also discussed were the relationship between spelling and dialect, the possibility of alternate readers, and better fit for different dialect areas; but the discussion remained unresolved. In addition, some objections to the size of the print, essentially 12 point IBM Directory type, were discussed. It was generally agreed that for beginning readers the type size should be larger (36 point), with reduction to take place in higher level readers.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Languages, Bilingual Education, Conferences, Elementary School Students

Johnson-O'Malley National Association. (1996). Johnson-O'Malley National Association Conference Planning Committee 1995 Report (Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 4-8, 1995). This document summarizes proceedings of the 1995 Johnson-O'Malley (JOM) National Association Conference. The first section of the report overviews the history of the JOM program established through the Act of April 16, 1934. The goal of this legislation was to improve American Indian and Alaska Native education by increasing parental involvement. The act put JOM program funds into the general fund and local control of public school districts. However, in 1970 the Bureau of Indian Affairs phased out JOM from this funding source and converted the funding agreements to supplemental status. Since then JOM programs have experienced funding problems and lack of support from Congress. In 1994, the first JOM National Conference was held in Denver, Colorado, and the National Johnson-O'Malley Association was established, comprising representatives from tribal governments, tribal elders, Indian education committees, parents, students, educators, and administrators. The 1995 JOM conference held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was attended by over 400 people. The remainder of the report highlights conference proceedings, including workshops and work sessions, program cochairs' reports, resolution committee report, and a chronology of association activities during 1995. Appendices include 1995 JOM National Association Conference Planning Committee Board of Directors, JOM National Association Bylaws, a summary of 1994 JOM National Conference proceedings, 1996-97 JOM National Association Board of Directors, and minutes from the 1995 JOM National Planning Committee Meeting.   [More]  Descriptors: Advocacy, American Indian Education, Conferences, Educational Legislation

Frieder-Vierra, Andrea (1975). School-Year and Summer Reading Growth of Minority and Non-Minority Children in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This study investigated whether summer vacation accounts for more of the reading achievement gap between minority and non-minority children than does the school year. To test for the summer effect, the reading subtests of the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills were administered to approximately 1,200 fifth-grade children in 15 public schools in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Ethnic, income, and residential data were also collected. Results indicated that summer does not account for more of the reading gap between minority and non-minority children; in fact, the gap closed during the summer and widened during the school year. Residence is the most effective variable in this context. Three calendar-year learning patterns emerged. The first involves substantial school-year loss offset by summer gain. The second involves moderate school-year gain offset by summer loss. The third involves excellent school-year gain and no summer loss. These patterns are described in terms of barrio and non-barrio Chicano children in different income groups. The results of this study were also compared to the results of three previous related studies. The comparisons and results are discussed. Descriptors: Doctoral Dissertations, Grade 5, Intermediate Grades, Mexican Americans

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Div. of Adult Education. (1967). An Inquiry into the Effects of Goals in the Motivation of Adult Students in the New Mexico Adult Basic Education Program. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to identify and describe the motivation of adult basic education students, (2) to determine if a relationship exists between goals, and (3) to determine how the knowledge of these findings can influence program development. Some 750 adult students were selected from 10 communities in New Mexico. Information was gathered with the use of 2 forms. One form was filled in by the students and consisted of open-end questions designed to get answers on goals, needs, motivation, and student characteristics. The second form consisted of attendance charts kept by the teacher for 12 weeks. Results of this study showed that the students could be grouped into 1 of 3 goals categories: (1) the student who wishes to learn how to speak, read, and write in the English language; (2) the student who wishes to obtain better employment opportunities; and (3) the student who wishes to pass the General Educational Development examination. Findings indicated that attendance and motivation were high in categories 1 and 3 but extremely low in category 2. This led to the conclusion that attendance and high motivation are directly proportional to the nearness or achievability of one's goal.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Age Differences, American Indians, Dropouts

FITZPATRICK, MILDRED; AND OTHERS (1966). APPROVED TITLE I, ESEA PROJECTS FOR NEW MEXICO, 1966-67, BASED ON 85 PERCENT OF THE 1965-66 ALLOCATION. THIS BOOKLET LISTS GUIDELINES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT (ESEA) TITLE I FUNDS IN LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN NEW MEXICO, AND OFFERS AN ABSTRACT OF EACH OF THE 91 INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS. THE LOCAL DISTRICT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR DETERMINING WHICH PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS MEET THE LOW-INCOME CRITERIA FOR RECEIVING FUNDS. EACH DISTRICT MUST ALSO PROVIDE THE DATA, BASED ON ANALYSIS OF THE CHILDREN'S NEEDS, TO SUBSTANTIATE THEIR APPLICATION FOR FUNDS. CONSULTATION WITH PRIVATE SCHOOL OFFICIALS AND COMMUNITY ACTION PROJECT REPRESENTATIVES IS REQUIRED BY ESEA. FUNDS MUST BE USED FOR APPROVED PURPOSES ONLY, AND CAREFUL, COORDINATED FISCAL RECORDS MUST BE KEPT. THE LOCAL DISTRICT MUST PROVIDE AN EVALUATION OF THE PROJECT WHICH STRESSES BASELINE DATA, EVALUATION TECHNIQUES, AND TEST RESULTS. THE BOOKLET LISTS THE ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT AND THE PERSONNEL RESPONSIBLE FOR ESEA PROJECTS IN EVERY LOCAL DISTRICT. THE ABSTRACTS OF INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS OUTLINE OBJECTIVES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES, APPROVED AMOUNT OF FUNDS, AND THE NUMBER OF PARTICIPATING CHILDREN. MOST OF THE OBJECTIVES FOCUS ON IMPROVING ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND SKILLS, ATTENDANCE, SCHOOL HOLDING POWER, ASPIRATION LEVEL, AND SELF-CONCEPT. IN SOME PROGRAMS PARTICULAR ATTENTION IS PAID TO PHYSICAL AND NUTRITIONAL PROBLEMS AND BILINGUALISM. IN GENERAL, PROGRAMS INCLUDED ENRICHMENT AND REMEDIATION, GUIDANCE, PROVISION OF FOOD, CLOTHING, AND HEALTH SERVICES, AND INSERVICE TRAINING.   [More]  Descriptors: Aspiration, Attendance, Bilingualism, Disadvantaged Youth

Burr, Marjorie (1992). Increasing Participation and Success of Minorities and Women at Dona Ana Branch Community College. Submitted to [the] New Mexico Commission on Higher Education. In June 1992, Dona Ana Branch Community College (DABCC) in Las Cruces, New Mexico, initiated a self-study to identify changes needed for fuller participation by minorities and women and to establish goals for student, faculty, and staff diversity. The self-study focused on college and program enrollments by gender and ethnicity; recruitment materials; admissions, orientation, and registration procedures; retention and completion rates of minorities and women; policies and practices supporting retention; transitions of program completers to jobs or further education; and faculty and staff diversity. The study found that in comparison to their representation in the service area, Blacks and American Indians were overrepresented in the spring 1992 college population and Hispanics were underrepresented. Men were overrepresented in technical programs. No patterns of ethnic bias in enrollment appeared in any program or division. Based on self-study findings, goals and related plans were developed, including the following: (1) develop a recruiting plan for areas with high concentrations of Hispanic and Black students; (2) develop a proactive marketing plan to promote gender equity; (3) modify admission, orientation, placement, and advising procedures to better integrate students into the college community; (4) increase faculty and staff awareness of cultural diversity issues; (5) improve financial aid services; (6) enhance articulation with bachelor's degree programs; (7) undertake efforts to employ an ethnically diverse faculty; and (8) encourage occupational students to consider teaching careers. DABCC's mission statment is appended. (Contains 17 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academic Persistence, Affirmative Action, College Attendance

Goldhaber, Gerald M. (1971). Communication and Student Unrest: A Report to the President of the University of New Mexico; Part I: Student-Administration Channels, Student Faculty Channels. This initial segment of a three-part study (Communication and Student Unrest) is an examination of the various communication channels–informal and formal, vertical and horizontal–which exist for student-administration and student-faculty interaction. Student-administration and student-faculty communication channels are discussed separately, and each section includes a general description of how the varied channels function, an evaluation of selected channels, and recommendations for improving channel effectiveness based on the researcher's evaluations. Section 1 contains functional analyses of the University of New Mexico's "Open Door Policy," secretarial channels, the president's weekly "rap" session in the student union, and KUMN radio's interview show. Section 2 focuses on student-faculty channels and discusses instructional communication in depth. It examines classroom channels such as videotaped instruction, teaching assistants, course and instructor evaluation, faculty office hours, committee meetings, and student curriculum inputs. The author stresses the need for the establishment of an open and permissive interaction climate if effective and efficient communication is to occur. (See related document CS 500 236.)   [More]  Descriptors: Activism, College Administration, Communication (Thought Transfer), Dissent

Chin, Laura, Ed.; And Others (1975). The Farmington Report: A Conflict of Cultures. A Report of the New Mexico Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights….. In response to numerous complaints from Navajo leaders, the New Mexico Advisory Committee undertook this study of the complex social and economic relationships that bind the city of Farmington and the Navajo Reservation. This report examines issues relating to community attitudes; the administration of justice; provisions of health and medical services; alcohol abuse and alcoholism; employment; and economic development on the Navajo Reservation and its real and potential impact on the city of Farmington and San Juan County. From testimony of participants during a three-day open meeting in Farmington and from extensive field investigation, the Advisory Committee has concluded that Native Americans in almost every area suffer from injustice and maltreatment. Recommendations are addressed to local, county, State, and Federal agencies. They include: establishing a human relations committee in Farmington; developing a comprehensive alcohol abuse and alcoholism program; coordination between public and private health facilities to provide adequate services to Navajos; upgrading the community relations program of the Farmington Police Department; affirmative action by private and public employers; and compliance with the "Indian Preference" clause by private employers on the reservations.   [More]  Descriptors: Alcoholism, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Civil Rights

Bjork, Lars G. (1985). Executive Succession and Institutional Change: A Case Study of the University of New Mexico, 1967-1972. The history of the University of New Mexico during 1967-1972, when a new president was appointed, is examined. Attention is focused primarily on the environmental milieu relating to federal support of university research and the president's leadership initiative in establishing the Office of the Vice President for Research. In reviewing institutional developments, consideration is given to environmental change, institutional adaptation, and leadership. Executive succession appeared to come at a time in the university's development when a shift toward research was necessary to maintain the institution's equilibrium with its external environment. The president recognized not only the importance of faculty research but the need to initiate change in the university's internal structure. The Office of Vice President for Research was needed to provide administrative support for faculty research and to establish an administrative proposal-review mechanism and a grant-evaluation and reporting mechanism. An overview of the linkages between universities and the federal government is included, along with information on the ethnohistorical approach used in collecting the data for the case study. Descriptors: Case Studies, Change Strategies, College Faculty, College Presidents

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