Bibliography: New Mexico (page 152 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Walter Bromberg, Nancy M. Grogan, Las Cruces. Dept. of English. New Mexico State Univ, Alec M. Testa, Alejandro Lopez, Karen Stabler, Toni Hopper, Deborah Rifenbary, Lily Chu, and MARION CLINE.

Burrola, Luis Ramon; Rivera, Jose A. (1983). Chicano Studies Programs at the Crossroads: Alternative Futures for the 1980s. Working Paper #103. Fiscal reductions as well as growing conservatism may have a profound impact on many university programs, including Chicano Studies programs, which are expanding into research, publications, and other areas. To frame the issues of greatest concern to Chicano Studies programs, a small research effort at the University of New Mexico involved the input of 12 knowledgeable respondents at universities in the West and Southwest United States. The respondents served on a Delphi Panel and responded to two questionnaires. On the first, they suggested key issues for Chicano Studies programs. On the second, they ranked the importance of seven current and eight future issues, chosen from the responses to the first questionnaire. Respondents indicated that curriculum issues, academic quality, the potential for program consolidation, and the potential for program expansion were the most important current and future issues. Other issues included renewed interest in Chicano Studies, greater career orientation of Chicano programs, and broadened support for Chicano programs. The report presents five scenario themes for future research: status quo, consolidation/absorption, obsolescence, program development, and post-revisionist. Descriptors: Activism, Curriculum Development, Delphi Technique, Educational Environment

Lopez, Alejandro (1996). Hispanic Folk Arts and the Environment: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum Guide. A New Mexican Perspective. This interdisciplinary, bilingual curriculum resource, contains a 29-minute videotape program, 20 colorplate posters, and a curriculum guide. The resource presents an examination of the folklife and folklore expressions of the Hispanic people of New Mexico. The focus of the curriculum is the relationship of survival-based folk activities to the region's climate, geography, natural resources, and complex weave of cultures. Lessons in the curriculum guide include: (1) Land, River and Hispanic Settlements/Tierra, Rio y Asentamientos Hispanos; (2) Building Community: The Roots of Adobe/Creando Comunidad: Las Raices del Adobe; (3) Folk Arts in the Home: Rio Grande Weaving/Artes Populares del Hogar: Tejidos, Estilo Rio Grande; and (4) Foodways of the Rio Grande/Las Comidas del Rio Grande. Each lesson unit includes an introduction, timeline, and historic background information. Individual lessons include an introduction, objectives, vocabulary, required materials, motivation, preparation and procedure, and evaluation; classroom connections to visual arts, language arts, social studies, mathematics, and science; community connections; adult resources; and a list of relevant children's books and folktales. Poster descriptions, discussion questions, a video overview, and artists' biographies conclude the guide. The videotape gives an introduction to architectural and craft traditions, and demonstrates the techniques used to create: (1) Adobe Architecture and Plastering; (2) Bultos, Carved Saints; (3) Ironwork; (4) Colcha Embroidery; (5) Weaving; (6) Retablos, Painting of Saints; (7) Woodwork; (8) Straw Appliques; and (9) Tinwork. Descriptors: Architecture, Art Education, Built Environment, Elementary Secondary Education

Testa, Alec M., Ed. (1997). DATAWave, Volume 5, Numbers 1 through 7 (1/29/97 through 4/23/97), Datawave. The "DATAWave" is a publication of the Assessment Resource Office of Eastern New Mexico University (ENMU) (Portales) that reports on research conducted by that unit and research related to the university community. This volume contains seven issues. The first issue reports on a Diversity Survey administered to ENMU personnel and students. When results of a similar survey in 1992 were compared with the current year's results, it appears that ENMU has made great strides in improving the campus climate with respect to diversity issues. The second issue presents results from the Cooperative Institute Research Program of the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles, for college freshmen in national and ENMU samples about student characteristics.  In the third issue, the ENMU Academic Outcomes Assessment Plan (AOAP) for the university's general education curriculum is presented. Issue 4 outlines the Assessment Criteria/Procedures and the results. The issue also identifies strengths and concerns of the program based on the results. Issue 5 continues the discussion of the AOAP for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences by discipline. Issue 6 presents a sampling of the initial assessment results for departments in the College of Education and Technology, the College of Fine Arts, and the College of Business for the AOAP from 1995-96. Issue 7 presents results from a survey of student satisfaction at ENMU. In all cases, measures of student satisfaction increased from the initial survey in 1994. (Contains 7 tables and 30 graphs.)   [More]  Descriptors: College Students, Curriculum Development, Educational Assessment, Educational Environment

Testa, Alec M. (1996). DATAWave, Volume 4, 9/11/96 – 12/4/96. The DATAWave is a bi-weekly publication that is designed to inform the campus community and broader constituencies on assessment issues and practices at Eastern New Mexico University (ENMU). The first issue of this fourth volume covers survey results about the effectiveness of the ENMU Assessment Resource Office (ARO) and presents a fall preview of ARO activities. Issues two and three report findings from the Cooperative Institute Research Project, a survey administered to freshmen at 641 colleges. In issue two, survey results about attitudes, behaviors, and goals for 425 first time ENMU freshmen are reported, and in issue three the focus is on faculty results. At ENMU 96 full-time undergraduate faculty responded as part of the more than 33,986 faculty members nationwide. Issue four reports that results of a survey of employers asked to rate ENMU students indicate that employers generally found ENMU graduates well-prepared. Issue five presents results from the Student Satisfaction Survey, which documents a high degree of student dissatisfaction with many aspects of university life. Issue six contains an update on Outcomes Assessment Activities, Assessment of the Eastern Mission, an Outcomes Assessment Matrix, and a list of the recipients of the fall 1996 Outcomes Assessment Grant awards. Issue seven reports results from the 1992 and 1996 Diversity Survey. (Contains 5 tables and 19 figures.) Descriptors: College Faculty, College Freshmen, College Graduates, Cultural Pluralism

CLINE, MARION, JR. (1961). IMPROVING LANGUAGE ARTS OF BILINGUALS THROUGH AUDIOVISUAL MEANS. THIS IS AN EVALUATION OF THE USE OF AUDIOVISUAL AIDS WITH BILINGUAL SPANISH-SPEAKING CHILDREN OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO. THE SCHOOL YEARS OF 1959-61 WERE SPENT IN SEEKING THE MEANS OF OVERCOMING THE LANGUAGE HANDICAPS OF BILINGUAL PUPILS BY THE USE OF AUDIOVISUAL AIDS. TWELVE GROUPS WERE USED, 6 EXPERIMENTAL AND 6 CONTROL GROUPS. DURING 1/2 HOUR A DAY FOR A TOTAL OF 2 1/2 HOURS PER WEEK, THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUPS WERE TAUGHT WITH ALL AVAILABLE VISUAL AND AUDIO AIDS SUITED TO THE FOURTH-GRADE CURRICULUM. THE CONTROL GROUPS WERE INSTRUCTED WITHOUT SPECIAL ATTENTION TO AUDIOVISUALS. TEACHERS SELECTED FOR THE PROJECT HAD PARTICIPATED IN A SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AUDIOVISUAL AIDS. ACHIEVEMENT TESTS AND ORAL READING TESTS WERE ADMINISTERED TO BOTH GROUPS. ON MOST OF THE VARIABLES, THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUPS ACHIEVED SIGNIFICANTLY BETTER RESULTS THAN THE CONTROL GROUPS. A NUMBER OF SIGNIFICANT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESEARCH ON PREPARATION AND USE OF AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE INCLUDED IN THE REPORT. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Audiovisual Aids, Bilingual Students, Curriculum Enrichment

Stabler, Karen, Comp. (1992). Chicano Studies: A Bibliography of Primary Reference Sources. This document provides primary references (mostly in English) on Chicano topics and a basic strategy for researching topics related to Chicanos. The document suggests beginning with dictionaries and encyclopedias as starting points for research. Journals are the best source for current information on a topic. Several indexes list references to journal articles in the field of Chicano studies. CD-ROM databases offer an exciting new approach to the retrieval of citations of journal articles. These include INFOTRAC Academic Index, PsychLIT, ERIC, and ABI/INFORM. Books are not as current as journal articles but will provide more comprehensive coverage of a subject. Sources that may also be helpful include other bibliographies, biographies, directories, statistical references, atlases, genealogical sources, and government documents. In each entry, the bibliography provides the call number of the New Mexico State Univerity Library, the title, publisher, publication date, and a short description of the reference, where appropriate. The document also offers tips for using the various sources. Descriptors: Abstracts, Annotated Bibliographies, Biographies, Databases

Grogan, Nancy M. (1974). UNM General Library/Technology Application Center Literature Search Service, An Experimental Program, FY 1974. Final Report. In July 1973 the University of New Mexico's General Library, in cooperation with the Technology Application Center, introduced a computerized search service for faculty members on a one-year experimental basis. During the study two user evaluation meetings caused some improvements to be made, particularly in the area of working more closely with faculty members in exploring the scope and depth of searches to be made. The final evaluation disclosed that faculty members particularly appreciated the time saved by the service and the comprehensive, up-to-date searches. Many planned to make greater use of the service. The conclusion reached by the study was that the project contributed significantly to improving the quality and quantity of the teaching and research conducted by faculty users and did it in a cost effective manner. The appendixes include a list, with brief descriptions, of the 29 computerized information bases; the evaluation instruments and user comments; a list of searches performed; and a tally of searches provided for each university department.   [More]  Descriptors: College Libraries, Computer Oriented Programs, Computers, Databases

Goho, Tom; And Others (1972). A Preliminary Analysis of Economic Understanding Among Two Ethnic Groups in the Southwest. Center for Business Services Occasional Paper No. 209. A preliminary study was conducted at which the "Test for Economic Understanding" was given to 98 Anglo and 35 Mexican American freshmen and sophomore students at New Mexico State University at the beginning and end of the 1971 fall semester. The following questions guided the investigation: (1) Is there a significant difference between Mexican American students and Anglo students in terms of their understanding of basic economics at the onset of a principles course in economics? (2) Is there a significant difference between Mexican American students and Anglo students in terms of their understanding of basic economics at the end of the same course? (3) Is there a significant difference in the relative gain in economic understanding between the two groups? The findings indicated that the significant difference in economic literacy which existed between Anglo and Mexican American students at the beginning of an introductory course in economics appeared to be eliminated upon completion of the course. In the expanded study currently under investigation, the sample size has been increased from 133 to 216 Anglo and Mexican American students. The primary interest of the current investigation is to determine what, if any, factors other than ethnicity, are related to changes in economic understanding. The analytical tool to be utilized in treating the data involves computing in sequence multiple linear regressions equations.   [More]  Descriptors: Economics Education, Educational Quality, Ethnic Studies, Learning Problems

Rifenbary, Deborah (1991). An Introduction to Multicultural Issues in Career Development. Becoming a culturally skilled career counselor is an important step in working effectively with ethnic minorities. Much of the professional literature has indicated that a traditional counseling model, one that has been derived from a traditional white middle class model, may not be effective in working with culturally diverse clients. The model described in this paper has been designed to assist career counselors to become "culturally skilled," and in so doing to provide more effective career counseling to cultural groups which are particular to the State of New Mexico. The model is divided into five parts. Part 1 provides an introduction which addresses the need for and history of cross-cultural counseling. It presents several theoretical orientations that may be helpful in understanding ethnic minorities, and addresses myths relative to ethnic minority groups. Part 2 includes an awareness component which consists of activities that will enable a counselor working with ethnic minorities to understand his or her cultural background and acknowledge biases, attitudes, and beliefs relative to ethnic minorities. Part 3 contains a knowledge component with information regarding the values and beliefs of ethnic minority groups, barriers indigenous to cultural differences, and information specific to effective cross-cultural counseling. Part 4 includes a skills component which gives guidelines and strategies for working with minorities. Part 5 contains culturally relevant materials and a comprehensive list of references helpful in understanding ethnic groups.  Descriptors: Career Counseling, Career Development, Counseling Techniques, Counselors

Chu, Lily (1980). The NIE-NMSU Project on Minorities and Women's Research. A Multi-Purpose Model to Increase Equal Participation in Educational Research. Final Performance Report. The final report for two years (1978-1980) of the National Institute of Education-New Mexico State University Project on Minorities and Women's Research, whose goal was to increase representation of women and minorities in educational research, consists of descriptions of project activities and eight appendices. The descriptive section details planning, implementation, and review/evaluation phases for year one, and implementation and evaluation phases for year two. Project objectives and operations, post-doctoral fellowships, and graduate exchange-internships and fellowships are described for both years. A section on project evaluation lists the 7 research and technical papers published thus far of 22 generated from the first year project, and 13 published papers of 58 generated from the second year. Conference participation, grant proposals generated, and degrees completed by project fellows are noted. Conclusions state that during the 2 years, 24 persons participated in the project, 21 of them women or minorities or both; of 35 grant proposals submitted to state/federal sources, 6 have been funded for a total of $248,000; and 1 doctoral and 3 masters degrees have been completed with project assistance. Appendices give details of recruitment, applicants selected and rejected, seminars, and accomplishments of the project director and other participants. Descriptors: American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Educational Objectives

Stile, Stephen W.; And Others (1992). Post-Preschool Placement of Young Students with Developmental Disabilities Exiting Public Special Education Preschool Programs. Final Report. This study investigated initial placements, current placements, and stability of placements for 2,643 graduates of special education preschool programs for children (ages 3-4 years) with developmental disabilities from 74 New Mexico school districts during the first 5 years of such programming (1986-87 to 1990-91). Major findings were that 10% of the graduates were initially placed in regular education, 41% in regular education with support, and 42% in self-contained classrooms. Seven percent of the graduates had either moved and/or were in other placements (e.g., private schools). Placements then stabilized at approximately 11% in regular education, 35% in regular education with support, 45% in self-contained classrooms, and 7% moved and/or other placements. Data indicate that placements in integrated settings are increasing each year, while placements in self-contained settings are decreasing. Six recommendations are made based upon analysis of the data, and a five-step action plan is presented to bring about needed changes and measure the impact of change. (10 references) Descriptors: Delivery Systems, Developmental Disabilities, Early Intervention, Elementary Education

Bromberg, Walter; And Others (1975). The Native American Speaks. This publication is the product of several workshops and is aimed at multi-ethnic integration of teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching techniques. The 7 articles and 3 bibliographies, contributed by Native American consultants, emphasize recognition and alteration of bias in teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching techniques. Articles are titled "Navajo Culture Today–Alteration of Tradition" (a brief history of Navajo cultural eras, the final era postulated as that of late 20th Century tribal or individual business enterprise); "Cultural Aspects That Affect the Indian Student in Public Schools" (time, competition, future orientation, and talk are cited as philosophical differences); "Contemporary and Traditional Clothing of the Pueblos" (a fashion show commentary designed to differentiate between the 19 pueblos in New Mexico); "The Varied and Changing Nature of the Indian Community" (a plea for educating teachers in terms of Indian identity and the negative aspects of paternalism); "Self Actualization Through the Creative Process" (creativity seen as a means of liberation); "Self-Image of the American Indian–A Preliminary Study" (drugs and Indian psychology, the Indian Gestalt view, and self-image and Indian psychology).   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Bias, Clothing, Creativity

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dept. of English. (1994). Project Step Ahead. Final Performance Report. This report describes a National Workplace Literacy Demonstration project that provided onsite training at participating New Mexico hospitals in job-specific literacy skills necessary for satisfactory job performance. Six courses were offered that integrated language skills with reading, writing, and speaking components–Straight Talk: Communicating in Health Care Settings, The Write Stuff: Memos and Short Reports, Reading and Study Skills, Communication for Supervisors, Effective Presentations, and Effective Performance Appraisals. Each course made use of real workplace documents. Follow-up showed that many participants had been promoted or had their responsibilities increased. One hundred short courses were offered to 811 participants; retention rate was approximately 85 percent. Attachments to the 16-page report include the following: master evaluation summaries for Straight Talk, Write Stuff, Communication for Supervisors, Effective Presentations, and Effective Performance Appraisals; follow-up interview of participants after 3-6 months; executive summary of Straight Talk evaluation; case study of evaluation of communication training effectiveness in the workplace; research summary of Write Stuff pre- and posttests; Write Stuff evaluation of pre- and posttests; Communication for Supervisors follow-up evaluation survey; evaluations of tutoring initiatives at Mimbres Memorial Hospital and Presbyterian Healthcare Services; and a participant-observer's view of a workplace literacy program. Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Literacy, Allied Health Occupations Education, Communication Skills

Hopper, Toni (1997). Strategic Goals for 2000. This is the report of the 2000 New Mexico Association of Community Colleges (NMACC) Strategic Planning Conference. Participants worked in small groups to identify the most probable and the most desirable world for the year 2000. Results for the most probable world include: (1) education would be available to many consumers, using many delivery systems with varying quality and affordability; (2) communication technology would make global environment local; (3) politics would have a heavy influence on policy decisions; (4) there would be a growing underclass unprepared for better opportunities; and (5) competencies and accountability would be more valued than traditional measures (such as degrees and transcripts). Results for the most desirable world include: (1) the world would be at peace; (2) each individual would have total economic security; (3) the world would be crime free; and (4) there would be universal health care. The report also includes probable and desirable futures for NMACC. The most probable futures list includes: (1) there would be a need to replace aging faculty and staff; (2) community colleges would be valued for their role as centers for workforce and economic development; (3) four-year colleges would provide greater competition for students and funding; and (4) community colleges would be more accessible in terms of cost, scheduling, variety of delivery systems, and locations. Includes action plans for developing the most desirable goals for NMACC in 2000.   [More]  Descriptors: Age, Change Strategies, College Faculty, Community Colleges

DeVolder, Arthur L. (1972). Approval Plans: A Survey. In order to gain information about what experiences limited-budget libraries have had with approval plans, a questionnaire was drafted to survey these libraries. The results of the questionnaire are presented in this paper. Twenty-four of the thirty-one libraries surveyed, responded. Responses to each of the questions asked are presented. In general it was apparent that all acquisitions librarians have to abide by the limitations of their institutions and that they are subject to control by the faculty. Many were concerned with the tie-in with one dealer, and they wished more jobbers would participate in approval plans. As a result of the survey and other factors, it was decided to set up a plan to cover all the areas of the university of New Mexico's curriculum. Preparations to implement the approval plan were completed and the plan was put into operation. The plan which has been in operation for seven months appears to be effective.   [More]  Descriptors: College Libraries, Library Acquisition, Library Material Selection, Library Planning

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *