Bibliography: New Mexico (page 153 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Dolores M. Halls, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, E. DALE DOAK, Jack T. Cole, Santa Fe. Div. of Adult Education. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, THOMAS J. MORROW, Richard F. Tonigan, Kenneth Tsosie, Atilano A. Valencia, and Stephen W. Fuller.

Valencia, Atilano A.; And Others (1979). Bilingual Education: A Vehicle for Bilingualism and Biculturalism. Two Presentations in the College of Education, Dialogue Series. Two papers on bilingual education are included. "The Emerging Features of Bilingualism and Bilingual Education in the U.S.A." by Atilano A. Valencia represents an overview of the development of programs and policies to meet the needs of bilingual students in the United States. The federal legislation and key court decisions of the 1960s that were responsible for mandating bilingual instruction are reviewed. Reasons for incomplete success in implementing these mandates are discussed. These reasons include slow development of bilingual teacher training and material development centers, which are only now beginning to meet demand; and continued public reluctance to discard old attitudes which view bilingual education as at best frivolous and at worst a social threat. In"Bilingual/Bicultural Teacher Education: An Approach," Robert L. Gallegos and Roy C. Rodriguez discuss bilingual/bicultural teacher training in New Mexico, which is offered as a model for other programs. Elements of the model include: (1) public school cooperation in providing student teaching opportunities; (2) assessment of student teacher needs; (3) weekly lesson plans consisting of units designed to meet specific (often interdisciplinary) learning objectives; and (4) evaluative conferences between instructors and student teachers, following completion of the program. Descriptors: American Indians, Bilingual Education, Educational Assessment, Federal Regulation

Tonigan, Richard F. (1975). Community College Master Planning Study, Gallup Branch, 1975. This study represents the first formal effort of the University of New Mexico (UNM) to develop an in-depth, long-range master plan for its Gallup Branch Community College (GBCC). It includes: (1) a description of the GBCC district (geography, culture, transportation, population projections, employment, and manpower needs); (2) a description of GBCC itself (history, philosophy, mission and goals, governance structure, enrollment trends, ethnic distribution of students, enrollment projections to 1985, programs and services, finances, and facilities); (3) a brief description of UNM and its relationship to GBCC; (4) a description of the public high schools in the district; and (5) results of questionnaires sent to all the high school seniors within the GBCC district and to all GBCC students (career goals, financial needs, age, and educational background). Following these presentations are suggestions and recommendations, including an academic plan and a capital outlay plan. Appended are demographic data for the GBCC district, the two questionnaires, and a legislative history of branch colleges.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrative Organization, Campus Planning, Capital Outlay (for Fixed Assets), College Role

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1969). [Preparing Para-Professionals To Teach Penitentiary Inmates.]. Consultants and supervisors from the State Department of Education, the Santa Fe Public Schools, and the Penitentiary of New Mexico propose to train 30 two-man teams as paraprofessional teachers and paraprofessional teacher aides for service as classroom teachers in approximately 40 elementary, secondary, and vocational courses for 500 men in the penitentiary. The training program will include pre-orientation conference preparation, a 2-week pre-semester orientation conference, and a laboratory seminar on Problems in Classroom Management, including methods and materials of instruction, which will be conducted for a minimum of 6 hours weekly for one semester. A subcontract will be let to an appropriate teacher training institution for the professional aspects thereof. During the orientation conference, guidelines will be developed for the general educational program for economically and culturally deprived members of the Anglo, Hispanic, Indian, and Negro prison population. These guidelines will be under constant appraisal and modification during the seminar. Problems arising in classroom situations will be referred for solution to the daily meetings through which consultants and supervisors will continue their close association with the teams. Program objectives include attempts to alter attitudes, values, self concepts on the part of all residents and to develop good study habits, organized work plans, advance planning, desirable goals, and periodic evaluation by the paraprofessionals and their students.   [More]  Descriptors: Correctional Education, Disadvantaged, Institutional Cooperation, On the Job Training

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1971). A Rationale for Elementary Social Studies Programs: Area of Instructional Services. This booklet presents an updated rationale for elementary social studies in New Mexico's schools to serve as a catalyst for curricular change and a foundation upon which to build "new" social studies programs which are conceptually based, organized, and implemented. New programs should help students develop analytical skills while learning to empathize like humanists. Objectives, incorporating a combination of humanistic, citizenship and intellectual education, are to help the child: 1) develop an adequate self concept; 2) desire to preserve our national heritage; 3) understand conflicts and how to resolve conflicts; 4) develop loyalty to the state, nation, and to all mankind; 5) accept need for social change; 6) build awareness of the value of work; 7) comprehend the ideal of the dignity of man; and, 8) understand the concept of government by consent of the governed. Key substantive concepts to be considered in a program are: causality, conflict, cooperation, cultural change, differences, independence, modification, power, and social control. Content and instructional strategies are utilized to achieve the stated purposes and to help develop understanding of key concepts. Almost half of the book is devoted to social studies scope and sequence outlines, grades 1-6, from the Albuquerque, Las Cruces, and Los Alamos Public Schools. A bibliography compiled by the Foreign Policy Association, published in 1970, is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Behavioral Objectives, Cognitive Objectives, Concept Teaching, Conceptual Schemes

Tsosie, Kenneth, Comp.; Cherino, Alan J., Comp. (1984). Sources of Financial Aid Available to American Indian Students. The booklet provides information and sources on financial aid for American Indian college students. The introduction explains college-based funding, federal aid programs, American Indian financial aid sources, and financial aid package. The section on admissions and financial aid process outlines procedures the undergraduate or graduate student must take when interested in attending college or wanting to apply for financial aid. Federal aid programs and the Bureau of Indian Affairs Higher Education Grant/Loan Program are described under major sources of financial aid. Additional sources of financial aid include organizations that provide scholarships, grants, or loans for undergraduate or graduate students. Each citation provides the following information: address and phone number, contact person, type of aid, deadline, duration of financial aid, amount, requirements of applying (i.e. field of study, school, grade point average), and comments. The last section lists colleges and universities located in the Southwest (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Utah) that have special programs for American Indian students and offer financial assistance and other support services. Each citation provides name, address, and phone number of institution, population or percentage of American Indian students, student organizations on campus, special studies or programs, and tuition and fees. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Colleges, Educational Resources

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Div. of Adult Education. (1972). Summer Institute for Adult Basic Education Teachers of Spanish-Speaking Adults: July 12-30, 1971. Final Report. The University of New Mexico conducted an Institute for Adult Basic Education Teachers with the goal of encouraging the approximately 100 participants, all teachers of Spanish-speaking adults, to integrate their previous knowledge and training with the information, materials, ideas, and techniques presented at the institute, to make them more effective teachers. The main goal was accomplished through the instruction related to the institute's program objectives; (1) how to write and utilize behavioral objectives which will improve their teaching; (2) instruction in the techniques of microteaching; (3) to aid in the understanding and appreciation of the sociopsychological realities and problems of the Spanish-speaking adult; (4) instruction in the most effective methods of teaching English as a second language and teaching reading skills in an integrated program; and (5) the utilization of the personal growth curriculum in order to meet individual needs. To attain these objectives the institute's program concentrated on the subject areas of cultural awareness, personal growth curriculum, English as a second language, reading and guidance and counseling. One of the most important by-products of the institute was the development of a reading kit for beginning ABE teachers, which is briefly outlined at the conclusion.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Behavioral Objectives, Cultural Awareness, English (Second Language)

DOAK, E. DALE (1966). AN EVALUATION APPROACH DESIGNED TO IDENTIFY THE LEVELS OF THINKING EXISTENT IN SELECT CLASSROOMS AS EXHIBITED BY TEACHER AND STUDENT VERBAL BEHAVIOR. FINAL REPORT. THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE THE LEVELS OF THINKING THAT CHARACTERIZED TRACK I AND TRACK IV CLASSES IN ENGLISH, MATHEMATICS, AND SOCIAL STUDIES AT THE EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL. THE DATA WERE GATHERED AT CENTRAL JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL, ALAMOGORDO, NEW MEXICO, BY OBSERVERS RECORDING THE VERBAL INTERCHANGES AND TEACHER-PUPIL TALK OR PUPIL-PUPIL TALK, WHICH TOOK PLACE AT THREE-MINUTE INTERVALS IN THE EIGHTH GRADE CLASSES DESIGNATED AS THE SAMPLE. FIVE OBSERVERS VISITED EACH CLASS ON DIFFERENT DAYS AND RECORDED A TOTAL OF TWENTY-EIGHT OBSERVATIONS. THE STATISTICAL COMPARISONS YIELDED NO SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MEANS AT THE .05 LEVEL. CONCLUSIONS FROM THE STUDY INDICATE–(1) DIFFERENTIATION OF INSTRUCTION BETWEEN TRACK I AND IV IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS INVESTIGATED DOES NOT APPEAR TO BE IN TERMS OF LEVEL OF THINKING, (2) TEACHING IN THE SUBJECT AREAS INVESTIGATED APPEARS TO BE AIMED PRIMARILY AT THE COMMUNICATION OF KNOWLEDGE RATHER THAN AT ACTIVE EXPLORATION THROUGH VARIED LEVELS OF THINKING, (3) APPARENTLY TEACHER VERBALIZATION PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DETERMINING THE LEVEL AT WHICH CLASSROOM INTERACTION OCCURS, AND (4) THINKING AT ONE LEVEL SHOULD BE DEVELOPED ADEQUATELY BEFORE HIGHER LEVELS ARE ATTEMPTED.   [More]  Descriptors: Comprehension, English, Grade 8, Grouping (Instructional Purposes)

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1982). Indian Resource Development and Internship Program. Annual Report 1981-1982. The Indian Resource Development and Internship (IRDI) Program marked its seventh year by continuing to assist Indian tribes in developing a managerial, professional, and scientific corps of American Indians through college academic education and related practical work experience. Participants attended universities and pursued majors of their choice, considering tribal needs and individual interests. Following the introduction and a brief history of IRDI, the 1981-82 annual report covers: transition to a new leadership (permanent staff and program); recruitment of Indian high school and college (undergraduate and graduate) students; student services (financial aid information, retention, tutoring and counseling, etc.); work experience through part-time, work study, summer jobs, internships, co-op assignments, and employment assistance; student seminars (high school orientation and business seminar), and adult seminars (Indian women's professional advancement, real property seminar), and agricultural and economic development activities). Other topics of the report include: program support from Trust and Real Property Management, College of Engineering, Native American Engineering Program, institutions, tribes, and organizations; institute development (history, strategy, support, and future); advisory committees; New Mexico 1982-83 legislation; and proposal to the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Numerous appendices include examples of letters, job descriptions, lists of participants, etc. Descriptors: Adult Programs, Advisory Committees, Agriculture, American Indian Education

Croft, Don B. (1976). Competency Based Education and Teacher and Student Performance: The Impact of the Las Cruces Public School Model. A competency-based education program was implemented in the Las Cruces, New Mexico public schools, with emphasis on teacher training and field testing of various competency-based models. Program impact was determined according to changes in teaching techniques, student achievement, and student social behavior in both experimental and control schools. Pre- and post-test attitude questionnaires were administered to both teachers and students. Students were tested in ten areas of language and mathematics achievement, using the California Test of Basic Skills. The results indicated the program was effective in changing the behavior of teachers toward a more cooperative and student-oriented (individualized) style. The affective behavior of the students was also changed as a result of the program; there were more achievement-oriented and fewer ambivalent students at the end of the program. No significant differences were found in student achievement between program participants and controls. This may be explained by premature timing of the achievement test administration. Appendices include brief descriptions of the School Image Description Questionnaire and the Instrument for the Observation of Teaching Activities; the Student Behavior Description Questionnaire; and the Philosophy of Teaching Form. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Affective Behavior, Attitude Change, Behavior Change

Fuller, Stephen W. (1971). Industrial Development Bonds for Financing Projects in Rural Areas. Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report 216. As one of several special reports on development possibilities for the agriculture and forestry sector of the Four Corners Economic Development Region, this monograph deals with the use of industrial development bonds as a means of resolving finance problems arising from inadequate or nonexistent credit in rural areas. Distinguishing between the general obligation bond (one secured by obligating repayment through tax revenues) and the revenue bond (one secured by the industrial project itself), this report details the laws governing industrial development bonds in each of the states in the Four Corners Region (New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, and Arizona). Additionally, this document presents discussion on the following: (1) the advantages and disadvantages of industrial development bonds; (2) the historical development of industrial development bonds; and (3) the implementation procedure for industrial revenue bonds. The appendices present: (1) A Sample Ordinance Relating to Requirements for the Issuance by a Municipality of Revenue Bonds Pursuant to the Industrial Revenue Bond Act; and (2) Information Required for Applications for Issuance of Municipal Industrial Revenue Bonds.   [More]  Descriptors: Credit (Finance), Financial Support, History, Industry

Halls, Dolores M.; And Others (1987). As Families Grow Older: Information for Family Caregivers. Final Report. This document presents the final report of the "As Families Grow Older" project, a continuing education program for aging network service providers and family members in 23 counties throughout New Mexico which was designed to promote family well-being. It describes how the project, which was in operation from April 1986 through January 1987, trained 448 service providers and 273 family members in knowledge and skill development for promoting family well-being through workshops which focused on: (1) normal physical and psychological changes of aging; (2) intergenerational communication skills; (3) health promotion, including units on nutrition, physical fitness, stress management, medication management, and accident prevention; (4) legal and financial considerations; (5) community resources for elders; and (6) mutual support groups. The report contains a project abstract; a section on policy and program implications; a discussion of dissemination and utilization; an executive summary; and five chapters dealing with the evaluation procedure and results. A master bibliography, an agenda for a 2-day workshop, an evaluation form, the original combined summary evaluation results by county, and the follow-up combined summary evaluation results by county are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Aging (Individuals), Family (Sociological Unit), Human Services, Program Effectiveness

Cole, Jack T.; De Leon, Josie (1985). An Investigation into the Development and Validation of an Assessment Procedure for Identifying Language Disorders in Spanish/English Bilingual Children. Sixty bilingual Mexican American children (20 language disorderd, 20 not qualifying for placement, 20 comparison) between the ages of 7-10 from 2 school districts in southern New Mexico participated in the study to develop and validate an assessment procedure to determine language disorders in Spanish/English bilingual children. An ex post facto approach was used in the validation of the assessment procedure which included subject testing, parent interviews, and teacher checklists. Five experts reviewed the assessment data. The investigation did not produce any recommendations on evaluation measures that appeared to be more viable than others in discriminating differences in the language disordered and non-language disordered bilingual child. The findings demonstrated the complexity of attempting to develop and validate a procedure and the obvious need to establish some validity in the diagnosis of language disorders in Spanish/English bilingual children. The study concluded that it will take much research to ultimately determine what diagnosticians should include in the evaluation. Fourteen appendices include correspondence and forms used in the study.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Students, Children, Communication Disorders, Comparative Analysis

Lujan, Harry A.; And Others (1985). An Elementary Principal Preparation Program for American Indian Trainees. Final Report. Implemented by personnel in the Department of Educational Management at New Mexico State University, this program trained 32 American Indian teachers to become elementary school principals during 5 1-year cycles. Program candidates held bachelor's degrees from accredited universities, had taught 3 years at the elementary level, and demonstrated career commitment to administration of Indian elementary education. The curriculum included standard credits for the Master of Arts in Educational Administration and additional courses such as tribal-community relationship, cultural maintenance, fiscal responsibility, and faculty growth. Students completed an internship at schools with high Indian populations in six states. Surveys to measure employment status of program graduates and their perceptions of the quality of the program found 57% of the 18 respondents employed in administrative positions, 39% in education-related fields, and 4% employed in fields not related to education; 89% of respondents rated the program very good to excellent. Perceived program strengths included course selection and diversity, internship, program personnel, and peer group relationships. Program weaknesses included course content in Indian education, general education, and administration, and job placement services. A program recruitment brochure and a list of program participants, their tribal affiliation, internship site, and degree date are appended. Descriptors: Administrator Education, American Indian Education, American Indians, Elementary Education

MORROW, THOMAS J. (1965). PROGRAMMED MATHEMATICS, DES MOINES HIGH SCHOOL. PROGRAMED MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION WAS USED OVER A TWO-YEAR PERIOD IN THE HIGH SCHOOL AT DES MOINES, NEW MEXICO. THE MAIN PURPOSE WAS TO OVERCOME MATHEMATICS LIMITATIONS OF THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT FROM SMALL SCHOOLS AND TO OFFER NON COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENTS A SOUND MATHEMATICS BASE CURRICULA. THE TEST GROUP OF 46 STUDENTS BEGAN AT 3 DIFFERENT POINTS IN THE PROGRAM AND PROCEEDED INDIVIDUALLY. THE PROGRAMED COURSES USED WERE "MODERN MATHEMATICS, COURSE I" (SRA), "INTRODUCTION TO MODERN MATHEMATICS" (TMI GROLIER), AND "PROPERTIES OF NUMBER SYSTEMS, VOLUMES I AND II" (TMI GROLIER). PARENTS RECEIVED PROGRESS REPORTS ON THE STUDENTS RATHER THAN PERCENTAGE OR LETTER GRADES. EVALUATION OF THE PROJECT INDICATED FEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR INTERACTION BETWEEN TEACHER AND STUDENTS, AND STUDENT-REACTION CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GROUP WERE LACKING. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT PROGRAMED MATERIALS SHOULD SUPPLEMENT, AS ENRICHMENT FOR THE ABLE STUDENT AND ASSISTANCE FOR THE SLOW LEARNER, RATHER THEN REPLACE STANDARD INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS.   [More]  Descriptors: Carrels, Class Organization, College Preparation, Credits

Beam, Gail Chasey; And Others (1993). Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention): Inservice Training Program for Related Services Personnel, October 1, 1990-September 30, 1993. Final Report. This final report describes activities and achievements of Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention), which developed, implemented, and evaluated an inservice training model to increase the competencies of team members from different disciplines as well as parents. The project was designed to assist in the implementation of Public Law 99-457 (later incorporated within the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). The project was intended to impact early intervention services at the state level and and at the community-based early intervention program level. Project staff accomplished their goal by: (1) providing training of early intervention teams within a community; (2) developing training materials based on competencies needed by all team members; (3) developing training materials based on critical competencies needed by individual disciplines; (4) providing technical assistance and support; (5) disseminating effectiveness data and training materials; and (6) securing funding for Project TIE Outreach. The project developed four discipline-specific training modules, for health care professionals, occupational and physical therapists, speech language pathologists, and parents. Three model demonstration sites received assessments of their teams' procedures and training needs. Additional dissemination activities resulted in nearly 110 training activities throughout the U.S. Appendices include a discussion of the performance competence model, a description of the development of "community maps" showing various agency interactions at the Santa Fe (New Mexico) site, and two competency exams used in the program. (Contains 20 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Agency Cooperation, Community Programs, Competency Based Education, Compliance (Legal)

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