Bibliography: New Mexico (page 154 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the GPNM . US website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Kathleen Baca, Albuquerque. Inst. for Social Research and Development. New Mexico Univ, RICHARD L. HOLEMON, Las Cruces. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction. New Mexico State Univ, Rebecca Smith, Albuquerque. New Mexico Regional Medical Program, Las Cruces. Dona Ana Branch Community Coll. New Mexico State Univ, Jo Ann Willie, Santa Fe. Div. of Special Education. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, and John E. Uxer.

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Div. of Special Education. (1974). A Guide for Teachers of the Educable Mentally Handicapped. Secondary. Presented is a curriculum guide for a prevocational, vocational, and work study program to be used with educable mentally retarded (EMR) students, 12 to 21 years of age. Delineated are the following aspects of New Mexico's program for EMR students: definition, rationale, educational interventions, administration, psychoeducational diagnosis for placement, individual programing, and teacher qualifications. Provided for students 12 to 16 years of age in the prevocational level are objectives, activities, and instructional materials in the following skill areas: communication (such as reading), mathematics and science to achieve academic skills: interpersonal relationships, citizenship, safety/health/hygiene, and leisure time skills (such as music and physical education) to achieve social skills; and vocational training, job tasks, and home arts to achieve vocational skills. The vocational component for students 15 to 21 years of age is presented in the same format though science and leisure time skills are omitted. The work study program is described in terms of objectives (such as participation in a productive way of life), eligibility, school responsibilities, community canvassing, and task analyses of work stations such as the library aide. Illustrations show skill components for occupational areas of homemaking, housekeeping, food services building trades, auto skills, and garden/nursery work. Included are attachments such as child labor provisions. Given in the appendix are items such as a bilingual/bicultural model and a bibliography of approximately 300 instructional materials and sources.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Adolescents, Curriculum Guides, Exceptional Child Education

New Mexico Council for the Development of Educational Talent, Las Vegas. (1969). A Contract to Encourage Full Utilization of Educational Talent. Final Report 1968-1969. Goals of the New Mexico Educational Talent Project–funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act–are (1) to identify qualified secondary school students at the 11th grade or earlier and assist them in completing their high school education, (2) to encourage an increasing number of high school students to select a teaching career, (3) to identify potential high school dropouts, (4) to encourage collegiate dropouts to return to school, (5) to encourage high school graduates with high academic potential to attempt post-secondary education, (6) to provide sustained counseling efforts with Indian and rural youth to encourage them to seek additional education, and (7) to develop effective ways for improving communication between college students, college staffs, and administration. During 1968-69, a coordinator and 4 field representatives contacted 162,769 persons (including group presentations). Referrals (777) received during the year were principally from school personnel and the Welfare Department personnel. When referred, 60% were high school students; 23% were high school graduates; 8.5% were high school dropouts; and 8.5% comprised the remainder of the referrals. Although student action in the fall is difficult to predict, it is estimated that 33% will enroll in college, 7.5% will attend vocational-technical schools, and 7.5% will take miscellaneous action.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Attitudes, Career Choice, Career Counseling

Smith, Rebecca; And Others (1990). Strengthening Science Outreach Programs for Rural Elementary Schools: A Manual for Museum Staffs. Intended for the staffs of museums, zoos, and other science related centers, this manual is a step by step guide to establishing a rural science outreach and education program. Based on the experiences of the New Mexico Rural Science Education Project (NMRSEP), this manual focuses on rural elementary schools and on earth and life sciences. Much of its material, however, may be applicable to other educational levels and other areas of science. Chapters outline the following topics: (1) steps necessary to gain support from museum leadership; (2) ways to find funding; (3) program placement within the organization; (4) selection of appropriate project staff; (5) outreach strategies; (6) tips for establishing effective partnerships with rural schools and teachers; (7) identification and development of program content; and (8) evaluation of program effectiveness. Recommended program components include: (1) a review of state and district science goals and requirements; (2) field surveys of local natural resources in each school's community; (3) preparation of resource materials for teachers, based on the field surveys; (4) field trips and inservice workshops for teachers; (5) expansion of rural teachers' education network; and (6) ongoing support from the museum. Many examples and sample activities are provided. Appendices contain a history and description of NMRSEP and an annotated bibliography of over 70 resource materials.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Cooperation, Elementary Education, Elementary School Science, Inservice Teacher Education

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction. (1989). Empowered Leadership: Effective Schools. Eleven graduate students from the geographic area near and around Southern New Mexico and West Texas, all seasoned professionals in education, all in leadership roles, have presented their approach to leadership. Three commonalities characterize their approaches as revealed by the 10 chapters of this document: (1) leaders must be empowered in order to be effective; (2) the study of leadership is based on the perspective of the work each leader performs professionally; and, (3) a professional dialogue, sharing discontinuities and continuities, prevails in the exercise of leadership. Chapter 1 focuses on the philosophical roots of effective leadership. Chapter 2 discusses the incongruities between leadership theory and the management of effective schools. Interpersonal competence and characteristics of effective leaders are examined in chapter 3. Chapter 4 centers on leader attitudes and his or her instructional role. Chapter 5 discusses the relationship between technology and leadership. Effective leadership in an ethnic setting and leadership in at-risk programs are the foci of chapters 6 and 7. Teacher evaluation and teachers as leaders are among the issues considered in chapters 8 and 9. Chapter 10 links group empowerment to the efficacious leader. Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Administrator Characteristics, Administrator Effectiveness, Administrator Qualifications

Blackwell, Peggy J.; And Others (1973). Goals of Secondary Education as Perceived by Education Consumers. Volume 1, Summary. A study to determine parental attitudes towards the education their secondary school children were receiving was conducted at two sites: Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A major objective was to determine the range of parent concerns, the logical structure of these concerns, and the priorities among the concerns. A secondary objective was to compare the structure as established by parents with that established by professionals and to compare priorities of the two groups. Analysis of the interviews showed a high similarity in the nature and range of parental concerns in both cities, with some differences attributable to geographic location and nature of the community. The following six outcomes, as determined by priority ranking were: (1) academic achievement; (2) vocational education; (3) personal growth; (4) moral development; (5) college preparation; and (6) citizenship education. Each of these outcomes is discussed with comparisons made between attitudes and emphasis in the two cities surveyed, and comparisons between attitudes of teachers and professional educators. There are four appendixes. The first briefly describes sampling procedures and the demographic characteristics of the two cities. The second focuses on the ranking of goals in Albuquerque. The structure of outcome goals from both cities, and parents and professionals, is presented in tabular form in the third appendix. Differences are ranked in the final appendix. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Citizenship, College Preparation, Educational Objectives

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Bilingual Teacher Training Unit. (1976). Bilingual Education Models. There is some disagreement among educators and theoreticians concerning the definition of bilingual education. The Department of Education of the State of New Mexico has set forth two plans designed to establish a clear position for any local school district in the matter of bilingual education. The first model, full acculturation, represents a transitional program which uses the child's language and culture as "conceptual bridges" for an all-English curriculum. This plan is not used to maintain and expand the home language or culture of the non-Anglo American community. The second model, language and cultural maintenance, has as its purpose the maintenance and further development of the non-English language and culture of the students. It offers a richer education for the English-speaking student, as well. The importance of community involvement is emphasized no matter which bilingual model is chosen. This report includes suggestions for curriculum components and four time and content models. Descriptors: Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Bilingual Schools, Bilingual Students

Willie, Jo Ann, Comp.; And Others (1985). Sources of Financial Aid Available to American Indian Students. The booklet describes sources of financial aid (fellowships, grants, loans, scholarships, work study programs) for American Indian college students and provides guidelines for admission and the financial aid application process for both undergraduate and graduate students. Identified as major sources of financial aid are five federal programs (Basic Educational Opportunity Grant or Pell Grant, Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work Study Program, National Direct Student Loan, Guaranteed Student Loan); state aid programs; Bureau of Indian Affairs Higher Education Grant/Loan Program; and tribal scholarships. Information about 45 other sources of financial aid (business, professional, educational, religious, and Indian organizations) is given including names, addresses, and telephone numbers of contact persons; type, amount, and duration of aid; application deadlines; applicant requirements; required field of study and grade point average. Fifty colleges and universities in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Utah that offer financial aid and other support services for American Indian students are cited. Information provided about each institution includes number and percentage of American Indian students to total student population, special programs, student organizations, financial aid, special studies, summer programs, tuition and fees, and room and board costs. Descriptors: Access to Education, American Indian Education, American Indians, Colleges

Lopez-Emslie, Julia Rosa; Pages, Myrtha E. R. (1989). Bilingual/Multicultural Education and Counseling Program. Eastern New Mexico University's Bilingual/Multicultural Education and Counseling Program was established to train bilingual teachers for the underserved limited-English-speaking, Hispanic population of the area through undergraduate bilingual teacher training and graduate bilingual counseling and guidance training. Its primary objectives are to (1) provide financial resources to support student participation; (2) improve existing program offerings; (3) promote staff development, emphasizing advancement opportunities; (4) establish a close working relationship with the community; (5) include appropriate clinical experiences for student teachers; (6) involve parents in the educational process; and (7) meet licensure and other institutional and state requirements. Undergraduate instruction is in methodology for instruction of English as a Second Language, use of Spanish for instruction when necessary, linguistic competency in both English and Spanish, evaluation and assessment, culture, history and literature, and state-required core teacher competencies. The graduate component emphasizes development of counseling and guidance skills and working with parents to foster successful partnership with schools. The program has been sucessful and met its goals as of the second year of operation.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Counselor Training, Elementary Secondary Education, English (Second Language)

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Inst. for Social Research and Development. (1973). Goals of Secondary Education as Perceived by Education Consumers. Volume IV, Quantitative Results. The results of a study to determine attitudes of parents and professional educators toward educational goals for secondary school students are analyzed in this report. The survey was conducted in two communities–Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The essential nature of the results is summarized by the following categories: (1) general academic knowledge and the best means of achieving it; (2) personal and social adjustment and maturity; (3) providing knowledge on the need to conform; (4) informed citizenship and understanding of the process of government; (5) college preparation; (6) moral responsibility; and (7) vocational specific training. Five items not directly bearing upon the school's responsibility but included in the opinion questionnaire were family responsibility, physical fitness, consumer role, cultural appreciation, and services and facilities for parents and other members of the community. Tables present the priorities ascribed to each of these categories by parents and professional educators. Comparative tables are presented listing the responses from the two cities, their differences and likenesses, and opinions on how well the educational system is responding to expressed needs. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Citizenship, College Preparation, Data Analysis

New Mexico Regional Medical Program, Albuquerque. (1971). Chronic Pulmonary Disease in Children and Young Adults. Community Visitation Training Program. This curriculum guide outlines the subject matter, techniques, and demonstrations presented to medical and paramedical personnel in a 1-week course offered at the New Mexico Pulmonary Center on the diagnostic evaluation of and the use of the most recent therapeutic techniques for children with chronic respiratory disorders. The manual's five sections are each divided into several content areas. Approximately one-third of the content is presented in outline form while the remainder is discussed in more detail and includes, in some instances, references, diagrams, and charts. The five sections with some representative subdivisions are as follows: (1) Basic Clinical Evaluation (Laboratory Evaluation and Pediatric Skin Testing by the Scratch Method); (2) Clinical Syndromes (The Mechanics of Ventilation and Respiratory Allergies in Children); (3) Acute Respiratory Emergencies (Acute Respiratory Failure and Mechanical Ventilation of the Lungs); (4) Supportive Therapy (Psychological Aspects of Children with Chronic Pulmonary Disease and Living with Cystic Fibrosis); and (5) Inhalation Therapy (The Principles of Inhalation Therapy and Inhalation Therapy for Infants). The appendix comprises about one-half of the manual and includes information on the Pulmonary Center; hospital aids such as a pediatric emergency cart; postural drainage instructions; airway obstruction; inhalation therapy; and pulmonary function aids such as the predicted values for maximum breathing capacity in children. Descriptors: Allied Health Occupations Education, Children, Clinical Diagnosis, Clinics

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dona Ana Branch Community Coll. (1991). Dona Ana Branch Community College Five-Year Plan: Adopted 1989, Revised 1990-1991. In 1990-91, responding to the rapid growth and change of both community and college, New Mexico State University's (NMSU's) Dona Ana Branch Community College (DABCC) revised its 5-year plan which was adopted in 1989 to establish goals that would shape the actions, policies, and plans of the college. These goals included: (1) increase instructional excellence and student success; (2) increase access to the community college throughout the service area; (3) assume a partnership role with Dona Ana County in serving the community's educational and economic needs; (4) provide the staff and facilities needed to serve a rapidly increasing enrollment; (5) evolve into a comprehensive community college; (6) develop adequate funding resources for rapid expansion; and (7) maintain a close relationship with NMSU. Nineteen new programs are being considered for implementation over the next 5 years, including eight allied health occupations programs. Many of the programs respond to identified regional employment needs. This 5-year plan includes brief reports on the characteristics of DABCC's full-time faculty; six college programs that have been recognized for their excellence or distinct contributions; and existing academic programs and program review efforts. Descriptors: College Planning, College Programs, Community Colleges, Long Range Planning

Baca, Kathleen; And Others (1993). A Survey of the Community's Information and Attitudes about Dona Ana Branch Community College. A Research Report. In 1992, Dona Ana Branch Community College (DABCC) in Las Cruces, New Mexico, conducted a telephone survey of a random sample of Dona Ana County residents to examine community attitudes towards the college. In particular, the study examined barriers to student access; the reputation and visibility of DABCC; community awareness of programs, courses, and delivery formats; community perceptions of the quality of instruction; and community understanding and support of the college. A total of 167 calls were completed with usable responses to at least some of the survey questions. Where possible, results were compared with findings from a similar survey conducted in 1990. Study findings included the following: (1) 88% of the respondents were aware of DABCC, an increase of 10% from 1990; (2) 81% were aware of occupational training courses, while 58% were aware of student services; (3) significantly more males than females were aware of adult basic education, evening and weekend scheduling, satellite campus classes, availability of financial aid, and student support services; (4) 31% of the respondents or their relatives had taken courses at DABCC, and 96% of them described the quality of instruction as excellent or good; (5) significantly more respondents over 59 years of age believed that continuing to offer community education courses was important; and (6) the greatest impediments to taking classes were lack of time among 26 to 40 year-olds, and lack of money among 18 to 25 year olds. Recommendations, 14 data tables/figures, and the survey instrument are included.   [More]  Descriptors: College Outcomes Assessment, Community Attitudes, Community Colleges, Community Surveys

New Mexico Regional Medical Program, Albuquerque. (1975). Rural Critical Care Nurse Training Project–Four Corners Area, November 14, 1975. Project objectives were to train 10 nurses from hospitals in the Four Corners Area in rural critical care nursing, to have a training director organize and coordinate the project, and to utilize the replacement nurse concept. The course curriculum was determined through a needs assessment survey conducted by a team of health professionals from Arizona universities, and on-site clinical visits made to participating hospitals to discuss curriculum content with the nursing director and prospective trainee. Eleven nurses (9 RNs and 2 LPNs) took the 2-week course in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Ten were replaced by project-hired nurses. Since the eleventh nurse was the nursing director from Zuni, no replacement was hired. Six nurses were Navajo, one was a Pueblo Indian, and four were Anglo. Two groups of five nurses each attended the course on alternating weeks. Subjective and objective evaluations were conducted through pre- and posttests, and questionnaires given to the trainees, nursing directors from the participating hospitals, and the replacement nurses. After the course was completed, the training director, replacement nurses, nursing directors, and trainees met to evaluate the project's effectiveness. Overall, everyone felt the project had been effective. Appendices include a list of participating rural hospitals, nurse trainees, and replacement nurses' rotation assignments; results of the trainees' self-assessment of skills; and the various evaluation forms. Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Course Content, Hospital Personnel

Uxer, John E. (1968). The Function and Status by 1980 of Vocational Education in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Years, Work Project No. 14. To determine the function and status of post-secondary vocational education, a literature review and nine-state survey were used in projecting the post-secondary educational needs and trends in New Mexico for 1980. Data indicated: (1) Vocational schools had a mean beginning enrollment of 192 with a projected growth of 411 by 1966, (2) The average vocational school surveyed had been in operation 3.7 years and its enrollment had grown by 69.4 students per year, (3) 0.3 percent of the present total population was enrolled in area vocational schools, (4) The mean ninth through 12th grade enrollment in area vocational districts was 6,427, (5) The mean distance of the area vocational schools from the nearest similar institution was 61 miles, (6) Just under one-half of the area vocational school teachers had earned no degree, and (7) The median cost per student was $1,000. Projections to the year 1980 revealed: (1) three levels of vocational education instruction of pre-vocational, manipulative skill and sub-professional, (2) integration of pre-vocational education in secondary schools, (3) 95 percent of the population residing within 75 miles of area vocational schools offering manipulative skill and sub-professional instruction, (4) inservice training programs for upgrading of instructors, (5) broader scope of curricular offerings, and (6) financing at a higher level with federal funds.   [More]  Descriptors: Curriculum, Educational Trends, Enrollment, Enrollment Projections

HOLEMON, RICHARD L. (1968). EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATOR TRAINING FOR THE MULTI-CULTURAL COMMUNITY. FINAL REPORT FOR THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH. A THREE-YEAR PILOT PROJECT (1964-1967) WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN EFFECTIVE PROGRAM FOR THE TRAINING OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATORS WHO COULD SERVE AS AGENTS OF CONSTRUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL CHANGE IN COMMUNITIES WITH SIZEABLE PROPORTIONS OF SPANISH- AND INDIAN- AS WELL AS ANGLO-AMERICAN MEMBERS. SPECIAL ASPECTS OF THE PROGRAM INCLUDED–(1) CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE TRAINING PROGRAM BY FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENTS), (2) GROUP TRAINING, (3) RESEARCH ORIENTATION, (4) SPECIAL TRAINING IN THE PROBLEMS OF A MULTI-CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT, (5) INTERNSHIP AND FIELD EXPERIENCES, (6) THE ROLE OF EDUCATION IN THE TOTAL PROCESS OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, AND (7) THE EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATOR AS AN AGENT OF SOCIAL, POLITICAL, AND ECONOMIC CHANGE. PARTICULAR STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF THE PROGRAM ARE OUTLINED, AND TECHNIQUES AND CRITERIA FOLLOWED IN THE SELECTION OF 17 TRAINEES FOR THE NIMH PROGRAM ARE DESCRIBED. AS A RESULT OF THE STUDY, THE PROGRAM IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION TRAINING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO HAS BEEN REDESIGNED TO INCORPORATE POSITIVE FEATURES OF THE PILOT PROJECT.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrators, American Indians, Anglo Americans, Behavioral Sciences

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