Bibliography: New Mexico (page 147 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Atilano A. Valencia, Glen Hugh Mitchell, Howard Keaton Conley, Minorities Task Force on Women, BONNIE E. NELSON, Sonia S. Cowen, Friedrich Freddy Kustaa, Inc. Americans for Indian Opportunity, Washington Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), and Salt Lake City. Health Education Dept. Utah Univ.

Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. (1973). Bureau of Indian Affairs ESEA Titles I – III – VI Conference (Sheraton-Western Skies, Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 28 – March 5, 1971). Final Report. Documenting the proceedings of the 1971 Conference on Titles I, III, and VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, this document presents edited transcripts from the conference held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The format is such that the major speakers are identified for each of the four sessions, the thrust of each major speech is recorded, and pertinent dialogue between speakers and participants is presented. The speeches and discussions center upon the services available to handicapped American Indian children; the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the role of its schools in exceptional child education; teacher education for those involved in teaching handicapped Indian children; explications and definitions relative to Titles I, III, and VI of ESEA; funding possibilities; etc. Major speakers are identified as representatives from the U.S. Office of Education; Western Michigan University; the University of Arizona; the Albuquerque Public Schools; the Bureau of Indian Affairs; school boards; and the National Indian Education Advisory Committee. It is suggested that these edited proceedings will encourage the development of quality school programs for Indian children in need of exceptional child education and will better acquaint the reader with ESEA Titles I, III, and VI.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Conference Reports, Definitions, Exceptional Child Education

Artesia Public Schools, NM. (1973). Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program, 1973-1974. Health, Science, Social Studies, New Mexico History, English as a Second Language, Multiculturalism. Third Grade, Level 3. This volume presents suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on instruction in health, science, social studies, New Mexico history, English as a second language, and multiculturalism, at the third grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for formal learning and formal training is the linguistic and cultural heritage that the child brings to the school situation. The Learning Loop method is used, involving five basic steps in the presentation of all subject matter: (1) diagnosis–recognizing the child's needs; (2) prescription–outlining the child's learning activities; (3) commitment–willingness of the child to learn; (4) treatment–teaching time spent; (5) evaluation of the child's accomplishments. The volume is divided into six major sections, each dealing with one of the subject areas and itself divided into smaller units. The guidelines for each unit are presented in terms of concept or objective to be taught, content, resources and materials, and evaluation. Criterion-referenced inventory cards for student evaluation accompany the text.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Criterion Referenced Tests, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Guides

Utah Univ., Salt Lake City. Health Education Dept. (1993). Kids, Schools, & Health: Where Do We Stand? Results of the 1993 New Mexico Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Native American Schools. This report summarizes the major results of a youth risk behavior survey administered to 1,549 students (grades 9-12) in 14 New Mexico schools identified as predominantly "Native American." The purpose of this report is to stimulate useful discussions into ways to increase informed support for effective, school-based comprehensive health education programs. A similar report presents results from schools not identified as "Native American." Of responding students, 77.5 percent described themselves as Native American or Alaska Native. After a brief description of the survey methodology, statistics and graphs are presented in the following areas: (1) unintentional and intentional injuries relating to motor vehicles, violence, and suicide; (2) tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; (3) sexual behaviors relating to HIV/AIDS education, other sexually transmitted diseases, commencement and frequency of intercourse, pregnancy, and condom use; (4) dietary behaviors relating to obesity and fat consumption; and (5) physical inactivity and exercise. Most statistics are disaggregated by gender and grade, with males showing higher levels of risk behavior on most parameters. National statistics and relevant "year 2000 objectives" provide a broader context for understanding. A final section lists the elements of a successful comprehensive school health program. Contains 41 references.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Drinking, Drug Use, Eating Habits

Kustaa, Friedrich Freddy (1993). A Description and Analysis of the Perspectives on Leadership Effectiveness of African-American Student Leaders at the University of New Mexico. A Qualitative Research Study. This report concerns a qualitative study on African-American leadership effectiveness as perceived and defined by African-American student leaders at the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque). Six African-American student leaders (three males and three females) participated in-depth interviews. The interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. The transcribed documents were analyzed to determine the themes from students' responses on the question of leadership effectiveness. The study did not evaluate leadership capabilities and qualities of students. The study's major objective was the creation of at least one hypothesis based on a theory of leadership grounded in the data. The students provided definitions of leadership in terms of: (1) goals of leadership; (2) charismatic leadership; (3) style of leadership; (4) dynamics of diplomacy, creativity, and communication; and (5) leader behavior. Participants also provided their views on the internal dynamics of organizational change and its relationship to leadership. Overall, many of the participants felt that African-American student leaders face a peculiar challenge due in some measure to the underrepresentation of their group. Based on interview comments, the following hypothesis emerged: students with leadership experience before coming to college are more likely to become leaders in college when they perceive that there is a vacuum or lack of leadership in an organization where they happen to be. (Contains 41 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Affective Behavior, Black Leadership, Black Students, College Students

Artesia Public Schools, NM. (1973). Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program, 1973-1974. Health, Science, Social Studies, New Mexico History, English as a Second Language, Multiculturalism. First Grade, Level 1. This volume presents suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on instruction in health, science, social studies, New Mexico history, English as a second language, and multiculturalism, at the first grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for formal learning and formal training is the linguistic and cultural heritage that the child brings to the school situation. The Learning Loop method is used, involving five basic steps in the presentation of all subject matter: (1) diagnosis–recognizing the child's needs; (2) prescription–outlining the child's learning activities; (3) commitment –willingness of the child to learn; (4) treatment — teaching time spent; and (5) evaluation of the child's accomplishments. The volume is divided into six major sections, each dealing with one of the subject areas and itself divided into smaller units. The guidelines for each unit are presented in terms of concept or objective to be taught, content, resources and materials, and evaluation. Criterion-referenced inventory cards for student evaluation accompany the text.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Criterion Referenced Tests, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Guides

Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. (1968). Proceedings of a Conference on Early Childhood Education for American Indians (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. Mexico, March 5-7, 1968). The Conference on Early Childhood Education was held during Early Childhood Education Week (March 1968) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Conference participants included Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) school personnel responsible for the establishment and coordination of proposed BIA kindergartens, representatives of National, public, and voluntary organizations and agencies, colleges and universities, State Departments of Education, and other school and community representatives who are concerned and involved in Indian education. The conference provided an opportunity for participants to consider, explore, and exchange ideas about the objectives and factors involved in planning, establishing, and implementing comprehensive early childhood education programs and to give participants the opportunity for continued dialogues to help assure the development of these programs. The conference report presents speeches, discussions, and question and answer periods considering early childhood education from the perspective of: the conference objectives; anthropology; the structure of the learning process; a staff development program using a college, teachers, aides, administrators, and program assistants; health and nutrition; social services; parent and community roles; curriculum development; and the next steps for BIA implementation. Symposium chairmen and discussion coordinators are listed in the front of the publication; speakers are listed by section.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Anthropology, Community Role, Comprehensive Programs

NELSON, BONNIE E., ED. (1968). PROGRAMS FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO, UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO, AND UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT. FOR A REPORT ON GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN ENGLISH, THE ASSOCIATION OF DEPARTMENTS OF ENGLISH AND THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER AT THE MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION OBTAINED INFORMATION FROM CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS OFFERING GRADUATE WORK IN ENGLISH. SOME OF THE BASIC DATA ASSEMBLED FOR THE FULL REPORT (AVAILABLE AS TE 500 075) ARE THE THREE DESCRIPTIONS OF MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (MAT) PROGRAMS CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT. A REVISED PROPOSAL FOR THE MAT WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO OUTLINES THE OBJECTIVES AND COURSES FOR THIS DEGREE. THE MAJOR PORTION OF THE DOCUMENT CONSISTS OF "COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DEGREE PROGRAM LEADING TO THE MASTER OF ARTS IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH" AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO. PETER PROUSE, COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN, DESCRIBES THE COURSES, AND DISCUSSES THE PURPOSE AND REQUIREMENTS FOR THIS DEGREE AS WELL AS THE NEW TRENDS IN ENGLISH EDUCATION AND OTHER FACTORS RELATED TO THE NEED FOR THE MAT. A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE MAT PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT IS ALSO INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Degree Requirements, Degrees (Academic), Educational Trends, English

Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC. (1987). Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Public Hearing. Report of the Proceedings (Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22, 1987). The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston (Massachusetts), Chicago (Illinois), Kansas City (Missouri), and Los Angeles (California) between Fall 1987 and Spring 1988. The final report of the task force was produced in December, 1989. This document is the verbatim transcript of the public hearing. Co-Chairs Mr. Jaime Oaxaca and Dr. Ann Reynolds conducted the hearing. Following an opening statement by co-chair Dr. Reynolds, speakers included: (1) Dr. Dewayne Matthews; (2) Ms.  Elizabeth Gallegos; (3) Mr. Gregory P. Kennedy; (4) Dr. Jack Cole; (5) Mr. Robert L. Knutilla; (6) Ms. Louella Marr; (7) Ms. Katherine Harris Tijerina; (8) Mr. Norbert Hill; (9) Ms. Sheila Tobias; (10) Dr. Julie Haynes Lutz; (11) Dr. Nina Kay; (12) Mr. Tony Gallegos; (13) Mr. Francisco Guevara; (14) Dr. Matthew D. Padilla; (15) Ms. Rosemary Frederickson; (16) Mr. Gary Townsend; (17) Mr. Jerry Watkins; (18) Mr. Ted Barber; (19) Dr. Richard Griego; (20) Dr. John Foley; (21) Dr. Nancy Felipe Russo; (22) Dr. Henry J. Casso; (23) Ms. Connie Alexander; (24) Ms. Barbara Torres; (25) Dr. Leo Gomez; (26) Dean Ann Erickson; (27) Mr. Jim Tarro; and (28) Dr. Kirk MacGugan.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, College Science, Disabilities, Elementary School Science

Artesia Public Schools, NM. (1973). Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program, 1973-1974. Health, Science, Social Studies, New Mexico History, English as a Second Language, Multiculturalism. Fourth Grade, Level 4. This volume presents suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on instruction in health, science, social studies, New Mexico history, English as a second language, and multiculturalism, at the fourth grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for formal learning and formal training is the linguistic and cultural heritage that the child brings to the school situation. The Learning Loop method is used, involving five basic steps in the presentation of all subject matter: (1) diagnosis–recognizing the child's needs; (2) prescription–outlining the child's learning activities; (3) commitment–willingness of the child to learn; (4) treatment–teaching time spent; (5) evaluation of the child's accomplishments. The volume is divided into six major sections, each dealing with one of the subject areas and itself divided into smaller units. The guidelines for each unit are presented in terms of concept or objective to be taught, content, resources and materials, and evaluation. Criterion-referenced inventory cards for student evaluation accompany the text.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Criterion Referenced Tests, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Guides

Mitchell, Glen Hugh (1976). An Exploratory Study of Low Income Spanish-American Families in Dona Ana County, New Mexico: Their Marketing and Credit Practices. Utilizing a 77-item questionnaire, the marketing and credit practices of the Spanish American poor in New Mexico were examined. Randomly selected from the Community Action Program files, approximately 100 households in Las Cruces, the main urban center, and 60 households in the small rural communities of Dona Ana and La Mesa (30 in each) were interviewed in the fall of 1969 and the winter of 1970. Interviews were conducted either in English or Spanish as the respondents preferred. A follow-up study was done in 1975 by a brief questionnaire mailed out twice to the original 160 respondents. The 71 returned questionnaires were compared to the original 71 questionnaires of 1969-70. The 1969-70 findings included: most stated one should know the firm or an employee "well" before buying any major item (above $200) at a store; most spent over a month of "search-time" in deciding on what and where to buy; fewer than 12% had checking accounts; fewer than 16% had savings accounts; about 3/10 of the families shopped in Juarez, Mexico for "cheaper" and "different" foods; and the high rate of indebtedness was usually for medical, death, or cars. The 1975 findings included: the average respondent reported being farther in debt, but felt they were better able to handle the indebtedness; over 30% were on the food stamp plan; and the majority of purchases over $200 were on credit.   [More]  Descriptors: Consumer Economics, Credit (Finance), Economic Status, Economically Disadvantaged

Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM. (1977). Education as Power. Report of Americans for Indian Opportunity Title IV, Part A, Technical Assistance Conference (Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 4-6, 1977). Included in this report on the 1977 Title IV Part A Technical Assistance conference held in Albuquerque are: (1) a descriptive narrative of conference events; (2) a summary of the 120 evaluation responses; and (3) the resolutions adopted by conference participants as a specific vehicle to make their concerns known to the Office of Indian Education (OIE), other Indian groups, the Congress, etc. Centering on the theme "Education as Power", the conference agenda is described as including: speeches and workshops addressing the following three sub-themes: "Parent and Student Power"; "Knowledge as Power" (included workshop sessions aimed at program development, organizational development, and cultural bases for Title IV Part A programs); and "Institutional Power". Conference participants (N=322) are identified as: parent committees, school administrators, students, and Title IV coordinators coming from Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The resolutions presented here reflect concern that the National Indian Education Association establish a division located in Washington, D. C. to monitor legislative and administrative activity and to develop a communications system for all Parent Committees to provide such information on a timely basis, and that all conference participants call upon the President and the Congress to support and pass legislation extending the Indian Education Act and to provide full funding to meet the special needs of Indian children. Descriptors: Advisory Committees, Agency Role, American Indians, Communication (Thought Transfer)

Artesia Public Schools, NM. (1973). Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program, 1973-1974. Health, Science, Social Studies, New Mexico History, English as a Second Language, Multiculturalism. Second Grade, Level 2. This volume presents suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on instruction in health, science, social studies, New Mexico history, English as a second language, and multiculturalism, at the second grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for formal learning and formal training is the linguistic and cultural heritage that the child brings to the school situation. The Learning Loop method is used, involving five basic steps in the presentation of all subject matter: (1) diagnosis–recognizing the child's needs; (2) prescription–outlining the child's learning activities; (3) commitment–willingness of the child to learn; (4) treatment–teaching time spent; and (5) evaluation of the child's accomplishments. The volume is divided into six major sections, each dealing with one of the subject areas and itself divided into smaller units. The guidelines for each unit are presented in terms of concept or objective to be taught, content, resources and materials, and evaluation. Criterion-referenced inventory cards for student evaluation accompany the text.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Criterion Referenced Tests, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Guides

Valencia, Atilano A. (1971). Bilingual/Bicultural Education — An Effective Learning Scheme for First Grade and Second Grade Spanish Speaking, English Speaking, and American Indian Children in New Mexico. The 1970-71 evaluation of the Grants, New Mexico, Bilingual Education Project is reported through narrative description of tests administered and their results, statistical findings from analyses of variance or covariance of test results, and conclusions and recommendations based on test results. In the evaluation, the 147 students in the experimental and the 35 students in the control group–representing 6 schools and 4 language references (Keresan, English, Spanish, and Navajo)–were given various tests for which a pre-test/post-test measure was used to ascertain significant experimental group gains over an 8-month period: the Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory Test of Oral English Production; the California Achievement Test; the Test of Basic Experiences (a Spanish-language instrument measuring concept comprehension in science, social studies, and mathematics); the Caldwell Test (a Spanish-language instrument for measuring a child's ability to provide responses about himself and his role activities); and the author's Cultural Sensitivity Instrument (a pictorial and manipulatory measure of perceptions and attitudes concerning Anglo Americans, American Indians, and Mexican Americans). Also, a questionnaire was designed and administered to ascertain perceptions and attitudes of school personnel about the bilingual program components. There are 24 tables.   [More]  Descriptors: Achievement Tests, American Indians, Anglo Americans, Attitude Measures

Conley, Howard Keaton (1973). An Investigation of the Attitudes of School Administrators and School Board Presidents Toward Career Education in Public Schools of New Mexico. In an effort to assess, compare, and contrast the attitudes of school administrators and board of education presidents toward career education in the public schools of New Mexico, 88 school districts in the State were surveyed. Findings included: (1) Most of the respondents agreed with the existing State-adopted career education definition with integration of career-oriented courses and activities into the present curriculum, (2) Funding for career education was given priority over teacher's salaries, general curriculum development, and student activities, (3) Only a small percent of elementary principals rated career education as their first or second priority, (4) Slightly positive attitudes were generally held by all groups surveyed, (5) No significant difference was found in attitude toward career education relative to the undergraduate degree obtained. Respondents not having a baccalaureate degree, however, had a less positive attitude toward career education than did degree holders, (6) A negative correlation existed between age of respondent and attitude held toward career education, and (7) A slightly positive relationship existed between years of work experience outside the field of education and attitude displayed toward career education. Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Boards of Education, Career Education, Comparative Analysis

Cowen, Sonia S. (1995). Vocational-Technical and Professional Studies' Academic Programs and Support Services Self-Study and Evaluation Visit by the New Mexico Department of Education's Vocational-Technical Programs (April 17-20, 1995). This report presents results from an April 1995 self-study of academic programs and support services in the vocational-technical and professional studies division at New Mexico State University's two-year branch campus at Carlsbad. College activities and outcomes are described for the following 12 programs and centers: pre-business, the Career Development Center, community service and continuing education, computer science, criminal justice, electronics technology, environmental science and technology, the Learning Assistance Center, paralegal studies, nursing, secretarial administration, and welding technology. For each program or center, the report describes activities at the college which fulfill state standards related to the following: (1) facilities, including size, cleanliness, lighting, and ventilation; (2) equipment, including availability, maintenance, and inventory; (3) instructional materials, including availability, reference materials, and variety; (4) organization and teaching methods, including goals, curricula, and sequential courses; (5) enrollment criteria, including minimum entry standards, achievement tests, and basic/developmental and remedial education; (6) advisory committees, including members, regularly scheduled meetings, and evaluation; and (7) job placement and planning, including the availability of placement data, student follow-ups, and employer satisfaction.   [More]  Descriptors: Career Counseling, Community Colleges, Community Education, Continuing Education

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