Bibliography: New Mexico (page 151 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Richard P. Williams, Las Cruces. New Mexico State Univ, Sandra Scott, Vera John-Steiner, Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. New Mexico Univ, Joseph P. Cardillo, New Mexico Commission on Higher Education, and Bernard Spolsky.

Spolsky, Bernard, Comp.; And Others (1975). Description and Bibliography, Revised 1975. Navajo Reading Study. Begun in 1969, the Navajo Reading Study investigated the feasibility and effect of teaching Navajo children to read their own language before they start learning to read English. Conducted at the University of New Mexico and supported by grants from the Ford Foundation and contracts with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the U.S. Office of Education, the Study involved language studies, a dictionary project, sociolinguistic studies, a survey of reading materials, preparation of Navajo reading materials, evaluation and coordination, teacher training projects at Sanostee-Toadlena and Ramah, preparation of a Navajo bilingual curriculum, development of a model for analysis and evaluation of bilingual education, and a survey of American Indian Bilingual Education. A series of books were produced by the Study to help meet the needs for material for Navajos learning to read their own language. The Study also published several books in cooperation with Rock Point Community School, assisted the Sanostee Project to prepare various books and a monthly reader, and prepared progress reports. This report presents brief descriptions of the Study's components and a bibliography listing 39 books produced by the Study, 26 publications of the Sanostee Project, 13 Rock Point publications, 25 progress reports, and 16 publications published elsewhere.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, American Indian Languages, American Indians, Bibliographies

Williams, Richard P. (1969). A High Versus Low Rationale Approach in Teaching Reading. Final Report. A high versus low rationale approach in teaching reading to grade-7 students was tested. The high rationale included using a traditional basal series approach that emphasized the ability to identify "the reasons why of how to read" through rules or formulas. The low rationale approach deemphasized rules and formulas except as the need arose, and an individual approach was used. The control treatment was a high rationale individual approach. Teachers received inservice training for the approach used in their classroom. The population included all seventh graders in 27 classrooms randomly selected from the public junior high schools of Las Cruces, New Mexico. All subjects were pretested and post-tested in October and March with the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test, Survey E, forms 1 and 2. The Lorge-Thorndike Intelligence Tests were administered to all subjects before treatment procedures were initiated. A nested design was used. Treatment of data was by analysis of covariance. A separate subanalysis of Anglo-American and Spanish-American ethnic groups was processed within the design. No significant differences were found for intelligence, approach, vocabulary, rate, comprehension, or ethnic group. References, charts, tables, and appendixes are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Basic Reading, Bilingual Students, Grade 7, Individualized Reading

John-Steiner, Vera; And Others (1975). Learning Styles Among Pueblo Children. Final Report, August 1975. Observational, exploratory and verbal learning, and verbal and imaginal processes of Pueblo Indian children were compared with those of non-Indian (Anglo and Chicano) children. Both Pueblo and non-Indian adults and children were observed, interviewed, and asked to carry out various tasks. The children attended either a Tanoan or a Keresan day school, an Albuquerque public school, a summer school, or a commune school in New Mexico or a San Diego (California) elementary school. Mapping as an observational procedure, a learning experience interview, and story retelling and drawing were used to obtain data on learning processes and modes of representation. Story retelling was explored as a possible measure of bilingualism. Pueblo children were found to be self-confident and independent at an early age; they excelled in visual representation and showed a high interest in role play. Although their verbal expression in English was not as fluent as that of non-Indians, no evidence was found to support the view of the "silent" Indian child–on the contrary, in their native languages and/or in comfortable settings Pueblo children were willing and capable verbal communicators. All of these patterns were linked to the nature of Pueblo communities and the children's place in them.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, American Indians, Anglo Americans, Behavior Development

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1978). Navajo Administrator Training Program. The Navajo Administrator Training Program (NATP) was initiated to prepare graduate level Navajo administrators for Navajo schools. A cooperative program involving the Navajo Tribe, University of New Mexico, and the Carnegie Corporation, the nontraditional graduate program alternates intensive one-week on-campus sessions with five-week off-campus work experiences three times per semester during the academic year (six hours credit per semester). Students attend two eight-week summer sessions to complete the masters program in two years. Both field-based and university-based coordinators provide support services during off-campus periods. Of the 50 students enrolled since January 1975, 21 have graduated, most of whom are now holding administrative positions on the reservation.  Instructors are regular university staff and guest lecturers. In addition to traditional educational administration courses, special attention is given to unique Navajo problems and applications. NATP, an exportable model of quality graduate education, has increased the number of on-reservation Navajo administrators, enhanced Navajo self-sufficiency and self-determination in education, strengthened bonds between university and tribe, and provided a professional career ladder for a population whose advancement was previously limited. Descriptors: Administrator Education, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Career Ladders

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1969). The APSCOE Project in Secondary Education. An Experimental Teacher Training Program to Improve Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary School English and in Middle Schools. The aim of this locally-funded cooperative enterprise of the Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) and the College of Education (COE) of the University of New Mexico is to improve the training of secondary and middle school teachers and to improve the secondary English curriculum. Student teachers are selected competitively for the program, which includes one semester of courses on human development, teaching methods, and curriculum construction, followed by a semester of full-time student teaching for which participants receive a $350 stipend. The student teachers and cooperating teachers work in teams of five or six in special facilities that can accommodate up to 80 students. Along with university personnel, they also participate in interpersonal training sessions. The revised curriculum developed during the first 2 years of the program will be implemented this year and then revised again if necessary. APSCOE funding is accomplished by an agreement between APS and COE whereby expected teacher vacancies in the target schools are left unfilled and the money saved is allocated to APSCOE purposes. The personnel gap is filled by the full-time student teachers.   [More]  Descriptors: College School Cooperation, Curriculum Development, Educational Finance, English Curriculum

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1980). American Indian Bilingual Education Center 1979-80 Handbook. To better serve administrators, teaching staff, parents, and others active in Title VII bilingual education in a region comprised of New Mexico and parts of Arizona, Utah, and Colorado in which the principal tribes are Apache, Navajo, and Pueblo, the 1979-80 Handbook provides a complete listing and explanation of American Indian Bilingual Education Center (AIBEC) goals and objectives, a complete description of AIBEC services, and step-by-step procedures for requesting those services. The Handbook defines the AIBEC service delivery systems in terms of overall goals and objectives which involve: (1) updating programmatic needs assessment; (2) providing training, technical, and programmatic assistance coordinated with other agencies; (3) pilot testing of instructional materials; (4) maintaining and improving service area communications systems; (5) collecting and disseminating American Indian bilingual education materials via the AIBEC Materials Bank; (6) training parents; (7) assisting institutions of higher education (IHEs) in developing teacher training programs and certification standards; (8) completing comparative analysis and linguistic survey of service area languages; and (9) aiding local education agencies (LEAs) in responding to new Title VII legislation requirements. Appendices contain sample request and evaluation forms; lists of regional LEAs, IHEs, and State Education Agencies; and addresses of General Assistance Centers. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Bilingual Education, Consultants

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1983). Indian Resource Development. Annual Report 1982-1983. During the 1982-83 fiscal year, Indian Resource Development (IRD) continued to work to fulfill its mission of assisting Indian tribes to gain effective control and management of the development of their natural resources by providing a cadre of educated and experienced Indian people to fill technical and management positions. Headquartered at New Mexico State University (NMSU), IRD works with Indian students and tribes throughout the state by encouraging the students to attend the university of their choice and major in natural resource related fields such as agriculture, veterinary medicine, forestry, fish and wildlife, geosciences, physical sciences, computer science, engineering, economics, statistics, management, or business. The annual report covers: recruitment and retention; student services (financial aid information and retention services); cognitive development; high school orientation (staff, student recruitment and selection, assessment, learning skills, special events, program evaluation); work experience for students; business (seminar, trust and real property management); College of Engineering at NMSU, Native American Program at UNM; agriculture; contacts (colleges and universities, Indian tribes, organizations and companies, government entities, and support); and institute development (the conversion of IRD to a stand alone unit under the College of Agriculture, funding, Indian advisory committee). Appendices include information material distributed, form letters, letters of support, and lists of student participants. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Career Guidance, College School Cooperation

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1976). Pilot Course in Century 21 Shorthand. An Evaluation of the Project. An evaluation project conducted at the Dona Ana County Occupational Education Branch of New Mexico State University was designed to compare the effectiveness of Century 21 Shorthand with Gregg Shorthand. Two classes of shorthand students were set up as experimental groups: thirty-five students in Century 21 and twenty-six students in Gregg. Their performance was assessed for four semesters based on the following performance measures: dictation speed, scores on theory tests, scores on brief form tests, and overall average grades. In addition, survival rates of students with different ethnic and language backgrounds were studied. After the first semester comparison results indicated no statistical difference in the performance of the two groups. Century 21 was found to have some slight advantage in holding power (perhaps because of its novelty). Additional data was gathered from each student utilizing the following forms: biographical information, Career Education Description Questionnaire, background information questionnaire, background and study habits questionnaire, American College Testing (ACT) scores, and teachers' summary of performance (grade book). The socio-economic measures seemed the best indicators of success, but it was too early to tell if the Career Education Description Questionnaire could predict some measure of success. (The questionnaires and the proposal for the evaluation are included in the appendix. Results of the second, third, and final semester evaluations are presented in separate documents.) Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Bilingual Students, Business Education, Comparative Analysis

Scott, Sandra (1979). Information Needs and Reading Interests of Adult Prisoners. The reading interests and information needs of adult prisoners were investigated. Questionnaires were completed by 314 residents of three New Mexico prisons, 290 men and 24 women, representing 20% of the total male incarcerated population and 41% of the total female incarcerated population. Background information generally revealed that the prisoners tended to be young and criminally unsophisticated; and highly represented by Hispanic individuals, high school dropouts, and substance abusers. Results indicated that: (1) information about getting more schooling or job training was the primary need; (2) as a group, males expressed considerable concern for managing their lives more successfully; (3) as a group, women were less interested in all types of information and only considered understanding the law to be important; (4) more women than men wanted information on getting along with others; (5) for men, best sellers and adventure stories were preferred fiction subjects, and people and places were the preferred non-fiction subjects; and (6) for women, romances and adventure stories were preferred fiction subjects and prison/prisoner literature and humor were the preferred non-fiction subjects. Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Individual Reading, Information Needs, Institutional Libraries

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1979). Handbook. American Indian Bilingual Education Center. As part of the National Network of Centers for Bilingual Education, the American Indian Bilingual Education Center (AIBEC) provides resource and training services for administrators, teaching staff, parents, and others active in all phases of Title VII bilingual education in a region (comprised of New Mexico and parts of Arizona, Utah, and Colorado) in which the principal tribes are Apache, Navajo, and Pueblo. AIBEC also attempts to coordinate Title VII bilingual education activities in regional LEAs, SEAs, and Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) via a service delivery system which involves: (1) conducting needs assessments and compiling linguistic information; (2) training, technical, and programmatic assistance coordinated with other agencies; (3) pilot testing of instructional materials; (4) a regional communications network; (5) collecting and disseminating American Indian bilingual education materials via the AIBEC Materials Bank; (6) parent training; and (7) comparative analyses and linguistic surveys of major American Indian languages in the region. The Handbook describes the Center's staff and services, and the complete procedures for requesting and receiving AIBEC services, including services provided by consultants. Appendices contain sample request and evaluation forms; lists of regional LEAs, SEAs, and IHEs; and addresses of General Assistance Centers. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Bilingual Education, Consultants

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1977). Pilot Course in Century 21 Shorthand. Fourth Semester. An Evaluation of the Project. Final Report. An evaluation project conducted at Dona Ana County Occupational Education Branch of New Mexico State University was designed to compare the effectiveness of Century 21 with Gregg Shorthand. Two classes of shorthand students were set up as experimental groups (due to student attrition, two more groups were added during the third semester). Their performance was assessed for four semesters based on the following performance measures: dictation speed, scores on theory tests, scores on brief form tests, and overall average grades. In addition, survival rates of students with different ethnic and language backgrounds were studied. After the fourth semester, the overall results indicated that: Gregg and Century 21 are equally successful methods in teaching shorthand to college students; Century 21 students take shorthand at higher speeds; Century 21 does not appeal to minority students or bilingual students any more than Gregg does; students with higher American College Testing (ACT) math scores are more successful in both shorthand courses than those students with low ACT math scores while English ACT and overall ACT scores show less of an influence on shorthand success. (The appendixes of this document include excerpts from the previous semester evaluations and a bibliography on shorthand prognosis. Results of the first, second, and third semester evaluations are reported in separate documents.) Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Bilingual Students, Business Education, Comparative Analysis

Cardillo, Joseph P. (1972). The Development of Competence and the Child Development Team: A Program Proposal. Several studies have suggested the importance of parent education in the prevention of incompetence. The child development and day care movements offer programs that show promise for preventing the incompetence associated with culturally deprived children. But many of these programs lack the elements necessary to break the cycle of poverty: (1) strong parent education components in child development and rearing; (2) high parent and community involvement in programming; (3) well-trained staff in child development and early childhood education; and (4) structured and concrete programs of language development that combine the cognitive, emotional, and motivational components of learning. The Bernalillo County (New Mexico) Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center is beginning a program in child development to foster the optimal development of preschool children through training their parents in child development, education and child rearing. A child development team consisting of a child development specialist and a child development associate will be assigned to work with each of 6 neighborhood mental health teams. The child development team will work closely with other children's agencies to foster normal development and make early identification of children with problems. The program will also develop a resource and training center to provide materials and training sessions for staff, other agencies, and parent groups.   [More]  Descriptors: Agency Cooperation, Child Development, Child Rearing, Cognitive Development

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1985). Computer Designed Instruction & Testing. Research findings on computer designed instruction and testing at the college level are discussed in 13 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching at New Mexico State University. Titles and authors are as follows: "Don't Bother Me with Instructional Design, I'm Busy Programming! Suggestions for More Effective Educational Software" (M. David Merrill); "Computerized Exam Administering System and Student Gradebook" (Greg Baker, Bob Creel); "A Retesting on Demand Strategy for General Physics Using Computer Generated Problems" (A. F. Burr); "Computer Based Special Education Teacher Training" (G. Phillip Cartwright); "Some Uses of the Computer in Teaching, Training and Testing: Student/Learner Self-Assessment Responding" (Darwin Hunt); "A Computer on Every Desk; Implications for the Educational Process" (Kenneth L. Krause, William E. Richardson, Lawrence G. Jones); "Writing CAI Tutorials with PILOT" (Robert Lucking); "Computerized Testing in Introductory Business Statistics: A Case Study" (Paul H. Randolph, W. J. Conover); "Creating Cost Effective CAI for the College Classroom: The Role of Templated Authoring Aids" (Boyd Richards); "Utilizing the Microcomputer as a Tax Planning Tool in Business and Education" (Stanley S. Scott); "Some Current and Projected Uses of Computer Technology in the Teaching of Statistics" (N. Scott Urquhart); "Students, Learning, and Computers: Surviving the Changes" (James Wade); and "Computer Aided Instruction for Freshman Chemistry at the U.S. Air Force Academy" (James R. Wright, Larry D. Strawser, John R. Balyeat, Larry P. Davis, Jesse L. James, Phillip Jung, Jonathan C. Noetzel, Donn M. Storch). Descriptors: Authoring Aids (Programing), Business Administration Education, Case Studies, College Instruction

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1979). Needs Assessment Survey and Goals and Objectives. Inservice training sessions for directors, teachers, and teacher aides were the services most commonly requested in a 1978 survey of administrators and staff of Title VII bilingual education programs in the American Indian Bilingual Education Center (AIBEC) service region of New Mexico and parts of Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. Respondents felt that Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) should help meet staff training needs with courses in bilingual education methodology and philosophy, American Indian art for classroom teachers, and curriculum development. All respondents endorsed pilot and field tests of classroom materials. More information regarding bilingual education and greater involvement in schools and learning activities were the most commonly requested services for parents. Respondents perceived AIBEC's role in the overall Title VII bilingual plan as including the provision of: a united effort for American Indian bilingual education, teacher training, and program and legislative information. Respondents recommended that AIBEC improve communications with regional Title VII programs. Based on the survey results, AIBEC's goals for 1978-79 included: conducting needs assessments; providing training, technical assistance, and programmatic assistance for LEAs; pilot testing of curriculum materials; organizing a communication system; materials collection; parent training; and linguistic survey and analysis. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Bilingual Education, Elementary Secondary Education

New Mexico Commission on Higher Education. (1997). Higher Education Funding Recommendations. 1989-99. This report presents the recommendations of the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education for funding public institutions of higher education in fiscal year 1998-99. An executive summary notes the recommendations' four key components: (1) a $28.7 million overall increase in higher education funding; (2) a commitment by institutions and the Commission to implement clear accountability measures; (3) a commitment by the institutions and the Commission to implement performance-based funding measures and to aggressively address deficiencies in retention rates, graduation rates, and quality assessments; and (4) a commitment by the institutions and the Commission to work through an Excellence in Higher Education Investment Fund to respond rapidly to specific state-level issues. The report presents six specific funding recommendations in order of priority, including base funding, compensation increases, and equipment replacement. An additional 14 recommendations that answer other needs are also listed. After an overview of the recommendations, tables present detailed financial data for instructional and general funding presented separately for four-year and two-year institutions, for the equipment replacement formula, and for the building renewal and replacement formula. Tables also detail financial recommendations for special schools: medical, military, and for the deaf and visually handicapped.   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Budgeting, College Instruction, College Outcomes Assessment

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *